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13

If you find that your questions are not being received as they were intended and they were asked with the proper deference (כבוד רבך ככבוד שמים), perhaps you need to ask your question of authorities who are willing to address it, or are comfortable saying they don't know the answer - but may research it. Or, you can ask your question here where you have a ...


11

Among those Rabbis that I know, if/when they are approached by someone who wasn't raised as a Jew but has a Jewish maternal grandparent, they welcome them with open arms as Jews, albeit Jews who have been estranged from their own religion. I have known this to have occurred on multiple occasions (although I was never personally involved in any). It may be ...


10

No, the rabbi wouldn't find it strange. & Yes, he would accepted you at the spot as 100% jewish. And I can tell you from my own personal experience they would be even very happy!


7

Sounds like you have a very complicated situation. This may be a job for a therapist. Again, concepts of "sanctuary for repentance" don't really fit with the vocabulary of Judaism. But for theory's sake: at your average Orthodox Union synagogue, if someone shows up and says "I wasn't raised observant, I was previously married to someone not Jewish and now ...


6

Take a look at this page. This is the summary: In conclusion, you do not recite: Kaddish. Barchu. The additional prayers recited during the chazzan's repetition of the amidah. G d's attributes of mercy. Any of the prayers that are associated with the reading of the Torah. Other than the above mentioned prayers, you can recite ...


6

The way in which The asker claims to have been answered is certainly questionable. I think it depends on who is being asked. With people in general, it probably stems from humans being human. They live by the words of the challenged authority. Their choice of life stye is thus affronted and personally attacked, (in their minds). The appropriate response ...


6

No. You do not have to worry about Marit Ayin. Marit Ayin is when a Jew does something technically permitted, but may cause someone to reason that a different activity is permitted, when in fact, it is forbidden. The classic example of this is hanging wet laundry to dry on shabbat. (Talmud Bavli, Shabbat 146b) Technically, if you washed clothes on ...


6

I was in a similar situation a decade ago. The Rabbi of the orthodox shul looked into my background and accepted me and made me feel welcome. You never know where such things lead and I'm now on the shul's board and am an assistant gabbai. You're halachically Jewish and will be recognised as such. What you do with that is up to you.


5

Rama discusses a similar situation in ShA OC 54:3 where, after reciting Yishtabach, the congregation halted the prayer service for specific Mitzva/communal needs. He recommends in that case for the Chazzan to recite "some verses from Pesukei Dizimra" and say Kaddish "on them". (It seems to me that his specification of "from Pesukei Dizimra" is lav davka and ...


5

Machzor Vitri - page 206 brings a story on Rosh Chodesh which was Chanuka where they took out 2 Sefer Torahs and the person who read the Torah, in error read 4 Aliyos in Rosh Chodesh and the Halacha was determined that had they not taken out a second Sefer Torah they could of just skipped the Chanuka reading, however since the Torah was taken out, if we did ...


5

I asked this question to Reb Dovid Feinstein and he responded 'What? Who's skipping tachnun? Oh you mean by the chasidim'lach. (chuckle) Yes you can say tachnun in the shul'.


4

This article has a fairly detailed explanation of Tircha D'tzibbur. It discusses various places where this is mentioned in the Gemarrah, and which halachot apply as well as practical applications. In summary, according to the article, Tircha D'Tzibbur is an extension of "Ve'Ahavta L'Re'acha" - loving your fellow. I.e. - if you are commanded to love one ...


3

The Shulchan Aruch writes (263:12) that if one is a member of a community/congregation that accepts Shabbos early, he must accept Shabbos early along with them. This is true even if the person doesn't actually daven along with that congregation, and is determined by the time that the shul recite Mizmor Shir (M.B. 261:31). This applies even applies to a ...


3

In the laws of Rosh Hashana The Mechaber mentions that even though a whole year one should not daven with a raised voice on Rosh Hashana it is permitted since people are davening from a Machzor and the noise wont disturb them. The source is PisKei Tosfos in Rosh HaShana. Not the Gemorah itself. That being said the Mishna Brura says that still one should ...


2

I assume he means places where one is allowed to interrupt anyway (i.e., not in the middle of a bracha, pesukei dzimra, birchat shma, shemoneh esrei, etc.) in which case his source is presumably e.g. the Mishna Brurah 65:9 or Yalkut Yosef (Tefillah vol 2, p. 462) where they rule that when the congregation is saying "Aleinu...", one should also say it along ...


