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perhaps it is referred as that being the beginning of matan torah, and is called so for its purpose. as rav shimshon Raphael Hirsch says in "chorev" as to the meaning of sefiras ha'omer, that were counting to matan torah as that is the purpose of yetziras mitrayim.


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Rambam writes in Hil. Talmud Torah 3:14 that learning out loud facilitates memorization, whereas silent learning breeds forgetfulness. כָל הַמַּשְׁמִיעַ קוֹלוֹ בְּשָׁעַת תַּלְמוּדוֹ, תַּלְמוּדוֹ מִתְקַיֵּם בְּיָדוֹ; אֲבָל הַקּוֹרֶא בְּלַחַשׁ, בִּמְהֵרָה הוּא שׁוֹכֵחַ This strongly implies that one does fulfill ones obligation to study Torah, for if not ...


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Rav Yosef Yozel Horwitz the Alter of Novahrdok (1847–1919) already cites it in his talks compiled in the Sefer Madreigas Ha'adam in Darkei Habitachon (chapter 13 s.v Vezeh Lashon Harambam)


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See the Sefer Yisroel Veorisa who writes that it refers to the measurements people set for themselves. The Achronim write to set a measurement in chummash, mishnah etc. It seems that people had set times to hear a daily or weekly shuir so it got that name.


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There are three general categories of understanding this Rambam. The obligation to teach one's child is limited to Torah SheBeksav (note, if there is a Rabbinic requirement to do it, the Rambam doesn't mention it according to that reading). The father's obligation to pay is limited to Torah SheBeksav, he just has to teach himself (or arrange others to ...


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The Mishna says at the end of Avos: "Delve into it [the Torah] and delve into it for everything is in it."


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This question seems to be predicated on the assumption that one only fulfills the mitzva to study Torah through study of the Written Law, or at least a special mitzva with study of the Written Law. (This may indeed be the case see here). The question is then whether a translation of the Written Law counts as the Written Law itself (or perhaps the Oral Law). ...



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