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13

Rabbi Yitzchak Breitowitz gave a lecture on charity a few years ago, and someone asked him this. He said the key was "providing for those who otherwise wouldn't have." An orphanage or library certainly does that. (He mentioned Catholic charities that have helped Jewish parents adopt a baby, too.) As for arts organizations, he asked if they provided ...


12

We tried all the suggestions given above and they didn't work for the most part. The phone just kept on ringing. I tried this once and it worked so I use it with the persistent ones and it seems to get them off the phone quickly. Caller: I'm calling from__to thank you for your donation of $___..... Me: Thank you for calling! You've saved me a phone call. ...


12

Kesuvos 50a says that you should not give more than 20% in order not to become dependent on others. However Yoreh Deah 249 says that if you can afford it you may give more. The Igros Moshe Yoreh Deah 1, Siman 143 says that in actuality unless it is for Pikuach Nefesh not to give more than 20%.


12

R. Shneur Zalman of Liadi writes (in Iggeres Hateshuvah 3 and Iggeres Hakodesh 10) that the 20% limit applies only to a person who hasn't sinned, or who has done so but then fasted the prescribed number of fasts as atonement. For someone who is giving tzedakah to atone for his sins, though, there is no limit - just as a person will spend all he has in search ...


11

I worked for one of the larger companies that called for various charity organizations. The only way to get them to stop calling would be following this script: Caller: Hi, Mr. Moses, I'm Binny Weiss calling for Yeshivas Mir Tash... You: Who's Mr. Moses?? I'm sorry, you have the wrong number. If you just say no, they will likely be calling you ...


11

Ramban on this verse says that the difference is that the gold from the kumazes was mixed with the rest of the gold, whereas the kiyor was made only from these mirrors, without any admixture of anything else. Moshav Zekeinim (a collection of commentaries from the schools of Tosafos) takes a slightly different tack: the kumazes were melted down and so were ...


10

http://halachafortoday.com/QandA4.aspx A: The Chazon Ish ruled that one who made up his mind to give Tzedaka to a certain poor person who was collecting, and then the poor person disappeared (similar to your case of the organization closing down) you can give the money to a different poor person (or in your case a similar institution) The best ...


9

According to Rambam's Mishneh Torah, Seder Zerayim, Matnot Aniyiim 7:6 (or 7:5 depending on your version): עני שאין מכירין אותו, ואמר רעב אני, האכילוני--אין בודקין אחריו שמא רמאי הוא, אלא מפרנסין אותו מיד. היה ערום, ואמר כסוני--בודקין אחריו שמא רמאי הוא; ואם היו מכירין אותו--מכסין אותו לפי כבודו מיד, ואין בודקין אחריו. Translation from Chabad: ...


9

There is a concept from the Gemara (Pesachim 8a) known as שלוחי מצוה אינן ניזוקין - mitzva messengers are not harmed. When one is going on a trip that involves potential risks, some are of the custom is to give them a small amount of money to give to charity at their place of destination, so that they are effectively turned into "mitzva messengers" until ...


8

According to here: [The twenty percent rule] applies only to someone whose income does not provide generously for his family. Someone who has a job or business that provides adequately for his family is permitted to give everything above his needs to tzedakah even if it is more than twenty percent of his income or his holdings. And from here: ...


8

Aruch HaShulchan 694:2 says that it is clear to him that it does not have to be given directly to the poor man, and can be given through a messenger (Shaliach) on Purim day. Nitei Gavriel Purim 68:6 mentions in the name of the Yad Aharon 694, Chug Eretz 15, and others that if money is given to a messenger (Shaliach) before Purim to give to the poor man on ...


7

According to the Chofetz Chaim (Ahavas Chessed 18:2), this is subject to a dispute among the poskim. In order to avoid this problem, the Chofetz Chaim recommends that when one starts to distribute maaser, he should explicitly say that he is accepting this practice on the condition that he can distribute tzedakah before earning the money. The Tzedakah ...


7

Giving tzedakah: True, if they are claiming to be hungry and asking for food (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 251:10). However, if they are asking for clothing (and possibly for other necessities, including money?), then you should check first to make sure he's not just pretending to be poor. If you're giving tzedakah to a community warden (gabbai) who will ...


7

I think (I'm not a rav) that the credit card charges is just like any other expenses the charity has. and you could deduct from ma'aser the full amount you gave. Of course it's better if you can give with a check. That would save them a few dollars, making a bigger part of your donation go to the charity, but only if you don't have a fundraiser picking it ...


7

We do have indications that #1 could have happened. Doros Harishonim (vol. 3, pp. 139ff) understands Josephus (Wars 7:6:6) to be saying that after the destruction of the second Beis Hamikdash, Vespasian nationalized all property belonging to victims of the war who had left no known heirs. (He also cites Eusebius (4:8 - should be 4:6:1) as saying that the ...


