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6

From Webster Dictionary Latin tropus, from Greek tropos turn, way, manner, style, trope, from trepein to turn First Known Use: 1533 The most common Hebrew term I have heard for this is טעמי המקרא. Interesting to note that both terms seem to focus on different aspects of what "trope" is or does. The Latin root has a definition meaning "style", and ...


5

The following is based on Chanting the Hebrew Bible, by Joshua Jacobson (as well as experience leining, but note that my experience is with American and British leining; other Ashkenazim might have other minhagim). The only time the munach gets the shaky trope is when it's a munach-legarmei, which visually looks like a munach followed by a psik. The ...


5

Based in my Mesora - which I got from my father: The special tune starts before the Shira. It is already used for Posuk 14:29 - the Posuk before וַיּוֹשַׁע וְהַמַּיִם לָהֶם חֹמָה, מִימִינָם וּמִשְּׂמֹאלָם Note: this phrases is already mentioned in Pasuk 22 - but there it is sung normally. Then comes the actual Shira, where each Posuk with Hashem's name ...


5

Indeed, in a number of places here in Israel, Tehillim are read publicly on a daily basis from Tehillim scrolls written on parchment. According to many authorities, there is also a special bracha that is to be recited prior to reading material from Ketuvim out of a parchment scroll: ברוך אתה ה' א-להינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וציונו לקרוא בכתבי הקודש ...


3

Here is a link to a Drasha from Rabbi Moshe Wolfson Shlita on this topic.


2

As always, please consult your rabbi for a practical ruling. There are several issues here. Does "Leining" count as "singing?" Is the fact that she's reciting Tanach make a difference? Is there an issue of Kavod haTzibbur? Are there any other mitigating factors? 1) The Rama (O.C. 75:3) and Bait Shmuel (21:4) state that this prohibition applies ...


2

There is an ashkenazi trop for Tehillim, Mishlei, and Iyov (טעמי אמ"ת) but it was reconstructed from the Sephardic tradition. KAJ in Washington Heights chants Tehillim 29 with that trop on Friday nights. You can buy software to learn Ta'amei emet, and find sample mp3s from the software here.


2

There was an Ashkenazi Tehillim trop mesorah, but it was lost about half a century ago: R' Yisroel Rabinovich of Monsey, NY, is a master baal koreh and baal dikduk. He told me that as a young Yerushalmi boy, he met the last living man who knew the Ashkenazi cantillations for Tehillim. Unfortunately, at the time, neither R' Rabinovich, nor anyone else ...


2

I have an answer to 1 and 3. The trop in the haftara beracha serves as a warm up so the layner can adjust to the haftarah trop after using the different torah trop. When I read the after beracha, I do read it with a tune just as I read the before beracha.


1

I sifted through a number of sites, and all, seem to give a "D'var Torah", so there doesn't appear to be anything "authritative". However, this article seems to give the most "direct" answer, I think: As to the future – that can found in just one word. The word is ‘ba’ama’ and occurs several times in chapter 35 verse 5. It is a measurement and in ...


1

I once read Megillat Esther privately to an elderly student of R Ahron Solveichik who could not attend a public reading for health reasons. Before he recited the blessings he told me that R Ahron Soloveichik once reported to him that his grandfather, R Chaim Soloveitchik, believed that the blessings attached to the Torah readings are part of the Mitzva of ...


1

Wow, I was fascinated by the question, so I looked it up... First, an introduction of a central concept: There is a disagreement that wends through the Talmud (like Sanhedrin 4a,b) regarding the words of a Torah scroll whether "Yesh Aim leMikrah" or "Yesh Aim leMesoret". Roughly translated, that means "Primacy is given to how it is read" or "Primacy is ...



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