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Professor James A. Diamond of the University of Waterloo provides several academic sources in his paper on how Lavan tricked Yaakov (his answer is basically veil + inebriation). These sources in turn claim that veiling the bride was a common practice in that place at that time, none cite the works of Chazal or the Rishonim in support for this contention.


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I think there is a theme in the naming of Leah's and Rachel's children which follows a broader motif. Rachel desires nothing more than to have children, and that is withheld from her. She names her child accordingly, that she should have another child. Her naming the children of Bilhah also follow this theme - the names have to do with having children. ...


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Actually Rivka did send Devora to call Yaakov, however she died on the way. Rashi Braishis 35:8 in the name of Rabbi Moshe Hadarshan "מה עניין דבורה בבית יעקב? אלא לפי שאמרה רבקה ליעקב (כ"ז, מה) 'ושלחתי ולקחתיך משם' – שלחה דבורה אצלו לפדן ארם לצאת משם, ומתה בדרך". See also Medrash Agada.


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As pointed out (in name of Ramban), they were not necessarily idols, so didn't have to be destroyed. This still leaves the question of why would she need them in her possession. Some sources(eg. 1) note that she might have been waiting for a better chance to get rid of them (throw into the dead sea), since burying them was not a good option (it might cause ...


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The Rashbam on that verse says that he is actually named after the prior verse (30:23) - G-d has taken away my reproach., but she changes the Alef to a Yud to ask for another son. So the main name is about taking away the negativity of not having any children, but one letter is changed in order to add the request for a second son as an addition. In Chabad ...


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I'm guessing he was not quoting verbatim and he mixed two medrashim as I will show you. He also seems to have misquoted the one you are looking for. Here is a first quote from him. "More deeply, the Midrash in Breshit Rabbah converts Jacob's vow from a request for supplying his needs to an obligation that he accepted upon himself toward God. Thus: If God ...


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The name Yosef as it relates to his being nothing more than an enabler to his brother's existence is actually quite personal and telling. His youth was spent caring for his brothers. We see he put himself in danger to go check on his brothers at his father's request. And most importantly we find him caring for and providing for his brothers in Mitzrayim. ...


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See the previous pasuk (30:23): וַתַּ֖הַר וַתֵּ֣לֶד בֵּ֑ן וַתֹּ֕אמֶר אָסַ֥ף אֱלֹהִ֖ים אֶת־חֶרְפָּתִֽי׃ There's another word there with the same root, אסף. This phrase is more in line with what how others named their children, after some event that happened with their birth. Here, the event was "‘God hath taken away my reproach.’". Source: I heard this ...


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Rashi (Bereshis 30, pasuk 10) answers on Zilpah that she was very young and the pregnancy was not visible, therefore the verse that she got pregnant was not cited. Regarding Dinah, it could be like Rashi (Bereshis 30, pasuk 21) that Dina should have been a son and Lea prayed that Rachel should be like the other maids so that she was converted to a girl. In ...



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