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9

wikipedia: A yad (Hebrew: יד‎) (Yiddish: האַנט), literally, "hand," is a Jewish ritual pointer, popularly known as a Torah pointer, used by the reader to follow the text during the Torah reading from the parchment Torah scrolls. Beyond its practical usage, the yad ensures that the parchment is not touched during the reading. There are several ...


9

I don't know about whether such a practice technique is permissible, but I'd recommend against it for other reasons. Unfortunately, due to Torah-readers' habit of singing "Amen" as an introduction to their reading, they sometimes end up delaying this response until too long after the blessing it's responding to. (The response is supposed to be "immediate" ...


8

To answer your question as briefly as I can, during a leap year where Rosh Hashannah begins on Tursday and the year is "Chaser" - "Deficient" meaning 383 days long, then Pesach begins on Sunday, and there will be 55 Shabatot in total. I am also assuming that we are talking about Galut readings, as Israel readings have slightly different rules. We have 54 ...


7

They would take out a separate Sefer Torah and read the curses, in addition to the standard weekly parshah. Source: I heard it directly from a well-known rav, who based it on the Rambam Hil. Tefillah, 13:1-2.


7

The Mishna Berura (142:8) describes this practice and recommends it if no one in the shul knows how to lein. Note that later commentaries on the Mishna Berura (I don't have this in front of me at the moment, so I can't quote the source) clarify that the reader must still look at every word inside the Torah - otherwise it is not considered reading. ...


5

Sefaria has an API that will serve it up as a JSON object.


5

From all the Ashkenazi shuls I have been to the custom is that the congregation rises right before the conclusion of the sefer(1 of the 5) and upon completion the congregation says chazak ,chazak,vnitchazek,and then the Baal koreh says it then the oleh says the bracha.


5

The source for those who begin one verse earlier is the Eishel Abraham of Butatach (Siman 138) who explains that this is because the custom is to chant the verse "Eicha Esa Levadi" in the same tune as Megillas Eicha and it is therefore considered a "tochecha" (reproach) and we do not begin an Aliyah negatively. See also the Likutey Maharich (3:52:1) who ...


4

There is a concern that the congregation might come to think that the Brachos said before Torah reading are written in the Torah, but closing the Torah and then opening it would take extra time (see Megillah 31a). Therefore, the Rama (139:6) writes that it is best to turn one's head away from the Torah while making the Beracha. Once one is turning his head, ...


4

O Ch 284 (4) starts with the words that someone under barmitzvah (age not specified) can say the maftir. The source is a gemoro in Megilo 23a.


4

Mechon Mamre's "תיקון קוראים" (also downloadable) has each word of the Pentateuch in a separate span element; pasuk-final words have different attributes in those elements. This is thus a machine-parseable Pentateuch with machine-parseable delineation of p'sukim, which seems to be what you seek.


4

From personal experience, here's what the Sofer thinks about, while writing: It's Lishma - and watch out for names of Hashem that need individual attention to become Lishma. Don't smudge, it's wet ink all around! Is there enough ink to finish the word? Don't drip when refilling the quill. Double check that you didn't overfill and risk a flood. Don't miss ...


4

It's very common in some of the manuscripts - for example, the codex of the Prophets from the Qaraite synagogue in Cairo, which was written by Moshe ben Asher. There, it features in every the occasional consonantal aleph (and might therefore be understood to be a mappiq). This is generally considered to have been a feature of the Palestinian vocalisation ...


4

The HaEmek Dovor explains unexpected dageshim as an intensification of the meaning. Thus, in Gen 43:26 he says that: the dagesh in the Aleph indicates the strength of the bringing, to show that each one tried to present the gift with their own hand rather than have one or two of the brothers bring it on behalf of all of them. This was in order to show ...


4

You can find good scans of Baer and Delitszch's Masoretic Bible at: http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22Baer%2C+S.+%28Seligmann%29%2C+1825-1897%22 Wish they'd turn Bereishis (https://archive.org/details/libergenesis00baer) the right way up!


4

The Rivevos Ephraim chelek 5:584:3 writes that, since if one misses one word of krias megila they are not yotzei (Mishna Brurah 690:5), accordingly it seems that certainly by parshas zachor which is a Torah obligation if one misses one word he is not yotzei: like the Sefer Mikraei Kodesh siman 7 writes, it isn't any lower than megillah. Therefore one should ...


