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12

Start by creating a demand. Every time you walk in to any store that sells food, ask "Do you have Kosher food". On subsequent visits, ask about particular foods: "Don't have have the Kosher Pizza made by XYZ?" Try meeting the Marketing Manager or owner and presenting them with a "plan": Create a Kosher Section and see how many extra customers you get, with ...


12

Since it includes Reform and Conservative organizations in its roster. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agudath_Israel_of_America#Positions In 1956 for example, the moetzes issued a written ruling forbidding Orthodox rabbis to join with any Reform or Conservative rabbis in rabbinical communal professional organizations that then united the various ...


11

I have seen some shuls that actually have people sign a formalized contract not to talk during davening and then post that near the entrance to the shul. I think that whatever the approach, the most successful way would be to get wide-spread buy in from everyone first. Any approach that singles people out, even with halachic basis, will have a hard time ...


11

I once visited the Kemp Mill Synagogue and IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY this was the deal they had made: the congregartion agreed not to talk at all during services, and in return the Rabbi agreed to give his sermon after all the prayers had ended (ie after mussaf), thus allowing for those who did not want to stay for the sermon to leave. The vast majority of ...


9

One reason to be "meikel" is that according to R. Moshe (OH 2:29) the shatz must do his silent prayer like the tzibbur, in addition to the repetition. This serves as a rehearsal so that he will familiarize himself with the nusach that he will ultimately recite outloud. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=918&st=&pgnum=205


9

I would think that it is better, if possible, to incorporate group participation for these things as much as possible. However, even alone, one says "ואמרו אמן" and the like. Why? I will quote R' Yaakov Emden (regarding the phrase said at the end of the Amida to conclude "Elokai N'tzor"), but do not assume that I know what he means: .ואמרו אמן - אף ביחיד ...


8

On the verse in Devarim 32:4 הַצּוּר תָּמִים פָּעֳלוֹ, כִּי כָל-דְּרָכָיו מִשְׁפָּט: אֵל אֱמוּנָה וְאֵין עָוֶל, צַדִּיק וְיָשָׁר הוּא, I have heard (do not remember the source) that Hashem is different than a regular ruler. For example - a regular ruler when he punishes a person and puts him in jail for a crime, his wife and children suffer even though they ...


8

Some options: JCCs (Jewish Community Centers) -- these have a wide variety of things going on, everything from lectures to social events to fitness classes; see if there's one where you live. Find the local Jewish newspaper or community web site, which is likely to advertise non-religious events along with the religious ones. My local newspaper ...


8

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


7

They are only bound by the concept of Al Tifrosh Min HaTzibbur since the tzibbur is keeping a minhag that is based on a mitzvah (tosefes Shabbos or to prevent milachah). Once there is more than one minhag in town/shul the problem is gone. Even if the tzibbur only starts early, if they only do so in the summer and only to eat at a normal time and not for ...


7

The Avudraham says that we repeat Vayechulu because we are testifying that G-d created the world in 6 days and rested on the 7th. The Halacha is that testimony must have two witnesses and be said standing, and therefore Vayechulu is said together while standing. The Shulchan Aruch Harav, in his Kuntres Acharon to Orach Chaim 268:12, brings the opinion of ...


6

In Rambam's text of the siddur (printed after the various laws of prayer, blessings, and the like, in the back of his code), he writes: The chazan says each one calls the other, and the congregation answers holy holy holy ... the chazan says by David, your holy anointed one, and the congregation replies G-d shall reign forever. And all the parts that ...


6

There are many sources within Judaism that discuss the obligation to give charity, both in the individual and communal level. The principle Torah source on this issue is Devarim 15: (ז) כִּי יִהְיֶה בְךָ אֶבְיוֹן מֵאַחַד אַחֶיךָ בְּאַחַד שְׁעָרֶיךָ בְּאַרְצְךָ אֲשֶׁר יְקֹוָק אֱלֹהֶיךָ נֹתֵן לָךְ לֹא תְאַמֵּץ אֶת לְבָבְךָ וְלֹא תִקְפֹּץ אֶת יָדְךָ ...


6

I have heard, in the name, if I recall correctly (but it's possible I don't), of Rabbi Avraham Pam (of Torah Vodaas), that there is no benefit in saying bar'chu after maariv after missing at the start, but that it's not a shem l'vatala, as one can technically say bar'chu at any time in the presence of a minyan. I ask in a followup question whether the above ...


6

אינו פוסק לא לקדיש ולא לקדשה אלא ישתק ויכון למה שאומר שליח-צבור ויהא כעונה א"ח קד:ז One who is still reciting the Shemoneh Esrei (i.e. has not concluded Sim Shalom/Shalom Rav) should not respond to the shliach tzibur but should pause and listen quietly (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 104:7). If one has concluded the Shemoneh Esrei proper but is still ...


