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The practice among the Kohanim that I know is to leave from before the Yisroel is called up until after he starts Baruchu. Then they come back. If they come back before that, they may need to get the Aliyah and the Yisroel held that Bimah until the third Aliyah. Source - observed practice (I was the Yisroel in that situation many years ago - and that is ...


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The source for those who begin one verse earlier is the Eishel Abraham of Butatach (Siman 138) who explains that this is because the custom is to chant the verse "Eicha Esa Levadi" in the same tune as Megillas Eicha and it is therefore considered a "tochecha" (reproach) and we do not begin an Aliyah negatively. See also the Likutey Maharich (3:52:1) who ...


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Sefaria has an API that will serve it up as a JSON object.


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Mechon Mamre's "תיקון קוראים" (also downloadable) has each word of the Pentateuch in a separate span element; pasuk-final words have different attributes in those elements. This is thus a machine-parseable Pentateuch with machine-parseable delineation of p'sukim, which seems to be what you seek.


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From personal experience, here's what the Sofer thinks about, while writing: It's Lishma - and watch out for names of Hashem that need individual attention to become Lishma. Don't smudge, it's wet ink all around! Is there enough ink to finish the word? Don't drip when refilling the quill. Double check that you didn't overfill and risk a flood. Don't miss ...


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I'm not sure how to answer this question for anyone but myself. The barest minimum requirement for writing a sefer torah is that it be legible. The ink must be black, and the traditional fonts pretty much require all the letters to be very bold. In that sense the sofer does not have to worry about usability because halacha and minhag do the worrying for ...


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O Ch 284 (4) starts with the words that someone under barmitzvah (age not specified) can say the maftir. The source is a gemoro in Megilo 23a.


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A suggestion which I admit is not totally supported by the quoted source. www.torah.org has an article on tefillin from which I abstracted some lines which might be put together to justify the policy of your shul. In short I am thinking that the shul might think that to read from the Torah one needs a clean body (guf noki) and that someone not wearing ...


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To answer your question as briefly as I can, during a leap year where Rosh Hashannah begins on Tursday and the year is "Chaser" - "Deficient" meaning 383 days long, then Pesach begins on Sunday, and there will be 55 Shabatot in total. I am also assuming that we are talking about Galut readings, as Israel readings have slightly different rules. We have 54 ...


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The Rivevos Ephraim 2:98 holds its a hefsek and he should not be the Baal koreh for this aliah. Halachicly speaking has alot of sources on this,including this one.


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From all the Ashkenazi shuls I have been to the custom is that the congregation rises right before the conclusion of the sefer(1 of the 5) and upon completion the congregation says chazak ,chazak,vnitchazek,and then the Baal koreh says it then the oleh says the bracha.


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There is a concern that the congregation might come to think that the Brachos said before Torah reading are written in the Torah, but closing the Torah and then opening it would take extra time (see Megillah 31a). Therefore, the Rama (139:6) writes that it is best to turn one's head away from the Torah while making the Beracha. Once one is turning his head, ...


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This seems to be a Masoretic quirk. The Masorah (in the "Damascus Keter") for that verse notes this unusual occurance and lists the other places in Tanakh where שבת is punctuated this way. [The word] Shabbat [thus punctuated appears] 4 [times]. And their mnemonic: Vehayta Olat Lehakhin Kodshecha. And all [instances of the phrase] Shabbat Shabbaton [are ...



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