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In the sefer Ishei Yisrael pg 423, the author cites the Ketzos Hashulchan siman 25:14 that if one prayed alone then one should read the parsha from a chumash. He then cites in the next halacha (from Mishna Brurah 143:9, and Orach Neman seif 7) that in a place (yishuv) where there is no kosher sefer Torah then one person from the minyan should read from a ...


4

First, if you don't yet understand how the main trope "sentences" work, it'll help if you learn those. If you're memorizing tropes one at a time (mercha... tifchah... etnachta... tevir...), you're doing a lot more work than if you recognize the first three as an etnachta clause sans munach. This is the difference between learning to read text a letter at a ...


4

The Rivevos Ephraim chelek 5:584:3 writes that, since if one misses one word of krias megila they are not yotzei (Mishna Brurah 690:5), accordingly it seems that certainly by parshas zachor which is a Torah obligation if one misses one word he is not yotzei: like the Sefer Mikraei Kodesh siman 7 writes, it isn't any lower than megillah. Therefore one should ...


4

The HaEmek Dovor explains unexpected dageshim as an intensification of the meaning. Thus, in Gen 43:26 he says that: the dagesh in the Aleph indicates the strength of the bringing, to show that each one tried to present the gift with their own hand rather than have one or two of the brothers bring it on behalf of all of them. This was in order to show ...


3

It's very common in some of the manuscripts - for example, the codex of the Prophets from the Qaraite synagogue in Cairo, which was written by Moshe ben Asher. There, it features in every the occasional consonantal aleph (and might therefore be understood to be a mappiq). This is generally considered to have been a feature of the Palestinian vocalisation ...


3

There actually is a schedule, though nowadays it is not very well known. A full listing of the where each section in Nakh (the Prophets and Writings) begins can be found here. These sections, known as סדרים sedarim, are marked in old manuscripts of Tanakh with the letter ס. There are 295 such sections in the link above, leading many to beleive that this ...


3

As noted in the question, the torah is divided up into portions and read in its entirety over time (either one year or three years, depending on local practice). This is not true for the rest of the Tanakh; while parts are read on a regular basis, other parts are never read in synagogue (though they of course are studied in other contexts). Each weekly ...


3

The Minchas Elazar (Shu"t Minchas Elazar 1:66) discusses this case, and suggests as follows: For Parshas Bechukosai, where the curses are closer to the beginning of the Parsha, the Baal Koreh can get Cohen, and read until after the curses. For Parshas Ki Savo, where the curses are closer to the end of the Parsha, they should make the earlier Aliyos ...


3

@MonicaCellio's answer is great; I would just like to add my personal experience. Now that I've been laining for a while, my process has changed, but back when I was learning everything for the first time, I would break the laining into chunks. I used half-column chunks, but you can do whatever size works for you. There is no better substitute than simple ...


2

According to what it says in SA at the end Siman 685 that by Rosh Chodesh that falls out on Chanukah and you started to read the part for Chanukah (instead of Rosh Chodesh) you must interrupt and go to Rosh Chodesh (see Mishnah Berurah & Bi'ur Halacha), all the more so on a regular Monday. As far as 4 or 5 Aliyot, it has to be a total of 4 because it is ...


2

It should first be noted that the k'thiv/q'rei phenomenon you refer to is only observed in the Pentateuch and not elsewhere in Tanach. That being said, there appear to be two major camps on this issue. One camp believes along the lines of what you suggested, namely that הוא was actually written to mean היא. The explanation is that waw and yod were used ...


1

One way to solve this would be to make sure somebody diligent [and somewhat aggressive] is given a Tikkun/Chumash which highlights these things, and have him correct you when needed. The Simanim Tikun comes to mind. If you want as few corrections as possible, highlight those few instances that are critical in the Chumash/Tikun you give him.


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One thing you can do is ask the gabay rishon (chief gabay) if the person standing on the other side of the bima (table) can be a person of your choosing instead of or in addition to the usual gabay sheni (vice-gabay; or instead of no one) and pick someone who you know knows grammar and will correct you. I've done this one the rare occasion that I was reading ...


1

The laws are brought in O Ch 146 (2) MB [8] and [14]. MB[8] allows one to learn quietly and to do “shnayim mikro v'echod targum” during the communal Torah reading as long as there are ten people who are paying attention to the reading. So under those circumstances it is “just a good thing to do” to listen and certainly not a sin to “study the ...


1

According to Machzor Vitri the Shliach Tzibbur says ......אל ארך אפים ורב חסד ואמת and the congregation responds with ......אל ארך אפים מלא רחמים. This is done immediately prior to opening the Ark for the reading of the Torah. This would indicate that the placement did not change. However the question remains why do we say only one or the other.


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This Yerushalmi (Megillah perek 4, halacha 1) that Double AA cited tells a fascinating story. In it, Rav Shmuel bar Rav Yitzchak visits a shul and witnesses keriat haTorah in which the reader is “leaning on a post.” He claims that “This posture is forbidden, just as it was delivered at Sinai in a manner which instigated fear and trembling, so must it be ...


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See the following related discussion: Question: I have questions about the Kri’at Hatorah (Torah reading = laining) of Mincha of Shabbat regarding cases (common in the army) where we will not have access to a sefer Torah at the time we can daven Mincha. Can we read it in the morning after Mussaf? If we davened without Kri’at Hatorah and then we got access to ...


1

Wow, I was fascinated by the question, so I looked it up... First, an introduction of a central concept: There is a disagreement that wends through the Talmud (like Sanhedrin 4a,b) regarding the words of a Torah scroll whether "Yesh Aim leMikrah" or "Yesh Aim leMesoret". Roughly translated, that means "Primacy is given to how it is read" or "Primacy is ...


1

Contrary to what the previous answer states, there can be a phonemic difference in many of these instances. If one pronounces an unaspirated /bet/ as a /waw/, for example, it might be mistaken for a conjunctive; if one usually differentiates between a /tav/ and a /sav/, the use of the former in a situation where the previous word sounds as though it ...



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