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2

As sam said in the comments "If it takes away someone's mind from aveilus then it should not be done,just like working on Tisha bav even after chatzos see Shulchan Aruch 554:22 with the Mishna Brurah there" So since it most probably would take your mind off aveilus the answer is you are not allowed to.


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What makes this particular murder stand out is the ingratitude associated with it. Zechariah's father, Yehoyada, kin Yehoash's mentor, saved his life from Athaliah, and took great measures to set him on the throne. The murder of Zechariah was authorized by Yehoash himself, who was indebted for his own life to Yehoyada and his descendants. The biblical ...


1

There is no atoning for killing a priest-prophet. The Talmud in Sanhedrin 7b says that the reason Ahron abided the golden calf is because he reasoned that were he to resist, he would be slaughtered as Hur had been, leaving the people no recourse, citing the verse from Lamentations. At least with the sin of the golden calf there was a possibility of ...


1

The reference is to a kohen and a navi who was killed in the bais hamikdash on Yom Kippur that fell on shabbos, (Yerush. Taanit 4:5). The comments as to the nevua that he was killed for also show the seriousness of it. However, the main aspect is the human blood on the floor of the Bais Hamikdash shows the point of the story. No other navi was killed in a ...


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This is based on my own surmisal: Pirkei Avot 5 mishna 8: Ten miracles were performed for our fathers in the Temple ... No man said to his fellow, "There is no room for me to lodge in Jerusalem." Note that it states "lodging", and some commentaries explain that during the Bet Hamikdash, when people came for Regel (3 times / yr. "pilgrimage") ...


4

This statement is inaccurate: On Tisha b'Av and Yom Kippur, we are not supposed to lave our hands. As we learn in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן קכד - הלכות תשעה באב laving hands and getting wet in general is not a problem, if not done for pleasure: וְאֵינָהּ אֲסוּרָה רַק רְחִיצָה שֶׁל תַּעֲנוּג. אֲבָל שֶׁלֹּא לְתַעֲנוּג, מֻתָּר. וְלָכֵן רוֹחֵץ ...


1

My own take: The hats in question are מגבעות worn by the kohanim during the Temple Service. The Service represents stability (to the point that rabbinic idiom still includes the phrase תמידים כסדרן to this day). The stability of the Kohanim at their posts is contrasted with the instability of the alarms and terror of the exile.


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The Shaar Hakollel (R' Avrohom Dovid Lavut) writes that he heard from R' Hillel Paritcher that one is allowed to learn Kabbalah on Tisha BeAv, as one is allowed to give over the secrets of the Torah only to one who's heart is worried.


2

You are supposed to understand the words you use in prayer. In fact, if you don't understand the hebrew words, you really should be praying in the language that you do understand. So if it is the translation of parts of the Tisha Be'av prayers, which also of course include regular daily prayers, it should be permitted. The source for this that if you ...


1

The Netey Gabriel in Hilchot Ben Hametzarim vo. 2 75:11 explains that reading\learning Mussar is permitted on the ninth of Av since it breaks and arouses a persons heart. It would seem however that philosophical works like the Kuzari and the guide for the perplexed is forbidden since reasons given for permiting learning certain parts of the Torah don't seem ...


2

You are not beholden of course, but I asked this to my Rosh Yeshiva and he said mussar is definitely in the spirit of the day, but most mussar sfarim constantly quote psukim which we may not read, so the answer was no. I didn't ask him about philosophical works.


3

Many communities offer various shiurim and / or films during the afternoon. I don't know if this is available where you live, but in mine, shuls "compete" with each other. During approx. the last decade, The Chofetz Chaim Heritage Foundation has presented 2 excelent videos on Tish'a B'av. Many shuls present one or both of them, and they are always ...


4

You're understating the facts when you say that "we are not supposed to learn Torah, in general from afternoon of Erev Tish'a B'av until after chatzot of Tish'a B'av": we're not allowed until nightfall. Source: Mishna B'rura 554:1. But someone who will read the Torah, even the afternoon reading, is allowed to review it. Source: MB 554:8.


