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1

Nitai Gavriel (Hilchos Chag HaSukkos 98:10) brings this custom as existing in several communities. This was permitted because the joy in celebrating the completion of the Torah. The Nitai Gavriel himself says that this should only be done in those communities where this is the established custom. Otherwise, one should be more strict, and if they need to do ...


1

I don't think so because the Gemara in Megillah (3a?) names specific authorized Targumim for Chumash and Navi.


4

I have been a gabbai and the way I was trained was יעמוד בני יוסף without mentioning my own name. That is also the way that I have seen other gabbaim do it. When my sons who are gabbaim mention their children in a mi shebeirach (as an example) they also say 'Bni Ploni' or 'Biti Ploni' without using ben or bas and their names. When they call up their ...


1

What I've always seen done was יעמוד בני יוסף בן שמעון where the Gabbai is Shimon.


0

The Spanish-Portuguese custom is uncommon, in that sifre tora are not placed in cases, but covered with jackets. The second sefer is held by someone who sits on the teba. However, unlike Ashkinazim, there is a qaddish when the reading is finished in each, i.e., the second sefer is not brought to the reading desk until after qaddish is said, then the first ...


1

The full expression (at least in the Spanish-Portuguese custom) is "hazaq ubarukh tihye" (yes, that "b" is beth without daghesh, as is standard in Spanish-Portuguese Hebrew pronunciation). The challenge is that we do not know whether it is "be strong (verb) and be blessed" or "be strong (adjective) and blessed". In the former case, the heth would have the ...


4

Maftir is not considered one of the 7 "main" aliyot of the parsha. Technically, the entire parsha has been read and maftir is, usually, a repetition of the last few verses of the the weekly reading. When another Torah is used for maftir, it is a similar idea. The main parsha has been read, and maftor is an extra aliyah. Therefore, a Cohen may be called. This ...


-1

Never. According to the older customs found in German and Spanish/Portuguese schuls, Berich Sh'meih should not be said. I have also heard that it was not said in Lithuania prior to recent centuries. In a more practical approach for most schuls where it is said, I have seen it both ways, although before removal of the sefer Torah is by far more common.



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