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10

Nitei Gavriel discusses various practices regarding the Upsherin, such as: Why it is done Age of boy can you cut hair before or push it off how to do the haircutting who should do the haircutting where to do the haircutting He says the first haircut is about teaching the child about the Mitzvah of Pe'ot, since we cut the hair and leave the Pe'ot. Why ...


7

Nitei Gavriel Taspores 2:1:2 says the source of those who do it at 2 is based on Braishis 21:8 "Vayigdal Hayeled" and Rashi says that was at 24 months. Also Shmuel-1 1:22.


4

http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%97%D7%9C%D7%90%D7%A7%D7%94 Aside from the previously mentioned ideas, Wikipedia suggests it might have developed from an older custom to bring children to the grave of Samuel the Prophet (שמואל הנביא) north of Jerusalem and cut their hair there. After the Ottomans restricted Jews' access to the site in the 1500's, it was ...


4

The Shaarei Teshuva Orach Chaim 531:7 mentions the Minhag of Upsherin based on the Arizal. HaRav Chaim Vital in Sefer Shaar HaKavanos mentions this Minhag. ענין מנהג שנהג ישראל ללכת ביום ל"ג בעומר על קברי רשב"י ור"א בנו אשר קבורים במירון, ואוכלים ושותים ושמחים שם, אני ראיתי למורי ז"ל (האר"י) שהלך לשם פעם אחת ביום ל"ג בעומר וכל אנשי ביתו וישב שם שלשה ימים ...


4

See http://www.theyeshivaworld.com/coffeeroom/topic/the-upsherin-what-are-the-origins


4

There are a lot of possible allusions listed in other answers. However, one thing not mentioned is that the practice has a German name, upsheren, and furthermore that: The Pennsylvania German superstition prescribes a wait of a year before the first haircut, lest the infant lose its hair, be a weakling, or die young: EM Fogel, op. cit. (see note 24), ...


3

Or letzion (3:17 3) writes that all children may have haircuts during sefirah since aveilus does not apply to children. However rav Elyashiv (hilchos chag bechag 7 fun 58) that it should be avoided unless there's a need like an upsherin According to Arizal the upsherin is delayed to lag baomer. See dirshu edition mishna beturah 493 note 18


3

I believe that it originated as an allusion Orlah, the first three years of the fruit of a tree being forbidden. Although, that still does not explain how Revai doesn't play into this minhag.


3

http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/upsherinish/02.htm This link has much interesting information regarding an Upsherin


2

I recently heard a reason: that it was originally a superstition to fool the Satan. I.e. the Satan wants baby boys, so by leaving them with long hair, the Satan is fooled until they are no longer of interest. This would fit with a reason given from YWN Coffee Room referenced in another answer: A very significant consideration is also the question if ...


2

According to R. Benyamin Shlomo Hamberger of Shorshei Minhag Ashkenaz, the Upsherin comes from foreign (perhaps Arab) sources which somehow were emulated by the Jews. Professor Daniel Sperber (Minhagei Yisrael 8: 13-30) also suggests foreign origins along these lines. ...


2

The Rivevos Ephraim 1:336 and 2:155:19 talk about this. He seems to hold that for a mitzva its mutar ,however he makes a distinction for those who live in Eretz Yisroel who usually bring their son to meron on lag baomer(even some months earlier) .If he didn't do it on lab bomer then he should wait until after Tisha b'av(the tshuvua speaks about three weeks ...


2

Rabbi Menachem Mendel Poliakoff from Baltimore wrote a sefer about the practices in Lithuania and more importantly, in the yeshivas. In the sefer he says that prior to WWII no Ashkenazi Jew had ever heard of it. In fact, he cites the source as being a pagan one (and proves it from a mishna describing idol worshippers only cutting their hair on one of their ...


1

Nit'e Gavriel has an entire chapter (chapter 12) devoted to this in the volume on תגלחת הילדים הולכתם לחדר וסעודת החומש. I can't paraphrase the whole thing here, but his conclusion is that "by law it's permitted to cut his hair, but the practice is to wait until lag baomer or to cut his hair the day before Pesach".


1

I'll try to explain this (without any sources, sorry!) as best as I can as a practical matter in modern circles in the United States (and elsewhere). First, many non-charedi Orthodox Jews in America maintain older customs. Second, some "neo-Hasidic" (or "Modern-Hasidic") Orthodox Jews (I'm not using any accepted nomenclature, just calling it as I see it, ...



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