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7

Keset HaSofer, by R Shlomo Ganzfried, discusses the laws of writing as a Sofer STaM. Topics include: how to make Kosher parchment, shapes of the letters, intent when writing, what sorts of corrections are permitted, prohibition of erasing God's name (among other things). Online at Hebrewbooks.org here. Minchat Shai, by R Yedidya Nortzi, discusses the ...


6

The trick here is the cantillation on the previous word. If the cantillation is conjunctive (and the ultimate syllable is open), then the dagesh will drop. If the cantillation is disjunctive (ie pausal) then the dagesh will stay. In your cases, we have two Munachs (a conjunctive note) and one Tipcha (a disjunctive note).


6

This question is discussed in the Bavli (Megillah 30a) and while one opinion recommends reading from Shemot 30:17 to the end of the Parsha, and then reading Shekalim at the end, the conclusion is in accordance with the opinion that we read the whole Parsha and then go back and read the Shekalim section again.


5

The letters בגדכפת take a Dagesh Kal at the start of a word, unless they follow a word ending in אהוי. There are four major exceptions to this rule when the Dagesh Kal is there even after a word ending in אהוי, the first of which (called "Mafsik") is when the previous word had a pausal Trop note on it. So in Gen 18:5 or Jos 5:14 where the phrase means "No, ...


4

It's clear that the main requirement on Shabbat, Mincha, (same for Mon & Thurs morning) is A. To read a minimum of 10 verses(except 9 when it closes the topic, such as with the reading about Amalek on Purim which starts and ends in 9); and B. To have only 3 people read, not 4. (Which is done on Rosh Chodesh.) If an error occurs as stated, we do not ...


4

i have read regarding this question of yours that the Tradition in Yemen was that in every family, on the Friday night preceeding the Sabbath, the father would teach his sons the weekly Parashath with te'amim, and have them read it back to them, teaching them all the melody and the wording. So that way when the child was of Bar Miswah age, he was already ...


4

This article from Daily Halacha by Rabbi Eli J Mansour discusses the case where the torah service started with a minyan and then somebody left. In that case, he writes (without citing sources, unfortunately): This Halacha [referring to continuing after you've started the first aliya] applies only if a Minyan was present when the first Oleh began ...


4

It's possible to run into a situation in which you have no choice but to double up. For an extreme example, suppose you have a minyan of exactly ten men, and it's a Shabbat on which you take out three Torah scrolls. Then, your Torah service honors include seven regular aliyot, maftir, opening the ark, two Torah-carriers, three hagbahas, and three gelilas, ...


4

So, I asked a Rov and got a few answers: By the golden calf, the party lines were split cleanly. When Moshe Rabeinu called out מי לה׳ אלי, all the Leviim came forward and nobody else did. (Whatever amount of participation there was, that announcement and response shows something) Over here, there were many people from Shevet Reuven involved, so it wasn't a ...


3

Yes. I've been in a good number of orthodox synagogues in which the same person took out the Torah scroll and received an aliya. These include Young Israel of St. Louis (Mo.), Agudas Israel of St. Louis (Mo.), Agudath Israel of Madison (Brooklyn, N.Y.), and Beth Avraham Yoseph of Toronto (Ont.).


3

The law is in shulchan aruch orach Chaim 490 I guess that it is the same reason that we are strict to say shehechyanu (and do everything) on the second day as on the first day (since we live by the calander now lasy people might say it is not the same as the first day and we can do what we want) As the shulchan aruch harav 490.1 sais ... יבאו ...


3

To publicize that it's rosh chodesh. Rama, OC 48. (Everyone already knows it's yom tov by yom tov morning. MB there, citing the L'vush. And on Shabas, as you mention in the question, we don't read the verses from the Torah scroll, so we recite them earlier. SA there.)


3

I asked this question to one of my Rabbeim when I was a teenager. His response was "We do not want to finish an Aliya with the name of an Avoda Zara וַנֵּשֶׁב בַּגָּיְא מוּל בֵּית פְּעוֹר therefore Levi goes until Sheni and then we give the Yisrael from there".


3

I believe that the answer is NO, they are not forbidden and my reasoning follows. Thank you Eliezer for enlightening me ! The Rambam states: “All tameh people, even niddot, even a gentile, are permitted to hold a Torah scroll and read from it, for the words of Torah are not susceptible to tumah.”(Hilchot Sefer Torah 10:8) Not only may people in the status ...


3

The Rama (OC 142:1) rules that a mistake which changes the meaning must be corrected, while [mere] changes to the vowels or trop should [post-facto] only be complained about. The Mishna Berura there clarifies that the Rama is using vowels and trop as examples of things which don't change the meaning because they usually don't, but if they did then they ...