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You are not the only one who was perplexed by this halacha as the MB brings several opinions (GR"A, RaSHaL) that did not accept the Rama's ruling and the Biur Halacha (BH) seems to concur with them. The MB gives a reason that Torah study gladdens the heart, While the Magen Avraham says that since it is possible to learn those topics that are permitted on ...


2

Rav Moshe Einstadter of Cleveland, Ohio told me that for several years he actually switched to saying pesukim from Eicha, and Mishnayos and Gemara related to mourning. He switched back after some time. Rav Ezra Neuberger (Rosh Kollel of Kollel Avoads Levi of Ner Israel) explained that these segments are not arbitrary, or just happen to be conveniently ...


4

No, even reviewing is not allowed. Words of Torah are intrinsically "mesamchei lev", make the heart happy and are therefore not permited to be studied on Tisha B'Av. Besides, review can almost inevitably bring to new insights not though of before (ain bais hamedrash b'lo chidush). An easy and meaningful fast to all.


2

O Ch 553 (2) Rema near the end says After Chatzos on Erev Tisha B'Av, the Minhag is to learn only things that may be learned on Tisha B'Av. The source for what can be learnt on 9th Av is mentioned in this question. It is O Ch 554 (1-4). There seems to be no special leniences for 8th Av afternoon. My Rav said (and I saw it here) that Certainly ...


6

There are a variety of things that people do on Tisha B'Av. Many people spend most of the morning reading and discussing the Kinnos. It is also permitted and widespread to learn certain bits of Torah that are relevant to Tisha B'Av. These include Eicha, Iyov, the story of the destruction of the Temple which is related in Gittin 56b-58a and Sanhedrin 104, the ...


2

Ohr Someach gives the halocho as: Greeting someone with "good morning" and the like is prohibited. One who is greeted should answer softly and, if possible, inform the person of the prohibition. "Gut Mo'ed" seems as much a greeting as "Good morning and the like" which are prohibited and may undesirably elicit a more light-hearted response since it ...


5

If you see the Mishna Brurah in Siman 552 he writes that's from the din of gemara,but regarding minhag its assur from Rosh Chodesh


2

There are several. Some of them are brought here by the Lubavitcher Rebbe. Kabbalistically Kiddush Levana is said after Tisha B'Av because the afternoon is the time of the birth of Moshiach. Similarly, Rabbi Chaim Vital (the main student of the Arizal) says we can say Pesukei Nechama - verses of comfort, which are normally skipped on Tisha B'Av, at Mincha ...


1

My rav explained that Tachanun (which, is part of your question, per se, not necessarily the direct reason why Avinu Malkeinu) is omitted on occasions of either "extreme" - extreme joy or extreme sadness. Yom Tov is "extreme joy" so Tachanun is omitted. In a house of mourning during the week of shiva, Tachanun is also omitted. This is a location & time ...


1

An article by the Campus Rabbi of Bar Ilan University states: In his commentary to the Mishnah (Rosh Hashanah 1,3), Maimonides states that the Jews in the Second Temple period fasted on Tishah B'av. This was not a copier’s error. Indeed, In the fifth chapter of Hilchot Ta'aniot, halachah 5, after Maimonides listed the four fast days ...


6

Today's HalachaText said that clothing should be worn for at least 30 minutes. I asked them for a source and they said this number came from Rav Elyashiv Ztl. שוב מצאתי I was looking for something else in Rabbi Simcha Bunim Cohen's Laws of the Three Weeks, and found that he quotes Rav YS Elyashiv there as saying a half an hour (page 85); in a footnote he ...


4

I got this in an email from a "dailyhalacha" service: During the Nine days (beginning Rosh Chodesh Av) the custom is that one does not wear freshly laundered clothing. Therefore, one should wear all the clothing one will need during the Nine days for a short while (according to many Poskim - 20 minutes), sometime before the start of the Nine ...



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