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11

"I davka haven't seen that movie." I purposely haven't seen that movie. or I specifically have NOT seen that movie. "He doesn't eat peanut butter, b'shita" He doesn't eat peanut butter, on principle. (or "as a matter of principle"). "Mamash" in proper Hebrew usage should translate as "tangible"; that works sometimes. "He's mamash the ...


7

If I'm not mistaken, Dayan Gukovitzky's Targum HaLaaz has a transliteration guide. It seems that Rashi did have a specific set of rules for doing this.


6

Like many Anglicized versions of biblical names, the name Balaam comes through the Greek language of the Septuagint, which renders בלעם as βαλααμ. The reason the Septuagint spells it so differently from the Hebrew MT may either be due to limitations of the Greek language to accurately represent Hebrew, changes in the way Greek and/or Hebrew vowels were ...


6

It may be under the influence of German (where z represents the sound /ts/, so it's unavailable for this purpose). The first director of Merkos was R' Chaim Mordechai Aizik Hodakov ע"ה, who in the '20s and '30s was the principal of the Torah Im Derech Eretz school in Riga; and one of Merkos' early influential employees was Dr. Nissan Mindel ע"ה, who had ...


4

The definitive work on this topic is Frumspeak, by Chaim Weiser. You might also find the Wikipedia entry on Yeshivish to be enlightening, and perhaps humorous too!


4

"Beseder" OK "Gevaldik" Great "It was bizyonos" It was embarrassing (Givaldiger bizyonos would be greatly embarrassing. Are you catching on?) "I can't be masig why he'd do such a thing." I can't fathom why he'd do such a thing. "Lchoyra it was because it wasn't shayach." Presumably, it was because it wasn't possible. ...


4

According to the system discussed in Sefer Torat HaSofer which primarily follows the workings of the Israeli Rabbinute, the answer is no. However from practical experience I have also found that Batei Dinim in different cities will at times have their own customs when it comes to transliteration. This is found more commonly in Gittin where the language ...


3

Here's nusach Sefard (or maybe Sephardi?): http://atase-bilbao.blogspot.com/2009/05/amida.html And here's a harder-to-read version with both nusach sephard and Sephardi nusach: http://shalomhaverim.org/conversion10.html For Kabalat Shabbat prayers, check out a this Spanish siddur with translation and transliteration: ...


2

I'm not sure why prayers would be different from any other Hebrew text. There are various standards of transliteration for Hebrew, including one (popular in academic literature, from what I understand) that uses: ʼ b g d h w z ḥ ṭ y k l m n s ʻ p r š ś t corresponding (respectively) to ‭א ב ג ד ה ו ז ח ט י כ ל מ נ ס ע פ ר שׁ שׂ ת‬ ...


2

I almost burst out laughing at the question in the title. After reading the full question, I have to say that it's obvious you put some serious thought into this. Unfortunately, I think there is no standard way to transliterate Hebrew into English, even within traditions. ך can be transliterated "ch" or "kh" or "h"; ת can be transliterated "t" or "s" or ...


1

The cool speak for see you later is shpayterz. A bit like laterz. Shpayter is yiddish for later. Hence proper yiddish gangster talk. Also, the traditional greeting is "A giten" to which you can respond "A giten", "A besseren" or if you're feeling a little peeved, "An ergeren". Which transalate as "A good one", "A better one" and "A worse one" respectively.



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