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Yarok here means yellow, as DoubleAA wrote in the comments. As for your question, what is the difference between Yarok and Tzahov, see Rashi on the passuk who says Tzahov is similar to gold. So now we have two colors in the yellow family, one we'll call yellow which is pure, and one which we'll call a golden yellow which is impure. See also Tosafos Succah ...


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Rav Ozer Alport addresses this question in his weekly parsha sheet. "The Shaarei Simcha answers that people who are well-known for their evil ways will have a difficult time trying to ensnare innocent, unsuspecting victims. On the other hand, those people whose wickedness is concealed represent a much greater threat. One of the purposes of tzara'as is to ...


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The first verse is about a hair being changing. It is a case that an event occurred, like an illness. Torah describes the phenomenon and do not addresses the issues of relationship with any "mechanism". וְרָאָה הַכֹּהֵן אֶת הַנֶּגַע בְּעוֹר הַבָּשָׂר וְשֵׂעָר בַּנֶּגַע הָפַךְ לָבָן וּמַרְאֵה הַנֶּגַע עָמֹק מֵעוֹר בְּשָׂרוֹ נֶגַע צָרַעַת הוּא וְרָאָהוּ ...


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I've never learned the mishna (or maseches) in question, and am basing this solely on your description and my experience with kal-vachomer arguments elsewhere in Shas. With that caveat: The argument seems to be this: white hair, which easily renders a person tame (namely, even in the presence of other hair), nonetheless fails to render a person tame unless ...


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Their sin was too great for tzaraat and therefore they were punished with death. The general principle is that if a bigger punishment is given the lesser one is withheld. For example someone who sets fire to an object on Shabbat and gets stoned to death for it does not have to compensate the damage too. You might be asking, why not tzaraat "instead" of ...



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