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8

To answer your question as briefly as I can, during a leap year where Rosh Hashannah begins on Tursday and the year is "Chaser" - "Deficient" meaning 383 days long, then Pesach begins on Sunday, and there will be 55 Shabatot in total. I am also assuming that we are talking about Galut readings, as Israel readings have slightly different rules. We have 54 ...


6

They would take out a separate Sefer Torah and read the curses, in addition to the standard weekly parshah. Source: I heard it directly from a well-known rav, who based it on the Rambam Hil. Tefillah, 13:1-2.


5

From all the Ashkenazi shuls I have been to the custom is that the congregation rises right before the conclusion of the sefer(1 of the 5) and upon completion the congregation says chazak ,chazak,vnitchazek,and then the Baal koreh says it then the oleh says the bracha.


5

In the sefer Ishei Yisrael pg 423, the author cites the Ketzos Hashulchan siman 25:14 that if one prayed alone then one should read the parsha from a chumash. He then cites in the next halacha (from Mishna Brurah 143:9, and Orach Neman seif 7) that in a place (yishuv) where there is no kosher sefer Torah then one person from the minyan should read from a ...


4

First, if you don't yet understand how the main trope "sentences" work, it'll help if you learn those. If you're memorizing tropes one at a time (mercha... tifchah... etnachta... tevir...), you're doing a lot more work than if you recognize the first three as an etnachta clause sans munach. This is the difference between learning to read text a letter at a ...


4

The Rivevos Ephraim chelek 5:584:3 writes that, since if one misses one word of krias megila they are not yotzei (Mishna Brurah 690:5), accordingly it seems that certainly by parshas zachor which is a Torah obligation if one misses one word he is not yotzei: like the Sefer Mikraei Kodesh siman 7 writes, it isn't any lower than megillah. Therefore one should ...


4

You can find good scans of Baer and Delitszch's Masoretic Bible at: http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22Baer%2C+S.+%28Seligmann%29%2C+1825-1897%22 Wish they'd turn Bereishis (https://archive.org/details/libergenesis00baer) the right way up!


4

The HaEmek Dovor explains unexpected dageshim as an intensification of the meaning. Thus, in Gen 43:26 he says that: the dagesh in the Aleph indicates the strength of the bringing, to show that each one tried to present the gift with their own hand rather than have one or two of the brothers bring it on behalf of all of them. This was in order to show ...


4

There is a concern that the congregation might come to think that the Brachos said before Torah reading are written in the Torah, but closing the Torah and then opening it would take extra time (see Megillah 31a). Therefore, the Rama (139:6) writes that it is best to turn one's head away from the Torah while making the Beracha. Once one is turning his head, ...


4

O Ch 284 (4) starts with the words that someone under barmitzvah (age not specified) can say the maftir. The source is a gemoro in Megilo 23a.


4

From personal experience, here's what the Sofer thinks about, while writing: It's Lishma - and watch out for names of Hashem that need individual attention to become Lishma. Don't smudge, it's wet ink all around! Is there enough ink to finish the word? Don't drip when refilling the quill. Double check that you didn't overfill and risk a flood. Don't miss ...


3

It's very common in some of the manuscripts - for example, the codex of the Prophets from the Qaraite synagogue in Cairo, which was written by Moshe ben Asher. There, it features in every the occasional consonantal aleph (and might therefore be understood to be a mappiq). This is generally considered to have been a feature of the Palestinian vocalisation ...


3

There actually is a schedule, though nowadays it is not very well known. A full listing of the where each section in Nakh (the Prophets and Writings) begins can be found here. These sections, known as סדרים sedarim, are marked in old manuscripts of Tanakh with the letter ס. There are 295 such sections in the link above, leading many to beleive that this ...


3

As noted in the question, the torah is divided up into portions and read in its entirety over time (either one year or three years, depending on local practice). This is not true for the rest of the Tanakh; while parts are read on a regular basis, other parts are never read in synagogue (though they of course are studied in other contexts). Each weekly ...


3

@MonicaCellio's answer is great; I would just like to add my personal experience. Now that I've been laining for a while, my process has changed, but back when I was learning everything for the first time, I would break the laining into chunks. I used half-column chunks, but you can do whatever size works for you. There is no better substitute than simple ...


