New answers tagged

0

Let's first clarify that the literary device "Read not..." is an attempt to discover the layers of meaning in the word; it is not intended to invalidate in any way the accepted pronunciation. (Artscroll Siddur) The Torah is written without vowels; vowels are actually a fairly recent innovation. So why was the Torah given without vowels? Doesn't that leave ...


1

See Ramban on this verse: כי לא יחדל אביון מקרב הארץ. מפרשים [1]‏ אמרו שלא יחדל האביון מקרב הארץ באחד מכל הזמנים כי לעולם יהיה אביון בארץ שגלוי היה לפניו שלא יעשו מה שאמר להם כי לא יהיה בך אביון אם שמוע תשמע בקול ה' אלהיך לשמור לעשות את כל המצוה ‏[2]‏ ואינו נכון לדעתי כי התורה תרמוז במה שעתיד להיות אבל לא יתנבא עליהם בפירוש שלא יקיימו התורה ...


1

'For the poor shall not cease out of the midst of the land'-- Undoubtedly, (and sabbahillel correctly noted), this means 'forever'. 'Shall not cease' is the literal translation; however tendentious it may seem, this is what G-d said. As for predestination, Judaism's view of prophecy is described in Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) 18:5-10: וַיְהִ֥י דְבַר־יְהוָ֖ה ...


2

I'm not sure if this is the exact page you're talking about, but here is something I found that was posted by another Mi Yodeya user on another Yiddish answer:


4

One technique that ought to help would be to consult a translation that includes a commentary that explicitly shows the sources behind each translation choice that's a matter of diverging interpretations and especially, that indicates explicitly any time the chosen translation deviates from the plain meaning. Then, you will at least have one translator's ...


1

Firstly, it would seem that is an obvious mistake to think that the translation derived from the Haggada is literal. But if someone says the answer is yes, he has someone to line on, we cannot just deny that. Despite the great number of posts on the pshat of this verse "ארמי אובד אבי", I want to give my own contribution to understand that nothing is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included