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The Shulchan Aruch (OC 131:6) brings down the minhag not to say tachanun on Tu Beshvat. It is quoted earlier in the Beit Yosef in the name of the Rokeach (Siman 312 in the Rokeach according to the Beit Yosef but I don't see it there). The Beit Yosef (quoting the missing Rokeach) says the reason is because it is the Rosh Hashana for trees. The Gra on the ...


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Nitei Gavriel Hilchos Purim 2:8:13 mentions this in the name of Minhagei Vermasia 211 that on the 15th of Shevat the children would not go learn with their Rabbeim.


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See this link to chabad who explains this well. http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1109802/jewish/Why-Eat-Carob-on-Tu-BShevat.htm There are more reasons,but have to find them.


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I believe it may appear in the Netiei Gavriel? Anways, some say that on Tu B'shvat, you should pray for a good esrog, some 7--8 months from now. The reason is straightforward enough, as I understand it: Tu B'shvat is the new year (Rosh Hashanah) for fruit trees, so you pray now that the fruit tree that will produce your mitzva fruit (i.e. esrog) later this ...


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1) Check the Star-K's guide to insect checking, appropriately named: http://www.checkforinsects.com/ 2) Here is a Tu Bishvat guide for this year (5771), based on the sefer of R' Moshe Vaye: http://www.jerusalemkoshernews.com/wp-content/uploads/shvat_5771_english.pdf.


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Tu B'Shvat appears first in Mishnayos Rosh HaShana as one of the four Rosh HaShanas. The first of Shevat is the new year for trees, according to Bais Shamai, however according to Bais Hillel the fifteenth of Shevat. Fruit trees use Tu Bishvat as the cut off date in the Hebrew calendar for calculating the age of a fruit bearing tree. The Halachos of Orlah ...


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I spoke to an elderly Jew who grew up in pre-war Poland who said the custom in his town was that only the wealthy could afford fruit on Tu b'Shvat and the one fruit of choice was a pineapple which he said cost a week's salary. So at least in some places, the answer was one. I personally haven't seen this custom as common today.


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You can buy plain pearled barley in the grocery store, usually near the dry beans. Many people use it for cholent. You can certainly cook that up plain as a starchy side dish, and you might be able to roast it. Are you hoping to eat it raw? For wheat, it looks like the product you're looking for is called "wheat berries." I've never shopped for them, but I ...


3

Sefer Chemdas Yomim from Rabbi Binyomin HaLevi in Tzefas brings down the Seder in the following links http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=288 http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=289 http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=290


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According to here: It is said in the name of Rabbi Chaim Vital that one should endeavor to eat thirty different types of fruit on Tu Bishvat: ten different fruits which are eaten in their entirety, ten fruits of which only the interior of the fruit is eaten, and ten fruits in which only the exterior is eaten. Other kabbalists teach that only 15 different ...



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