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9

According the Chida, who says it in the name of the Rokeach (Brought in Vedibarta Bam): According to an opinion in the Gemara (Gittin 43a), when one sells a Jew as a slave to a non-Jew, he is fined to redeem him for up to 100 times his value. In the Torah we find a slave to be valued at 30 silver pieces (Shemot 21:32). Since Yosef was sold as a slave to ...


8

There are a lot of factors involved, but starting with one of the more basic ones: Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 243:1ff) rules that if the store is known to belong to a Jew and that it's not the kind of business that is typically sublet to someone else, then it is indeed forbidden to have non-Jews work there on Shabbos, because then it becomes apparent that ...


8

You can try one of these shiurim. Firstly, ask your rabbi. It may very well be the kind of place a good Jewish boy (or girl?) just shouldn't be hanging out. Leaving aside the danger of losing a lot of money very quickly. There may even be Chilul Hashem concerns. The Aruch HaShulchan refers to gambling as a blight that has destroyed many lives. I don't ...


7

Me'am Loez says (citing Zohar Chadash, Eichah) that R. Eliezer is counted among these ten Sages. He was arrested and nearly sentenced to death, but was miraculously spared (Avodah Zarah 16b-17a); he thus corresponds to Reuven, who played a part in the whole drama but wasn't actually involved in the sale.


7

I would assume it depends on what's considered a normal form of transaction. If any action is recognized by society as a form of transaction, halacha recognizes it -- this is known as kinyan situmta. But Rambam and Shulchan Aruch rule that if you use "word alone" to commit to buying or selling (without any language of oaths), "though you have made no mark ...


7

As a limud zchus (a line of reasoning to judge others favorably for their actions) Rav Vosner, as I understand it, says it is possible that this doesn't fall under the category of assisting a transgression since it is possible that the clothes will be worn in such a way that they are not actually immodest (i.e. layered) or because one is not participating at ...


7

Halachah distinguishes between two kinds of indirect damages: g'rama, for which one is exempt from court-imposed penalties or repayments (although he is still liable to Heavenly judgment until he makes good the loss); and garmi, for which a court of law can hold him liable. (Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 386) What distinguishes g'rama from garmi is ...


7

Premarital sexual intercourse is not a kinyan unless it is done with the intention of being koneh. Not only that, but the man must say as much. Rambam Hil Ishus 3:5 (my own translation): ואם קידש בביאה אומר לה הרי את מקודשת לי או הרי את מאורסת לי או הרי את לי לאשה בבעילה זו וכל כיוצא בזה. ומתייחד עמה בפני שני עדים ובועלה If he betroths (mekadesh) ...


7

Rabbi Reisman in Hilchos Ribis deals with this. If you are going to spend the money, then that is defined as a loan and any fee for that 'rental' is 'ribis'. Renting property means that you return the same property that you rented, such as renting a tractor to plow your field. That is why there is a discussion as to borrowing flour to make a cake and when, ...


6

There is a source for transferring a curse. When Rivka tells Yaakov "alai kilelascha bni" (Toldos 27:13), some mephorshim translate this literally. For example, Seforno proves that you can accept someone elses curse from Shlomo Hamelech who accepted Yoavs claim that he cannot get both Dovid's curse and death, so Shlomo accepted the curse and then ordered ...


6

Read this Shi'ur by Menachem Leibtag. http://www.tanach.org/breishit/vayesh/vayeshs1.htm Here's a teaser for it: "After throwing your brother into a pit to die, would you be able to sit down to eat? Yosef's brothers did, as the Torah tells us! However, the Torah does not tell us if they sat near the pit, listening to Yosef's screaming and pleading, or if ...


6

The poskim discuss the case of a person who separated challah with a b'rachah and then did hataras n'darim to nullify the separation (and therefore will have to separate again). Is the person's b'rachah considered l'vatalah? The Chasam Sofer says it was not l'vatalah, possibly based on the S'dei Chemed, Vol. 6, p. 320. But the case of the tallis may be ...


5

See summary on TorahMusings.com. Partially quote below. ...Ramban and Sforno hold that the Ishmaelites and Midianites were working together. The brothers sold Yosef to them, and they sold him to Potiphar in Egypt. Ibn Ezra says that the Ishmaelites and Midianites were the same people... Rashbam, [et.al] say that the brothers didn’t sell Yosef. ...


