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In Hebrew טעם (or הטעמה) also means "stress" in the linguistic sense. טעמי המקרא fundamentally indicate the stress to be given to syllables in each word in relation to its nikud. See: https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/הטעמה


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The one you've probably seen before is Genesis 28:9. The others are scattered in more obscure parts of Nakh: Samuel 1:14:3 Samuel 1:14:47 Samuel 2:13:32 Kings 2:18:17 Isaiah 36:2 Jeremiah 4:19 Jeremiah 38:11 Jeremiah 40:11 Ezekiel 9:2 Haggai 2:12 Chronicles 2:26:15. It also happens twice before a Pazeir: Daniyel 3:2 Nehemiah 8:7.


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As there hasn't been a lot of answers for Sephardi Nusach, i will post all the resources i have found for Sephardi sources: Egyptian Nusach: Ahaba, Shaarei Shalom, Orah Saddiqim, Karaites.org The Ahaba website is from an Egyptian synagogue in New York. There are many recordings and videos here. Many. There are several years' worth of Seder Tawhid, an ...


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This is very very good. great choice of reading, cantilation, words, music. many combinations This link is in English This is a non-free program called Kol Kore to learn kriat hatora, all the options of nussach (at least 4) are present. It is for 4 NUSSACHAOT (ashkenazi Israeli, Ashkenazi Litay, Sfaradi Yerushalmi, Sfaradi Marokay). Very useful for ...


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If you're willing to trade voice quality for a larger set of trop systems, take a look at Trope Trainer. It has a mechanical voice (not a recorded human voice) that you can use to hear any portion in any of a couple dozen trop systems. (You can also change the voice's pitch and speed to match your own voice, for people who are using this software to ...


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I don't know about CDs, but you can use these great online resources! Chabad.org offers recordings of all the Torah readings, according to the Lubavitch custom, of course. They are awesome and very educational. Plus, if you want to learn trope yourself, please see this website: Learn Trope. I believe the trope they teach there is the traditional Ashkenazi ...


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Actually, tipcha is a bigger break than tevir, and even bigger than revii (even though many people don't read it that way). The side of the Tikkun Simanim points out places where it makes a difference to the meaning. One major case is in Reeh 12:2. A more recent place, where it's simpler to see the meaning although I don't think the Simanim says anything ...



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