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8

The Iggerot Moshe (Helek Bet Hoshen Mishpat 47) writes that if you have a bug, and it bothers you, you may kill, but preferably not by hand. He says there is no ISUR. Since there is no problem in killing a bug, I would assume since Saar Bale Hayim Deorayta, I would assume that you should kill him. EDIT: I asked a big Talmid Hacham, and he said according to ...


7

There are a number of opinions that state that catch and release is forbidden halachically on account of צער בעלי חיים - causing the animal pain. For example, according to the Rav Menashe Klein, Zt"l - Mishneh Halachot - Choshen Mishpat - Chelek 12, Siman 432, it is asur (forbidden) to fish for sport if the fish will not be used for food, and even if the ...


7

It is discussed at length in Siman 20 of Yore De'ah. Essentially the shochet needs to cut through the Trachea, Esophagus, carotid artery and the jugular vein. Both of these shield the esophagus and trachea at the place where the cut is to take place. This would lead to a fairly quick bleed out with the animal becoming nonsensical in a matter of seconds. ...


5

It would seem not from Trumas haDeshen P/K 105. The case in the end where he brings achzarius seems to be talking in a case where there were tamer options. Dead worms just won't catch fish. Although if your going for lake trout, mini-marshmallows work great!


5

In SHU"T(questions and answers) Siach Yitchok(יור''ד סימן שפ''ז) SHU"T Pikudas Elezer(סימן ס''ז) In reference to scaling the fish while alive he answers NO.He brings a proof from a Pri Megadim in the name of the Chinuch that the reason that Schechting needs a knife with no blemishes is because of Tzar Balay Chaim and since fish do not require Shechting ...


5

There is a prohibition of harming a human being, including inflicting pain (even without lasting damage). That's straightforward. The question is as follows, if someone/something is already (unfortunately) suffering: When do we say that pain and suffering alone, assuming no danger to life or limb, override a Halachic prohibition? or in Yeshivish, When ...


5

Rav Moshe Feinstein has a great responsa in which he says that if it gives you pleasure you may hunt. Fish are generally considered to be lower life forms in that we grant fish fewer halakhic protections (for example eiver min ha'hai does not apply to fish). Though Rav Moshe does say in his responsa that it is not something that he thins is great to do it ...


5

http://www.dinonline.org/2011/09/13/cruelty-to-animals-halachos-of-tzaar-baalei-chayim/ Elsewhere, however (Shabbos 128b), with regard to the laws of muktzeh on Shabbos, the Gemara states that the prohibition is a Torah law. Where an animal has fallen into a pit, and cannot be fed, one may assist it to ascend by placing cushions under it. Although ...


4

According to Shulchan Aruch even Hoezer (very end of Siman 5), "anything that is for Refuah (healing) or for a purpose does not carry the prohibition of Tzar Ba'alei Chaim, therefore is would be permissible to pluck feathers from a living duck (I guess to use for a quill - mz) but the Minhag (custom) is to refrain from this because it is Achzoriyos ...


4

Reb Moshe in Iggras Moshe (חושן משפט חלק ב' סימן מ''ז) says if it is disgusting and or the creature ruins food,or mosquitoes who bother the person the answer is YES. Reb Moshe in an Illustration of his Tzidkus (righteousness) adds of course you should try not do it by hand instead with fly traps and the like because killing by hand desensitizes you and ruins ...


4

For #2: Rambam says as much in Moreh Nevuchim, part 3. In ch. 26 he writes (Kapach translation, text online here): אבל לאמיתו של דבר, כיון שהביא ההכרח לאכילת החי, הייתה הכוונה להקל מיתתו במה שקל להשיגו, לפי שאי אפשר להכות הצוואר אלא בסיף או כיוצא בו. והשחיטה אפשרית בכל דבר, ולהקלת המיתה הותנה חדות הסכין. And in ch. 48 he repeats this idea: וכיון ...


4

The Rambam (Hil. Pesulei Hamukdashin 4:1, from Temurah 15b ff) points out that this is a law given to Moshe (ודברים אלו כולם מפי משה רבנו נשמעו). He may be stressing that point in order to explain how indeed the rules for treating such animals can override the rule about avoiding tzaar baalei chaim. [It's actually a matter of dispute as to whether the ...


3

Tzaar baalei chayim is usually measured by the ratio of animal pain to human gain. I guess the gain is considered high/necessary enough here? The Noda BiHudah says directly killing the animal in any normal sort of way, e.g. deer hunting, is not considered tzaar baalei chayim per se. But yes, starvation is more problematic.


3

Once again, you're approaching this the wrong way. We have a very broad and deep legal system - Halacha - that covers most cases. Temple-hair wigs -- the question isn't "we shouldn't buy it because I don't like how they made it." The question is that the Torah says to get rid of anything (in your possession) connected to idolatry, including items ...


2

Tza'ar ba'alei chayim concerns practices that physically or (perhaps) psychologically hurt the animal. Aside from the possible case of a female animal in heat, not mating does not appear to cause distress to animals. Anecdotally, Judaism 101 reports a story of an Orthodox pet owner giving a pet birth-control pills and asserts that this would not be a ...


2

This website says (I think it's a book): אולם חיי בעלי חיים אינם יקרים כל כך, והעיקר הוא שלא לגרום להם צער. לכן אדם שיש לו חתול או כלב שסובלים ממחלה קשה, או שנפגעו על ידי מכונית, ואין להם סיכוי להבריא, וניכר עליהם שהם מתייסרים מאוד – במצב כזה עדיף להמיתם בדרך שאינה מכאיבה כדי למנוע מהם צער וסבל. If an animal is badly injured and they are in intense ...


2

Rabbi Yissochar Frand has a tape on inflicting pain to animals. Generally the prohibition is on inflicting pain for no good reason, and legitimate medical research is a good reason. He quotes a responsum -- I believe it's the Shvut Yaakov -- about a doctor testing a medicine on a dog or cat first, who allowed it, but said it's ideal not to do the procedure ...


2

Gensis 1:28: וַיְבָרֶךְ אֹתָם, אֱלֹהִים, וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם אֱלֹהִים פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ וּמִלְאוּ אֶת-הָאָרֶץ, וְכִבְשֻׁהָ; וּרְדוּ בִּדְגַת הַיָּם, וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם, וּבְכָל-חַיָּה, הָרֹמֶשֶׂת עַל-הָאָרֶץ.‏ And God blessed them; and God said unto them: 'Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it; and have dominion over the ...


1

I would assume that's considered not excessive infliction of pain, for a reasonable need. I don't have the source off-hand but I recall hearing that it's permitted to cut off a rooster's comb to prevent it from fertilizing hens at your egg farm. (The Torah prohibits traditional castration, but this was believed to make the rooster unattractive to females ...


1

I'm not answering halachickly but logically. If there is an avaira for hurting a squirell then certainly a human who is created B'tzelem Elo-kim should be much worse. I would think hurting a human is tzaar baalei chayim-we are baalei chayim. Like i said this is not the halacha!!!!! Please correct me if i am wrong.


1

If this is a Jewish-owned store, and working for them facilitates the sin, it is probably prohibited to work there. BUT You should find out if the Tza'ar being committed in the store is in fact halachically impermissible. There are many valid situations where the tza'ar is permitted. If this is a non-Jewish store, I don't know of a source that prohibits ...



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