7

Just to add to @DovF's answer. It would seem that making the person your emissary to do any mitzvah would accomplish the same thing, since the main thing is that, as your emissary, he is protected from harm. (see my answer here) However, Tzedakah has an added benefit of "saving one from death", as the Talmud (Shabbat 156B) tells us. So you get the double ...


7

Rabbi Yitzchak Breitowitz discussed this in a tzedaka lecture; it's considered giving to charity, but at 90% the rate. If my legal work goes for $100/hr, and I did an extra hour of work, I'd make $100 of which I'd keep $90 and give $10 to tzedaka. So if instead I donate an hour of my legal work to charity, it's only $90 I'd be seeing in my wallet, hence if ...


6

I can but quote the Mishna B'rura (694:3); CYLOR for a practical ruling: והנה השתי מתנות צריך ליתן משלו ולא משל מעשר וההוספה שמוסיף יוכל ליתן משל מעשר i.e. (my own translation, which you shouldn't rely on): and, lo, he must give the two gifts [to paupers] from his own and not from maaser's, and the addend that he adds he'll be allowed to give from ...


6

Machtzis HaShekel may not be given from Ma'aser money. (Shaalos U'teshuvos Bais Dino Shel Shlomo Yoreh Deah Siman 1. See also Sefer Tzedaka U'Mishpat Perek 6 footnote 37. See also Mogen Avraham Siman 694:1 in the name of the Shela HaKadosh)


6

There are many sources within Judaism that discuss the obligation to give charity, both in the individual and communal level. The principle Torah source on this issue is Devarim 15: (ז) כִּי יִהְיֶה בְךָ אֶבְיוֹן מֵאַחַד אַחֶיךָ בְּאַחַד שְׁעָרֶיךָ בְּאַרְצְךָ אֲשֶׁר יְקֹוָק אֱלֹהֶיךָ נֹתֵן לָךְ לֹא תְאַמֵּץ אֶת לְבָבְךָ וְלֹא תִקְפֹּץ אֶת יָדְךָ ...


6

R' Zevin writes in "A Treasury of Chassidic Tales" page 291: R' Yehuda Tzvi of Rozla was once visited by a Chassid who gave him a kvittel (prayer request) with the accompanying traditional pidyon (money given to a Tzaddik). The Rebbe asked him (rhetorically) how he, the Rebbe, was allowed to receive a pidyon; after all, the money is only given on ...


6

Shulchan Aruch Choshen Mishpat 366:2 says that if someone stole money from an individual and does not know from whom he stole then he should use the money for the public good. Igros Moshe, Choshen Mishpat 1:88, says (in point 2) that one thing he can do is give the money to a mikve. Now, he does say (in point 14) that that should be done in a way that the ...


6

The Rashba (Shut Rashba 1:18) discusses which mitzvot do not have a special blessing recited prior to performing them. He writes: וכן אין מברכין על מצוה שאינה תלויה כולה ביד העושה. מפני שאפשר שלא יתרצה בה חברו ונמצא מעשה מתבטל. כגון מתנות עניים והלואת הדלים ונתינת צדקה והענקה וכיוצא בהם.‏ Similarly, one does not bless prior to a mitzva which is not ...


6

First of all, the Biblical mitzvah of maaser has to do with produce; the contemporary version of the mitzvah, maaser kesafim, where one gives 10% of his income, is a minhag or at least of Rabbinic origin, according to most poskim. The Gemara, at Kesubos 50a, states that one cannot give double-maaser (20% of one's income) if it would cause him to be ...


6

Let's assume the people eating it are all non-Jews. At that point the only problems (that I can think of) are: cooking meat and milk together, and benefiting from meat-and-milk-cooked-together. If you're just doing the dessert, cleanup, or setup, I can't see that as tangible benefit from the main course. (Feeding it to your dog when you would otherwise ...


5

From here (based on Maimonides Commentary on the Mishnah, Avot 3:15) : The Chofetz Chaim, Rabbi Yisrael Meyer HaCohen Kagan, says that this explains how we should give Tzedakah, charity. He says it is better for an individual if he or she gives 100 individual dollars to 100 poor people, than all to one person. This way, one becomes accustomed to fight ...


5

I like Shalom's answer, I did want to clarify something: while certain contributions to a Synagogue would count as tzedaka, regular Synagogue membership dues do not. This post gives also gives a very detailed explanation: http://www.pidyon.com/latest-writings/halacha/10-maaser/48-computing-maaser-how-much-tzedakah-charity-do-i-owe.html


5

Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh De'ah 259:1) says that even if you say (as you do in kapparos) "this money shall go to tzedakah," you're allowed to exchange it. So, "spooky ritual" or not, it would seem that it should be fine to exchange that money for other money; at most, you would have to make a verbal declaration of the exchange (like you do when you redeem maaser ...


5

The Shulchan Aruch Yoreh De'a 247 says that the giver receives great reward.



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