Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

It's amazing what you can find on Hebrewbooks!... In Sifsei Chachamim, by R' Avraham Abba Hertzel (Bratislava, 1899), he says that this is based on the Gemara's statement (Megillah 15b, top) that "that wicked man had all of his treasures engraved on his chest" (evidently meaning that he wore a medallion, or something similar, that had all of his possessions ...


12

Stuff that grows by itself on public property is exempt from the rules of orla. Source: Radvaz's commentary to Rambam, Maaser Sheni 10:6 (though it's pretty clear from the Rambam himself, 10:5).


12

Answer to question regarding benefiting from the fragrance of blossoms of an orlah tree: The Radbaz (Shu"t 1:44) discusses this topic and rules that, if the tree was not planted for its fruits or if only the blossoms are present and the fruit has not yet grown, the fragrance is permitted (i.e. there is no problem of orlah preventing enjoyment of the ...


11

The Lubavitcher Rebbe brings this idea in Likkutei Sichos (vol. 36 pg. 75 - free translation): The ultimate purpose in creating the Tree of Knowledge was not merely to serve as a test to Adam HaRishon that he should not eat from it, but rather for man to transform the Tree of Knowledge and elevate it above the concept of death. It is explained in ...


9

Sounds like you are referring to this מדרש רבה במדבר פרשה ג פסקה א "ר תנחומא מעשה בתמרה אחת שהיתה עומדת בחמתן ולא היתה עושה פירות והיו מרכיבין אותה ולא עשתה פירות אמר להם דקלי תמרה היא רואה מיריחו והיא מתאוה לה בלבה והביאו ממנה והרכיבו אותה מיד עשתה פירות כך כל תאותן וצפויין של צדיקים הקב"ה the gist is that there was a tree which would not produce ...


8

Etz is Biblical Hebrew; ilan is Rabbinic. Also, etz is ambiguous, since it can mean "tree" or "wood." Thus Rashi (to Gen. 18:4) finds it necessary to gloss תחת העץ as תחת האילן, to make it clear that Avraham was inviting his guests to rest under the shade of a tree rather than under a wooden canopy or something similar.


8

The basic rule is that if the two types to be cross-grafted are similar either in the shape of their leaves or the appearance of their fruit, then it is permitted to crossbreed them. There are some exceptions to this, such as if the taste of the two fruits is very different. (Rambam, Hil. Kilayim 3:4ff) Applying this rule, then, to your cases: Rema (Yoreh ...


8

The translations I have seen translate it differently, and effectively elide the vav; either קניניו refers to the rest of Haman's household, or to the fact that his sons were his dearest possessions. From Koren/Sacks: His many sons and his household You hanged on the gallows. From Artscroll: His numerous progeny -- his possessions -- on the ...


8

The Shulchan Aruch OC 202:6 discusses the bracha on a caper bush[1]. The caper has multiple edible parts including leaves and berries. The Shulchan Aruch says the berries get a HaEtz because they are the main fruit ("Ikkar HaPeri") and the leaves get a HaAdamah. The Shaar HaTziyun sk 41 says the reason the leaves still get a HaAdamah is because the capers ...


8

Another answer (suggested here in the Sefer "Kerem Efraim") is that because the tree was created through a miracle, it was not obligated in Orlah. He brings support from the Radak (Malachim Beis 100:4) who writes that the oil that was miraculously created for the wife of Ovadia did not require Maaser to be separated from it. He explains that for the first ...


7

At the 2014 International Bible Contest for Adults (חידון התנ"ך הבינלאומי למבוגרים תשע"ה) televised finals1, celebrated grammarian2 Dr. Avshalom Kor (אבשלום קור) posed this question among a series of short vignettes about "Ma'oz Tzur" that he presented while the next contestant was getting into place. He answered that the 'ו' preceding "his possessions" is ...


7

The source for this is Torath Kohanim 26:5 [ה] מנין שהעץ עתיד להיות נאכל? תלמוד לומר "עץ פרי"; אם ללמד שהוא עושה פרי, והלא כבר נאמר "עושה פרי"!? אם כן למה נאמר "עץ פרי"? אלא מה פרי נאכל, אף העץ נאכל. BTW, I think that your statement "as in Gan eden" is incorrect. Rashi on Bereshit 1:11 clearly states that the trees didn't do like Hashem ...


7

See here Rambam (Melachim 6:8) writes that if the tree is causing any type of damage, one may destroy it. While the Kaf Hachaim (YD 116:85) writes that one shouldn't destroy a fruit tree to build an extension, most poskim allow one to (See Rosh, Bava Kama 91b; Aruch Hashulchan ibid; Yabia Omer ibid). R’ Ovadia Yosef (Yabia Omer YD 5:12:5) ...