4

First, if you don't yet understand how the main trope "sentences" work, it'll help if you learn those. If you're memorizing tropes one at a time (mercha... tifchah... etnachta... tevir...), you're doing a lot more work than if you recognize the first three as an etnachta clause sans munach. This is the difference between learning to read text a letter at a ...


4

You're understating the facts when you say that "we are not supposed to learn Torah, in general from afternoon of Erev Tish'a B'av until after chatzot of Tish'a B'av": we're not allowed until nightfall. Source: Mishna B'rura 554:1. But someone who will read the Torah, even the afternoon reading, is allowed to review it. Source: MB 554:8.


3

@MonicaCellio's answer is great; I would just like to add my personal experience. Now that I've been laining for a while, my process has changed, but back when I was learning everything for the first time, I would break the laining into chunks. I used half-column chunks, but you can do whatever size works for you. There is no better substitute than simple ...


2

I know of no specific halacha or custom that would prevent a Bar Mitzvah boy from reading the Tochacha. I've seen several B'nai Mitzvha read the entire pasrha Ki Tavo on their Bar Mitzvah Shabbat, and no one thought this being any different from any other Bar Mitzvah Shabbat. As a Ba'al Kri'ah, I think that if reading the Tochacha is a challenge for the Bar ...


2

One way to solve this would be to make sure somebody diligent [and somewhat aggressive] is given a Tikkun/Chumash which highlights these things, and have him correct you when needed. The Simanim Tikun comes to mind. If you want as few corrections as possible, highlight those few instances that are critical in the Chumash/Tikun you give him.


2

One thing you can do is ask the gabay rishon (chief gabay) if the person standing on the other side of the bima (table) can be a person of your choosing instead of or in addition to the usual gabay sheni (vice-gabay; or instead of no one) and pick someone who you know knows grammar and will correct you. I've done this one the rare occasion that I was reading ...


2

Rabbi Dovid Stein of Beit Kenesset Chatam in Rehovot has a large group of deaf people come and read Parshas Zachor from the torah every year. Meaning that each individual comes to the torah and reads for himself. Presumably this is because "krias hatorah" needs to be just that - reading from the torah, and sign language is not considered to fit into the ...


2

I'm not sure how to answer this question for anyone but myself. The barest minimum requirement for writing a sefer torah is that it be legible. The ink must be black, and the traditional fonts pretty much require all the letters to be very bold. In that sense the sofer does not have to worry about usability because halacha and minhag do the worrying for ...


2

אמן יתומה typically means waiting too long to respond to Amen after berachah has been given. I think your case is similar to אמן יתומה since it is an Amen which is not connected to any berachah. The focus of your Amen during a real aliyah is that you are sharing the beracha with the oleh. Originally, each oleh read his own aliyah, and so he said a beracha ...


2

Megillas Ester is actually the only exception to the normal rule that you must hear only the voice of the reader (OK, Hallel also, but no one fulfills Hallel by listening nowadays). Megillah 21b: תנו רבנן בתורה אחד קורא ואחד מתרגם ובלבד שלא יהא אחד קורא ושנים מתרגמין ובנביא אחד קורא ושנים מתרגמין ובלבד שלא יהו שנים קורין ושנים מתרגמין ובהלל ובמגילה ...


2

Had it been that the one reading out of a chumash reads first, and afterwards the other reads out of the Torah, it should be fine. See Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim siman 141 siff 3. For clarification, see the Biur Halacha who ends up explaining that the Makrei is the one reading out of a chumash, and the Olah is the one reading the Torah. He starts off by ...


1

A suggestion which I admit is not totally supported by the quoted source. www.torah.org has an article on tefillin from which I abstracted some lines which might be put together to justify the policy of your shul. In short I am thinking that the shul might think that to read from the Torah one needs a clean body (guf noki) and that someone not wearing ...


1

The Rivevos Ephraim 2:98 holds its a hefsek and he should not be the Baal koreh for this aliah. Halachicly speaking has alot of sources on this,including this one.


1

Although it is unlikely given the power of most commonly available lasers, it is possible to damage the klaf using a laser if you had a high powered laser. Some may not like the idea of using a laser since it is moving away from the ancient tradition of using a yad, which is considered to hiddur to the Torah in the same way that all the Torah adornments are ...



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