3

The Minchas Elazar (Shu"t Minchas Elazar 1:66) discusses this case, and suggests as follows: For Parshas Bechukosai, where the curses are closer to the beginning of the Parsha, the Baal Koreh can get Cohen, and read until after the curses. For Parshas Ki Savo, where the curses are closer to the end of the Parsha, they should make the earlier Aliyos ...


2

I have been in a Shul where the Torah reader was a Levi and they made the curses Aliya into Acharon.


2

One way to solve this would be to make sure somebody diligent [and somewhat aggressive] is given a Tikkun/Chumash which highlights these things, and have him correct you when needed. The Simanim Tikun comes to mind. If you want as few corrections as possible, highlight those few instances that are critical in the Chumash/Tikun you give him.


2

One thing you can do is ask the gabay rishon (chief gabay) if the person standing on the other side of the bima (table) can be a person of your choosing instead of or in addition to the usual gabay sheni (vice-gabay; or instead of no one) and pick someone who you know knows grammar and will correct you. I've done this one the rare occasion that I was reading ...


2

Rabbi Dovid Stein of Beit Kenesset Chatam in Rehovot has a large group of deaf people come and read Parshas Zachor from the torah every year. Meaning that each individual comes to the torah and reads for himself. Presumably this is because "krias hatorah" needs to be just that - reading from the torah, and sign language is not considered to fit into the ...


2

I'm not sure how to answer this question for anyone but myself. The barest minimum requirement for writing a sefer torah is that it be legible. The ink must be black, and the traditional fonts pretty much require all the letters to be very bold. In that sense the sofer does not have to worry about usability because halacha and minhag do the worrying for ...


1

A suggestion which I admit is not totally supported by the quoted source. www.torah.org has an article on tefillin from which I abstracted some lines which might be put together to justify the policy of your shul. In short I am thinking that the shul might think that to read from the Torah one needs a clean body (guf noki) and that someone not wearing ...


1

The Rivevos Ephraim 2:98 holds its a hefsek and he should not be the Baal koreh for this aliah. Halachicly speaking has alot of sources on this,including this one.


1

Although it is unlikely given the power of most commonly available lasers, it is possible to damage the klaf using a laser if you had a high powered laser. Some may not like the idea of using a laser since it is moving away from the ancient tradition of using a yad, which is considered to hiddur to the Torah in the same way that all the Torah adornments are ...


1

@Msh210's answer is completely correct! If you would still like a book, I would refer you to an entire book on the subject: The ohs and ahs of Torah reading: a guide to the kamatz katan in the Torah. There should also be an explanation in any good Hebrew or Biblical grammar book.


1

This seems to be a Masoretic quirk. The Masorah (in the "Damascus Keter") for that verse notes this unusual occurance and lists the other places in Tanakh where שבת is punctuated this way. [The word] Shabbat [thus punctuated appears] 4 [times]. And their mnemonic: Vehayta Olat Lehakhin Kodshecha. And all [instances of the phrase] Shabbat Shabbaton [are ...


1

The laws are brought in O Ch 146 (2) MB [8] and [14]. MB[8] allows one to learn quietly and to do “shnayim mikro v'echod targum” during the communal Torah reading as long as there are ten people who are paying attention to the reading. So under those circumstances it is “just a good thing to do” to listen and certainly not a sin to “study the ...


1

I assumed it was a matter of a reference to the holiday of Sukkos, not to a Sukkah. Exodus 34:22: וְחַג שָׁבֻעֹת תַּעֲשֶׂה לְךָ, בִּכּוּרֵי קְצִיר חִטִּים; וְחַג, הָאָסִיף--תְּקוּפַת, הַשָּׁנָה And thou shalt observe the feast of weeks, even of the first-fruits of wheat harvest, and the feast of ingathering at the turn of the year. The ...


1

I have witnessed in Chabad Shuls where the Baal Koreh was a Cohen, that a Yisroel volunteered to take the aliyah without being called up.


1

According to Machzor Vitri the Shliach Tzibbur says ......אל ארך אפים ורב חסד ואמת and the congregation responds with ......אל ארך אפים מלא רחמים. This is done immediately prior to opening the Ark for the reading of the Torah. This would indicate that the placement did not change. However the question remains why do we say only one or the other.



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