6

Perhaps you can break it up like this (M'layl)- you wiped out the enemy of his name (including) his many children and possessions, you hung him on a tree.


6

In Riv'vos Efrayim (volume 8 number 267), Rabbi Efrayim Greenblatt suggests that it may refer to Haman's slaves. (He also refers the reader to Or L'avraham on Rus, by Rabbi Avraham Gurewitz (spelling?), page 98; but I don't have a copy.)


6

It does not matter how high the tree is, if the Succah is under the tree it is not Kosher. Orach Chaim 626.


6

Per the Tzitz Eliezer 12:20-6 you may say the Bracha at night so long you can properly discern the tree.


6

Thanks to Alex's comment elsewhere (which I only saw now), I discovered the Pische S'shuva, YD 294:13, who cites Parach Mate Aharon as saying the soil must last three years, and Shivas Tziyon as qualifying that that's only in eretz Yisrael: in chutz laaretz, he says, [where safek orla is permitted,] the soil must last "a few days".


6

I'm afraid the bracha you are referring to is only on the blossoms that lead to fruit on the fruit trees. See Mishna Berura OC 226 sk 2 There is another bracha on nice 'creations' (including trees) but it generally accepted that it is only recited on the most beautiful creation you have ever seen till now. Since we can not measure 'beauty' very well, we ...


6

The Rebbe Rashab explains in his Kuntres Eitz Chaim (Chapter 10): Kabbalistically the Tree of Knowledge refers to the Divine attribute of Malchus, and the Tree of Life refers to the attributes of Ze'r Anpin. Malchus is the source of the false feeling the world has that it is an entity which enjoys seemingly self-sufficient existence, as if independent of its ...


6

In the discourse "Bila Hamaves Lanetzach" (printed in Sefer Hamamorim Melukat vol. 2 pg. 277) the Lubavitcher Rebbe presents the following question: Before the sin of the Tree of Knowledge man was supposed to live for ever. It was only as a result of the sin that death was introduced to the world. If so why did G-d banish Adam from the Garden of Eden, "Lest ...


5

The Pitchei Teshuva in Yoreh Deah 294 sk 13 quotes a number of opionions but rules that in Israel where we rule stringently about doubts relating to orla, there must be enough dirt to survive three whole years; in the Diaspora, however, where we rule leniently about such doubts, it only needs to be enough dirt to last a couple of days. h/t Alex


5

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/961313/jewish/Cutting-Down-Fruit-Trees.htm http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5763/shavous.html It applies all over.


5

It applies to any productive object that is destroyed for a non-productive purpose. Rambam Melachim 6:10


5

Rashi's understanding is only one, as Michoel said, of the "70 faces of Torah". The syntax of this pasuq is inherently ambiguous, and it is not clear whether the correct reading of the verse is as a rhetorical question or a statement. Ibn Ezra explains that the Torah is in fact equating people and trees: ולפי דעתי: שאין לנו צורך לכל זה וזה פירושו כי ממנו ...


5

Pesachim 111b - If one steps over a [fallen] palm tree - if it was cut down, he will be killed; if it was uprooted, he will die. If he put his foot on it, there is no problem. doesn't say about sitting but this is probably the root of that statement. Furthermore, I was told that all the demons were banished by the maharsha, so this does not seem to apply ...


5

Verse 3:22 would seem to indicate the former: וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים, הֵן הָאָדָם הָיָה כְּאַחַד מִמֶּנּוּ, לָדַעַת, טוֹב וָרָע; וְעַתָּה פֶּן-יִשְׁלַח יָדוֹ, וְלָקַח גַּם מֵעֵץ הַחַיִּים, וְאָכַל, וָחַי לְעֹלָם Here, עץ החיים is not modified with בתוך הגן, so evidently that is not part of its name, but rather a geographical indicator.


4

The bracha can be made from the time the tree starts to bloom, regardless of the month (Mishna Berura quoting "Acharonim"). Lechatechita it should be said before the fruit grows. The Mishna Berurah sides that, bediavad, if you did not see the blossoming and the fruit started to grow, you can rely on those who say you can make a bracha until the fruit is ...


4

The Griz answers with another question. Where is the Halacha that you have to eat בקדושה ובטהרה (in purity)? The question is the answer the fruit referred to in ונאכל מפריה must be talking about מעשר שני Masser Sheni which Halachicly must be eaten in Yerushalayim (NOT GROWN) so ונאכל מפריה is talking about מעשר שני and the Halacha is it must be eaten ...


4

After CYLORing this, the answer I got is: If the tree is planted exclusively for beauty - there is no problem to enjoy from the fruits during first 3 years, and even to eat them. If the tree is planted also for eating the fruits - it is forbidden to enjoy from the fruits, even from observing (להתבונן) their beauty. However, there is no problem just to look ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible