Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The Mishnah in Tractate Megillah, Chapter 4, discusses the laws concerning "Holy Scrolls" which are read during Shabbat and the holidays. It is presumed that the "Holy Scrolls" were written in Hebrew. This tradition of reading the Torah in Hebrew likely goes back to the prophet Ezra, and may extend even further than this. So it is unlikely that a Jewish ...


2

Had it been that the one reading out of a chumash reads first, and afterwards the other reads out of the Torah, it should be fine. See Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim siman 141 siff 3. For clarification, see the Biur Halacha who ends up explaining that the Makrei is the one reading out of a chumash, and the Olah is the one reading the Torah. He starts off by ...


7

The Mishna Berura (142:8) describes this practice and recommends it if no one in the shul knows how to lein. Note that later commentaries on the Mishna Berura (I don't have this in front of me at the moment, so I can't quote the source) clarify that the reader must still look at every word inside the Torah - otherwise it is not considered reading. ...


2

Megillas Ester is actually the only exception to the normal rule that you must hear only the voice of the reader (OK, Hallel also, but no one fulfills Hallel by listening nowadays). Megillah 21b: תנו רבנן בתורה אחד קורא ואחד מתרגם ובלבד שלא יהא אחד קורא ושנים מתרגמין ובנביא אחד קורא ושנים מתרגמין ובלבד שלא יהו שנים קורין ושנים מתרגמין ובהלל ובמגילה ...


2

אמן יתומה typically means waiting too long to respond to Amen after berachah has been given. I think your case is similar to אמן יתומה since it is an Amen which is not connected to any berachah. The focus of your Amen during a real aliyah is that you are sharing the beracha with the oleh. Originally, each oleh read his own aliyah, and so he said a beracha ...


9

I don't know about whether such a practice technique is permissible, but I'd recommend against it for other reasons. Unfortunately, due to Torah-readers' habit of singing "Amen" as an introduction to their reading, they sometimes end up delaying this response until too long after the blessing it's responding to. (The response is supposed to be "immediate" ...


1

"Amen" is not necessarily a word attached to a bracha - i.e. - ones starting with "Baruch atah Hashem...". Some examples: When you are practicing laining parshat Ki Tavo, and you read Devarim 27:15-26, you are saying "Amen" 11 times. Have you answered "Amen" when someone gives you a bracha (e.g. - a rebbe or friend wishes you and your family long life)? ...



Top 50 recent answers are included