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11

wikipedia: A yad (Hebrew: יד‎) (Yiddish: האַנט), literally, "hand," is a Jewish ritual pointer, popularly known as a Torah pointer, used by the reader to follow the text during the Torah reading from the parchment Torah scrolls. Beyond its practical usage, the yad ensures that the parchment is not touched during the reading. There are several ...


9

I don't know about whether such a practice technique is permissible, but I'd recommend against it for other reasons. Unfortunately, due to Torah-readers' habit of singing "Amen" as an introduction to their reading, they sometimes end up delaying this response until too long after the blessing it's responding to. (The response is supposed to be "immediate" ...


8

To answer your question as briefly as I can, during a leap year where Rosh Hashannah begins on Tursday and the year is "Chaser" - "Deficient" meaning 383 days long, then Pesach begins on Sunday, and there will be 55 Shabatot in total. I am also assuming that we are talking about Galut readings, as Israel readings have slightly different rules. We have 54 ...


7

They would take out a separate Sefer Torah and read the curses, in addition to the standard weekly parshah. Source: I heard it directly from a well-known rav, who based it on the Rambam Hil. Tefillah, 13:1-2.


7

Because the Halacha is that you can sit (and such was the custom in the majority of synagogues in the period of the Rishonim), and everyone in a given place should follow the same custom. (Or Yitzchak 1:53)


6

Sefaria has an API that will serve it up as a JSON object.


5

O Ch 284 (4) starts with the words that someone under barmitzvah (age not specified) can say the maftir. The source is a gemoro in Megilo 23a.


5

The source for those who begin one verse earlier is the Eishel Abraham of Butatach (Siman 138) who explains that this is because the custom is to chant the verse "Eicha Esa Levadi" in the same tune as Megillas Eicha and it is therefore considered a "tochecha" (reproach) and we do not begin an Aliyah negatively. See also the Likutey Maharich (3:52:1) who ...


5

From all the Ashkenazi shuls I have been to the custom is that the congregation rises right before the conclusion of the sefer(1 of the 5) and upon completion the congregation says chazak ,chazak,vnitchazek,and then the Baal koreh says it then the oleh says the bracha.


5

The Mishna Berura (142:8) describes this practice and recommends it if no one in the shul knows how to lein. Note that later commentaries on the Mishna Berura (I don't have this in front of me at the moment, so I can't quote the source) clarify that the reader must still look at every word inside the Torah - otherwise it is not considered reading. ...


5

I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt (the eminent posek of Memphis and the greater South) that since the original enactment to read the Torah did not include the familiar rate of once a year, that in a case of need e.g. the baal korei has difficulty reading the whole parsha, then one could finish the Torah less frequently. He implied that one would not even need ...


5

I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt, the posek of the South that if the baal korei has trouble reading the whole thing you can further subdivide the parsha, as the original enactment of krias hatorah wasnt to finish it each year.


5

The Rama to Orach Chaim, 669:1 says to use one Sefer Torah for the first and third readings, and the other Sefer Torah for the second reading. במקום שאין להם רק שני ספרי תורה, קורין בראשונה "וזאת הברכה", ובשנייה "בראשית", וחוזרים ולוקחים הראשונה לעניינו של יום; וכן עושין כל מקום דבעינן שלושה ספרי תורה, ואין להם רק שתיים


4

There is a concern that the congregation might come to think that the Brachos said before Torah reading are written in the Torah, but closing the Torah and then opening it would take extra time (see Megillah 31a). Therefore, the Rama (139:6) writes that it is best to turn one's head away from the Torah while making the Beracha. Once one is turning his head, ...


4

You can find good scans of Baer and Delitszch's Masoretic Bible at: http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22Baer%2C+S.+%28Seligmann%29%2C+1825-1897%22 Wish they'd turn Bereishis (https://archive.org/details/libergenesis00baer) the right way up!


4

Say first passuk three times in the "Chumash side" Say it once in the "Torah side" 2a. If you have it, proceed to step 3 2b. If not, repeat steps 1 and 2 until you have it Learn the next passuk, using steps 1 and 2 Once you've learned five pessukim like that, read them all in the Torah side, once 4a. Fix any problems with those five pessukim At the end of ...


4

You're understating the facts when you say that "we are not supposed to learn Torah, in general from afternoon of Erev Tish'a B'av until after chatzot of Tish'a B'av": we're not allowed until nightfall. Source: Mishna B'rura 554:1. But someone who will read the Torah, even the afternoon reading, is allowed to review it. Source: MB 554:8.


4

Mechon Mamre's "תיקון קוראים" (also downloadable) has each word of the Pentateuch in a separate span element; pasuk-final words have different attributes in those elements. This is thus a machine-parseable Pentateuch with machine-parseable delineation of p'sukim, which seems to be what you seek.


4

From personal experience, here's what the Sofer thinks about, while writing: It's Lishma - and watch out for names of Hashem that need individual attention to become Lishma. Don't smudge, it's wet ink all around! Is there enough ink to finish the word? Don't drip when refilling the quill. Double check that you didn't overfill and risk a flood. Don't miss ...


4

There was a case with a group of shochtim who could not get a minyon for Shacharis on a Monday or Thursday. They were able to meet during their lunch break to have a minyon to lein. Update: Found this reference Can the Torah be read in shul if a minyan is present after the point in the service designated for Torah reading? One Monday there was a mess up ...


4

I believe that @YeZ is correct. When I lived in Washington Heights (upper Manhattan, NYC), I occasionally attended Cong. Sha'arei Hatikvah, which, I understand, still exists in the same location - across the street from the G.W. Bridge Bus terminal. They were "staunchly" Yekke. All 'ayins were pronounced as you describe, and the Chazan would say "Elokei ...


3

I use what i call the "brute force" method, because i don't "chunk" it at all. What i do is: Read the whole aliyah a few times on the chumash side of the tikkun. Start looking on the Torah side; check back to the chumash side often. (repeat a couple times) Try reading the whole thing only on the Torah side, but don't cover the chumash yet, in case i need a ...


3

They are still pretty punctilious about using this pronunciation at Congregation Shearith Israel, the Spanish and Portuguese synagogue on the Upper West Side.


3

A couple of other tweaks (though not the one you're discussing): Divvy up the parsha among many readers -- seven is the floor, not the ceiling. This is huge, instead of exhausting one poor baal kriah week after week. Have someone prompt the baal kriah with what to say -- or even have him pause and someone whispers each verse to him. (Some places have ...


3

שערי אפרים‎ 4:4 says to do so when saying "ונתן לנו את תורתו" and "אשר נתן לנו תורת אמת" in the blessings. I'm guessing people got confused.


2

The Zilberman Cheder in the Old City of Yerushalayim printed a seperate volume for each Neviim and Kesuvim without any trop or nekudos.


2

The Kli Yakar says that it is to emphasize that the verse stands alone - it is telling us that Hashem spoke to Moshe by day, and not at night, unlike all the other prophets.


2

One way to solve this would be to make sure somebody diligent [and somewhat aggressive] is given a Tikkun/Chumash which highlights these things, and have him correct you when needed. The Simanim Tikun comes to mind. If you want as few corrections as possible, highlight those few instances that are critical in the Chumash/Tikun you give him.


2

One thing you can do is ask the gabay rishon (chief gabay) if the person standing on the other side of the bima (table) can be a person of your choosing instead of or in addition to the usual gabay sheni (vice-gabay; or instead of no one) and pick someone who you know knows grammar and will correct you. I've done this one the rare occasion that I was reading ...



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