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The elegant solution is to have the beggar order whatever breakfast he wants, offering to pay for it. Once he's taken possession of the non-Kosher/Chametz food - you now pay his bill for him. There is no problem having him thank you or being aware of your involvement. The point is: You don't buy the food; you pay for it after the non-Jew has bought it. So ...


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no, same reason that if you discovered chometz on pesach you did not sell (must be destroyed). One is not permitted to benefit from chometz and one cannot help but benefit when giving a gift or charity.


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The Talmud (RH 4a) tells us that Tzedaka, like any other Neder, is included in the Biblical prohibition of Bal Te'acher (don't delay paying up your vows). However, unlike ordinary vows for sacrifices for which one does not violate unless they don't bring the sacrifice before 3 consecutive festivals have passed (Rambam Maaseh Korbanot 14:13), the Talmud tells ...


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The short answer to your first question is yes. The short answer to your second question is any income from any source. As explained in When does the obligation of Maaser money begin? ma'aser applies to any income (including an income tax refund). For example, a person getting money from tzedakah is still chayav to pay maaser on that income. That is because ...


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Tsedaka and maaser should ideally be given as one receives income. Nevertheless in a related answer I referred to two sefarim on the laws of tsedaka which allow for yearly clearing of your maaser debts at the longest. Both R Avrohom Chaim Feuer in The tsedakka treasury and R Shimon Taub's in The laws of tsedakah and maaser) allow yearly accounting of ...


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The title of your question speaks of obligation while the text of your question speaks of tradition. There is indeed a significant discussion amongst poskim about the exact staus of maaser. R Avrohom Chaim Feuer explains in "The tsedakka treasury" that some believe it is a Torah obligation (e.g., Yoreh Deah 232, Maharil as cited in Responsa Chatam Sofer), ...


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According to Reb Binyamin Zilber there is no chalos in maaser kesafim and therefore maaser can be given before the income is acquired as long as you know it's coming.


3

As I explain in More Maaser and Tax Math and as can be seen in Maaser Kesafim: Giving a Tenth to Charity this is the equivalent of having made a neder to give a minimum percentage to tzedakah. Thus, one is obligated as soon as the income is received. However, one can maintain a ledger of income as it comes in and tzedakah as it is distributed so that one can ...



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