5

Abarbanel, though not a halachic source, mentions that if the seller does not have the means to redeem his property, a wealthier relative of his (his goel), should buy it back from the buyer "to return it to the seller," implying that ownership immediately reverts to the original seller.


5

I've found where the Chida talks (in Chayim Shaal 1:74:6 and in Birkei Yosef, Yoreh De'ah 113:7) about "roasted peas" (אפונים קלויים; in Birkei Yosef he calls them קודאמאס) "that come from Tunis to Livorno," as to whether Bishul Akum applies to them. (The uncertainty is because in Tunis they are an important food, fit to be eaten by the nobility, "while here ...


5

אוצר דינים ומנהגים pages 137-138 discusses this. It does not diffrentiate between Chutz LAretz and Eretz Yisroel.


5

Monica, I cannot speak for those who give cash (or any gift) on Yom Tov as this is considered a business transaction and is rabbinically forbidden as a safeguard of the labor of writing. But there is more leeway to talk about the transaction on Yom tov. Transferring an object to another's possession is definitely a violation of business activities. ...


5

This is most certainly "a thing": Shopping Bag One should preferably not put meat and dairy foods in one shopping bag. Meat and dairy foods may drip on one another. The wrappers of packaged meats may be fatty and touch other foods. Cottage cheese and yogurt containers may open and spill. (The Laws of Kashurs, Rabbi Binyomin Forst, page 361) I have ...


5

Rabbi Shlomo Kluger in Sefer HaElef Lecho Shlomo Siman 221 has a very similar question where the non Jew was taken prisoner over Pesach how to purchase back the Chometz. He proposes a way to purchase it back in front of Bais Din. I do not know if this same solution would apply to a case where the non Jew passed away.


5

Tosafot in Avoda Zara, 2a s.v. אסור answer this question. (By the way, not every one agrees to the "three days" thing Avodah Zara 7b.) A: because of איבה, i.e. if Jews never did business with Christians before their holidays this would cause undue hatred of Jews. However, the Tosafot reject this, because there is no hatred, because the Jew could just say ...


5

For the general rule, Shulchan Aruch Yore Dei’ah Simon 117 reads like this (parentheses are RaMah): “Anything that is forbidden by Torah law, even if it is something that one may derive pleasure thereof, if it is something specifically for food – it is forbidden to do business with it (or to borrow against it. Even to buy it to feed it to his non-Jewish ...


5

It depends on what you mean by "use," because the mode of use (both actual and contractual - see Shach YD 176:1) affects whether the money is considered "loaned" or "rented." In a loan, the money is generally meant to be used financially and may be replaced with equivalent currency. In such a case, the laws prohibiting lending on interest apply. However, if ...


4

There are Halachic problems with entering a church, and even with using a former church building for some other purpose. (Rabbi Frand has a tape about converting a church into a synagogue.) So if the social hall is part of the church building, that's one whole set of issues. If it's just a free-standing social hall that happens to belong to a church, we ...


4

It's a machlokes (dispute among) rishonim. See a talk by Rabbi Josh Flug, and the sources he cites, if you're interested in the machlokes, but I'll note that among Rabbi Flug's points are that Rashi holds purchasing suffices and that Rambam seems to hold it does not; CYLOR if you're interested in the practical halacha.


4

I heard in the name of Rav Yosef Chaim Sonenfeld Zatzal that Haman wanted to give Achashveirosh the money in order to eventually be able to overthrow Achashveirosh. When the people living in his kingdom would see that Haman has paid Achashveirosh for the right to kill the Jews, they would all be concerned, "Perhaps someone will come up with enough money to ...


4

If the non-Jew has children who knew about the sale, since according to Torah law a non-Jew inherits his father automatically - they just buy it back from the son. But if he had no children OR they didn't didn't know of the sale in which case the Chometz is Hefker then the Mahrsham permits the Chometz to be eaten after Pesach. All this is a synopsis of ...


4

It's actually not so much because of practicality, but because the prerequisites for Yovel are that all Jews are living in the land of Israel, and each tribe in their designated territory. (So even if all of the land were under Jewish control, there's still the fact that almost no one knows what tribe they're from. See the discussion in the comments here.) ...


4

The halacha by lulav an esrog (as codified by the Shulchan Aruch OC 648:4) is that I can give it to my friend as a present on condition that he return it, and through that it is considered that he owns it for that time period, and he thereby fulfills his obligation with it. However, if he fails to return it in time it retroactively was never his. In this ...



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