3

I have never heard of a name that refers specifically to the category of "maftir readings that are not from the weekly sedra," and I do not believe that such a name exists. In my experience, such a reading is usually just referred to as a "special maftir reading" (as you mentioned in your comment). Addendum I will try to clarify some of the confusion ...


2

I think it's all different ways of interpreting the Halacho as it's quoted from מסכת סופרים פרק י"ד הלכה י"ד - which is probably the earliest Mekor. יד. מיד גוללין (גולל) ספר תורה עד שלשה דפין ומגביהין (ומגביה) ומראה פני כתיבתו לעם העומדים לימינו ולשמאלו ומחזרו לפניו ולאחריו שמצוה לכל האנשים והנשים לראות הכתב...‏ The Shulchan Aruch quotes it in ...


2

According to this (It's a Google book, on p. 154 - in case link has a problem,) the first use of the Torah pointer in Europe was in Northern Italy dating back to the 15th century.


2

The earliest reference to its use is in connection with the schools of Bethar before the destruction of that place in the war of Bar Kokba (132-135). http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/15047-yad


2

Strictly speaking the Torah should be read only in the daytime. But since the scrolls have already been removed from the Ark for the processions, some argue that there ought to be a reading so that the Torahs have not been taken out in vain. The Rema says in his glosses to the Shulchan Aruch, “Each place follows its own custom”. Where the reading does take ...


2

My great uncle when leading the family Seder always said 'Arbang mi'yodeya' etc (as well as 'ki lau no'eh' and bimhighrow yivneh besau b'kaurov'). Our family background is Anglo-Jewish since about 1740 and before that from yekkish/Dutch forebears) and my grandmother's transliteration of the Shema started 'Shemang'.


2

The Mishna Berura (685 sk 18) only recommended this practice for Parashat Zakhor, seemingly because it may be a biblical obligation (ShA OC 685:7). Betzel HaChokhma (6:50) said this applies to any readings being used to fulfill the Mitzva (eg. on Purim morning, if someone missed Zakhor). Ketzot haShulchan (3:84:13 footote 22) said to read one way in Shvi'i ...


2

On a weekday, this question is a non-starter: the onen is prohibited from making any blessing at all. (Shulchan Aruch Y.D. 241:1) On Shabbos, when the onen is permitted to attend the synagogue, Rebbi Akiva Eiger (to Y.D. 241:1) believes that he is nevertheless prohibited from getting an aliyah, as he is not allowed to study Torah. (I'm not sure if this is ...


2

In terms of the Oleh, the Magen Avraham (OC 566 sk 2) writes that reader needs to repeat these lines aloud after the congregation says them because the congregation only said them "Derekh Bakkasha" by way of supplication, not as part of the reading of the Torah. The Elyah Rabbah (ibid.) and the Mishna Berura (ibid. sk 3) in their presentations makes clear ...


2

I decided to get the Simanim tikkun. It's really cool. It provides all of the requirements in the question, and more. This is an example of the beginning of parshat Shmot in the pocket-sized edition. Some features to notice: Shva na/ch -- ונפתלי, for example, shows both versions Kamatz katan -- on וימת Weekday aliyah breaks -- the diamonds before ויקם ...


2

Dr Fred Rosner in this article writes that Rav Moshe Feinstein paskened, A patient with an indwelling (urinary) catheter may recite his prayers if he covers the catheter and collection bag. (Teshuvos Orach Chayim Part 1 no 27). The text of the teshuvoh does not exclude them, so I assume that not only may he pray but he may say the priestly blessing ...


2

I believe this is the same reason we do not say the blessing on dwelling in the Sukkah on Shemini Atzereth, namely, to make a verbal declaration (or an action*) on Yom Tov that implies that it is chol would be considered a profanation of the sanctity of the day. *such as waving the four species; this reasoning is also used to justify the controversial ...


2

This is only a partial answer (in that I don't know the original sources) but such a custom is mentioned in Matteh Efraim 584:18 (by R. Efraim Zalman Margolios, 1762-1828 Brody, Ukraine) and the Aruch Hashulchan 584:3 (R. Yechiel Michel Epstein, 1829-1908 Belarus). I assume that the reasoning is the same why we would change the tune for tefillah: to reflect ...


2

I have had a similar situation occur. Once, many years ago when I got sick in the middle and another when the doctor who was leining (in a hospital) got an emergency call. In both cases, the leining (since it was after the minimum number of pesukim) was ended at the next pasuk, and the new person took over for the next aliyah. This was because the specified ...


2

You are asking two related but different questions. One about touching the Torah, one about reading it. Regarding touching a sefer Torah there is an explicit Rambam (Laws of Sefer Torah 10:8) which explicitly mentions niddot (i.e., women) Any impure person, even [a woman in] a niddah state or a gentile, may hold a Torah scroll and read it. SA YD 282:...



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