2

Significant authorities maintain that tefillah betzibbur [=prayer with a minyan] necessitates that there be ten people actually davening [=praying] together, not just ten people present. According to these posekim, if there are six people davening who are joined by another four who have already davened, the former may recite Kaddish and Kedushah, but they ...


2

This a touchy issue. First there is this publication by Tzeirei Chasidea Viznitz that speaks strongly against those who want to stop the practice of saying Pesukei Dezimro loud and writes that with the exception of the Amidah, davenning is to be loud and so it sweetens judgement: וחז"ל העידו בר"ה (דף ט"ז) דצעקה הוא אחד מדברים המבטלין רוע הגזירה, והפייט ...


2

Tachanun According to Halacha Berurah 131:2, a Sepharadi davening with Ashkenazim needs to say vidui, and the 13 midot. Apparently, he should say the 13 midot with ta'amim (as he would if he were davening alone - 131:9). If it's a Monday or Thursday, he should just say the first instance of the 13 midot. In the other times it appears in the extended ...


2

Let's assume the question is the color of the garment, not the stripes. There is actually some (small) halachic basis for such an argument. (In addition to whatever "soft" concerns about distraction, disruption, or the like.) Rambam's opinion is that if the whole tallit is pink/red/grey/yellow, then the strings (except fo the techelet one) should be ...


2

Mishna B'rura (131:24, Shaar Hatziyun :21) says those who pray in the synagogue's lobby without an aron (cabinet for the Torah scrolls) and teva (lectern) are thereby "drawn after" the synagogue and so skip tachanun if the b'ris will be in the main synagogue (and even if the participants in the b'ris are absent for the service). It seems from his wording ...


1

SA OC 284, MB quotes L'vush who wonders why a complete Navi is not used. Taz and Magen Avrohom hold that even printed on paper and not rolled is good. Magen Avrohom and Eiliya Rabba say that even so a complete Navi is required, and not what is included in the chumash. MB continues: if a printed Navi is not available, there is to be lenient in order not to ...


1

I do not have a copy of Igros Moshe with me so this is from memory. However, I looked it every summer for several years. Rav Moshe Feinstein paskens that bringing in Shabbos early is an individual decision. In fact, a wife can delay lighting candles until the actual zman even if her husband has gone to the "early minyon". He deals with the cases of the ...


1

One source that is relevant to this issue is Rabbeinu Yonah haGerondi (13th c.) on the Rif, Berakhot 4a. There, he brings the opinion of the rabbonim of France that one need not leave one's place of learning in order to pray in a minyan: פירשו רבני צרפת ז״ל שאפ׳ בלא עשרה היו עושין כן מפני שיותר נכון להתפלל יחידי במקום ששם קביעות התורה יומם ולילה ...


1

The Rishonim (Rabbeinu Yehuda Ben Yakar, Rabbeinu Yonah, among others) describe these Kedushos as סיפור דברים, relating what is happening (as opposed to Kedusha D'Amida, in repetition of Shemoneh Esrei, which is our own Kedusha - where we say נקדש, let us be mekadesh). The lines between serve as explaining what is happening - they give the context to who ...


1

The Shaar Hatziyon (591:13) writes that if one is alone on Rosh Hashanah, one should try to daven at the same time as the tzibbur, and davening shacharis when they're doing mussaf isn't good enough. Perhaps one can derive from here that tefillah betzibur must involve the individual and the congregation reciting the same tefillah.


1

The Shulchan Aruch in Orach Chaim in סימן תקמד - דין צרכי רבים בחל המועד says: א צָרְכֵי רַבִּים מֻתָּר לַעֲשׂוֹתָהּ בְּחֹל הַמּוֹעֵד, כְּגוֹן לְתַקֵּן הַדְּרָכִים וּלְהָסִיר מֵהֶם הַמִּכְשׁוֹלוֹת; וּלְצַיֵּן הַקְּבָרוֹת כְּדֵי שֶׁיִּזָּהֲרוּ מֵהֶם הַכֹּהֲנִים; וּלְתַקֵּן הַמִּקְוָאוֹת. הגה: וְדַוְקָא צָרְכֵי רַבִּים כָּאֵלּוּ, שֶׁהֵם צְרִיכִים ...



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