6

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein's guidance on what to do if your personal text differs from the congregation's (and you're just sitting in your seat, not the chazan) is to say your text for anything that's private and quiet, and the congregation's for anything that's public and out-loud. Rav Moshe then discusses which exact parts of Kedusha fall into which of those ...


6

Have to? I would think not. To cite the Tur, siman 1: וטוב לומר פרשת העקידה, ופרשת המן, ועשרת הדברות, ופרשת הקרבנות, כגון פרשת העולה ומנחה ושלמים וחטאת ואשם. אמנם פרשת הקרבנות טוב יותר לאומרה ביום, שהם במקום הקרבת הקרבן שזמנו ביום. וכשיסיים פרשת העולה, יאמר: רבון העולמים! יהי רצון מלפניך שיהא זה חשוב ומקובל לפניך כאילו הקרבתי עולה בזמנה. וכן יאמר בפרשת המנחה ...


6

I was advised many years ago by one of my Rabbeim to skip it if, as is usually my situation, I would be unable to finish in time to start Shemoneh 'Esreh with the Tzibbur. I was also advised (when I asked someone else several months later) that it is not possible to make it up afterwards - in case you were wondering. I believe the reason for the latter ...


6

I saw it once at my shul on a Sunday morning. After minyan there is usually some people that learn in the beit midrash afterwards. One time, someone came in and had missed minyan. He put on his tefillin and started davening to himself. When he got to Yishtabach, he klopped on the shulchan and finished it out loud and said barchu. Then he continued to ...


6

Harav Musafi Shelit"a says in his lecture (Ana Bechoah) that the entire point is to have the special intentions while reciting the words. However, the Haye Adam doesn't hold of people in that generation (Kal Wahomer now) intending on the Arizal's intention. Of course, as the Ben Ish Hai writes in his Sefer Emunat Atich, before intending the Kabalistic ...


6

About the second part of the question: Yalkut Shimoni (to Esther 4:16) says that he limited the fast to those "found in Shushan" because they were the ones who had eaten at Achashverosh's feast. The Jews in the rest of the empire weren't guilty of that. [That they too were in danger is attributed by R. Shimon bar Yochai (Megillah 12a) to their having bowed ...


6

Yes, there is a source: Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 69. They are doing what is known as "Perisah al haShema" whereby individuals who didn't hear Kaddish, Kedusha and Barchu can make it up with a later quorum. The details about how to do this are complicated and there are many opinions about what can and cannot be made up as well as how many of the people ...


6

The rule of thumb Rabbi Moshe Feinstein applies is to not be disruptive. In communities where it is clearly the standard practice that all men wear tallitot, I would think that doing otherwise would be disruptive and/or disrespectful. (And what's the downside, really?) As for what text you yourself use, as long as you're not too loud, generally people ...


5

The Chayei Adam (31:11) writes: צ״ע אם כלם שמעו קריאת התורה ויש איזה ב״א שלא שמעו אם מותר לקרות עוד הפעם בשבילם ול״ד לפריסת שמע בסי׳ ס״ט דהתם כל יחיד מחויב אותה ברכה אבל הכא החיוב רק שישמע קריאת התורה וחכמים תקנו שיברך משום כבוד הצבור וי״ל דלא תקנו אלא כשכל הצבור חייבין בקריאה אבל לא בשביל יחיד וצ״ע. It seems that קריאת התורה is an individual ...


5

According to Halacah Berurah 133:1 Minhag Yisrael is to say barechu after the last kaddish in Shacharit. According to the Maran Beit Yosef, and the REMA, the reason is to fulfill the obligation of people who didn't hear it already (becuase they came late). For that reason they rule not to say this barechu on Shabbat and Yom Tov, because even people who came ...


5

Tefillah btzibur by maariv takes priority even over semichas geulah ltfillah (saying shema and its brachos before shemoneh esrei), so it obviously takes priority over "baruch Hashem..", which according to many sources should not even be said lchatchilah. I also don't think you should not start maariv early just so as to say "ברוך השם לעולם ", since then ...


5

I have to agree with everything YDK said in his answer - except for his conclusion (which he stated first). My direct answer to the question is, instead, absolutely. The question is, which parts should you skip and when are you considered "caught up"? You should skip parts of Pesukei DeZimra as outlined in the Shulhan 'Aruch (O"H 52:1), in order to catch ...


5

The simple answer is two-fold: The Jews already knew that the decree had occurred, and they were quite upset about ("v'hair shushan navocha"). You can imagine they were paying attention to the local news. Mordechai was the head of the Sanhedrin, a very visible position. Given (1), people were probably waiting for him to make a statement about the ...


5

Your second question is easier to answer: The MB 122:4 quotes the Maamar Mordechai that one who is finished with his tefila, but cannot step back because someone behind him is still in the middle of tefilla, "he may say then even baruch hu uvaruch shemo". It sounds to me like you may go on with other prayers as well, but I cannot say that with 100% ...



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