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7

I had a script run through mechon-mamre's text. There are four verses with four, and none with more than that. (Actually, two of the verses are essentially a statement and its echo.) They are: II Samuel 17:9 הִנֵּ֨ה עַתָּ֤ה הֽוּא־נֶחְבָּא֙ בְּאַחַ֣ת הַפְּחָתִ֔ים א֖וֹ בְּאַחַ֣ד הַמְּקוֹמֹ֑ת וְהָיָ֗ה כִּנְפֹ֤ל בָּהֶם֙ בַּתְּחִלָּ֔ה וְשָׁמַ֤ע הַשֹּׁמֵ֨עַ֙ ...


7

Trop marks are traditionally always placed on the accented syllable EXCEPT Yetiv and Telisha Gedola which are always on the first letter, and Telisha Ketana, Pashta, Zarka, and Segol which are always on the last letter. In those words, you have to just know where the accent goes. (Many printers nowadays print a second trop mark on the accented syllable in ...


6

In Ashkenazi cantillation, the demarcation of the end of a recitation unit is technically no different than the end of any other verse vis a vis the cantillation marks themselves. There is therefore no strict requirement for them to be pronounced differently. However, it is a widespread custom that the concluding words of a recitation unit (whether a ...


4

There is no one answer for this question. Because there seems to have been three distinct developemtns for the Cantillation: Ashkenazim, Old Mizrahim, and Modern Sephardic. The Ashkenazim are noted as being the first to develop musical motifs for all of the cantillation symbols. This makes the most sense since Europe was very focused on writing down music, ...


4

I have used and found excellent the book Chanting the Hebrew Bible by Joshua Jacobson. It comprises a background/history of the subject, a detailed grammatical treatment (one-by-one introducing the disjunctive te'amim and their function; introducing the relevant conjunctive te'amim with each disjunctive; diagrammatical syntax trees; examples; exercises), a ...


4

That word is always pronounced with emphasis on the second-to-last syllable (mil'el) and is past tense. (If it had a prefixed vav and were mil'ra (emphasis on the last syllable), it'd be future tense. Maybe that's what you're thinking of.) The segol cantillation mark is always written on the last letter. Most copies of Chumash follow the standard practice ...


4

Here is a partial answer. Shaarei Zimra says that there are 5 locations total in Tanach with these two combinations. Two you mentioned. 3 - Melachim2 17:13 שֻׁבוּ מִדַּרְכֵיכֶם הָרָעִים 4 - Yechezkel 48:10 וּלְאֵלֶּה תִּהְיֶה תְרוּמַת הַקֹּדֶשׁ 5 - Tzefania 2:15 זֹאת הָעִיר הָעַלִּיזָה Over here he explains why we sing the Gayrshayim first however I do ...


3

The issue is not just whether something is or is not a prayer, but also whether it is a דבר שבקדושה. The Beit Yosef brings (OC 565:5) in the name of Rashba that an individual (not in a minyan) shouldn't say the 13 Attributes in the context of בקשת רחמים (requesting mercy), since that is a דבר שבקדושה (learned from the gemara on Rosh Hashanah 17b). However, ...


3

The Rama (OC 142:1) rules that a mistake which changes the meaning must be corrected, while [mere] changes to the vowels or trop should [post-facto] only be complained about. The Mishna Berura there clarifies that the Rama is using vowels and trop as examples of things which don't change the meaning because they usually don't, but if they did then they ...


2

This is only a partial answer (in that I don't know the original sources) but such a custom is mentioned in Matteh Efraim 584:18 (by R. Efraim Zalman Margolios, 1762-1828 Brody, Ukraine) and the Aruch Hashulchan 584:3 (R. Yechiel Michel Epstein, 1829-1908 Belarus). I assume that the reasoning is the same why we would change the tune for tefillah: to reflect ...


1

The rules are complicated, but three of the more obvious explanations are (a) the syllable preceding the tone is open; (b) the word is compound, and/or (c) elongated words will require extra cantillation for the purposes of fuller melody. Reference: Wickes, William (1887). Two Treatises on the Accentuation of the Old Testament. Oxford: Clarendon Press, ...


1

According to Idehlson the Sephardim/Mizrahim of older times did not have melodies for all of the te'amim. This could mean that as time went on the different communities started mixing and bringing additional melodies to each other. Source: Idehlson's Thesaurus of Oriental Hebrew Melodies Volume 2



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