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8

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


6

http://hershkow.comeze.com/46.pdf Regarding a old Esrog - Shaalos UTeshuvos Maharil 5 says that it is impossible to maintain its wetness from year to year and therefore it may not be used. Rama Orach Chaim 648 based on this Maharil says it is definitely dry and unusable. However the Bikurei Yaakov (Aruch Laner) says that he saw an Esrog that ...


6

To posit some sort of "prophetic perfect tense" or the like is entirely superfluous. I am confident that one is unable to grammatically distinguish between regular and "prophetic" usage. However we do find examples where a prophet will speak from a point of view in which a future event is seen as having transpired, see Numbers 24:17 for example. This is ...


6

Hello Baal Rishon, and welcome to J.SE. It sounds like there's a very thorny situation underfoot, and this is going to require a real-life expert rabbi. I strongly recommend you contact the experts at the Beth Din of America. May G-d help everyone involved in this difficult matter, and may it be concluded in such a way that the pain to everyone involved ...


6

There are a variety of things that people do on Tisha B'Av. Many people spend most of the morning reading and discussing the Kinnos. It is also permitted and widespread to learn certain bits of Torah that are relevant to Tisha B'Av. These include Eicha, Iyov, the story of the destruction of the Temple which is related in Gittin 56b-58a and Sanhedrin 104, the ...


5

As far as I know, "Shachar" - is a name of a star. When it get placed somewhere in the sky - halachikaly the day begins. I've just found out here that Venus is named Shachar.


5

In Tanach the word Barzel - ברזל appears 44 times. Per Wikipedia The Iron Age in the Ancient Near East is believed to have begun with the discovery of iron smelting and smithing techniques in Anatolia or the Caucasus and Balkans in the late 2nd millennium BC (c. 1300 BC) The Torah was given in the year 1313 BCE. Notwithstanding the above, even ...


5

Within traditional Jewish sources, the overwhelmingly dominant opinion is that God has absolute knowledge of everything, including the future. As the Talmud (Avos 3:15, as understood by Maimonides) states, "הכל צפוי" - "All is foreseen." There are, of course, many questions and difficulties that can be raised on this topic, which is, admittedly, one that is ...


5

In a footnote in this document it states, Iggerot Moshe, Orach Chaim 4:60. Rabbi Feinstein writes that use of timers to automatically regulate machines to perform work forbidden to Jews on Shabbat is generally forbidden, with the exception of turning lights on and off. He believes that use of timers would severely disrupt the Shabbat atmosphere, ...


5

My great grandfather (in S. Germany) used to save his Lulav from year to year in his coat closet. He would remove the outer leaves and the insides were apparently still fresh enough to be used. For that matter, a lot of the Lulavim and Haddasim that are in the market now, have been in storage for many months. The Shulchan Aruch (based in the Mishna) spells ...


5

One keeps the sabbath — abstains from certain activities and tries to engage in holy pursuits — from sundown Friday to nighttime Saturday, irrespective of his ability to perform the sabbath ceremonies. Such abstentions and pursuits may be subject to your commanding officers' restrictions on you; consult a rabbi for specific questions as they ...


5

"Shifting one's personal clock" and the like -- the example you gave was someone who finds himself in the wilderness and has no sense of what day it is -- the Talmud says he should start some sort of calendar and work with it. That's not applicable to the situation at hand, in which everyone agrees that it's now Friday January 31st 2014 and that sunset is at ...


4

Rav Wosner in Shevet Halevi 1:176 brings from the Bach that it would be mutar as long as it didn't change from its regular look,but one has to know that water from the freezer can pasul it because water makes it rot.see inside for the discussion of kavush. Rav Moshe Feinstein in Igros Moshe OC 1:185 discusses whether an esrog that was frozen can be used ...


4

Granting that time travel would ever be conceivable, I would make the following comments: Initially a reason should be provided to suggest that something is assur. Coincidentally however, I have thought of a comparable precedent which demonstrates how it is permissible to travel through time. Whenever we move, we inevitably alter time imperceptibly ...


4

See the באר היטב in Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 186, s.q. 8: עד שיתעכל. ושיעור עיכול בשאכילה מועטת הוא כדי הילוך ד' מילין והוא שעה וחומש וכת' המ"א נ"ל דהאי עיכול תחלת עיכול הוא דסוף עיכול הוי' עכ"פ ו' שעות Until [the food] is digested. The measure for digestion for small eating is the time it takes to walk 4 mil, and that is one and one fifth hours. ...


4

From the Star-K: If one ate pareve food that was cooked in a fleishig pot, one is not required to wait six hours before eating dairy. However, one may not eat this food together with dairy or reheat it in a dairy pot. For example, if one cooked spaghetti in a fleishig pot he may eat cheese immediately after finishing the spaghetti. However, he may not ...


4

M'tzudas David, commenting the first time the phrase appears in Nach, writes: It means to imply "forever", as anyone reading this verse, in his own time, will say "until this day". This is a general rule in the words of the prophets. (Presumably, as Fred mentioned in a comment on the question, this refers only to "where the expression is used by an ...


4

First of all, as most readers are probably aware, customs vary regarding exactly how long to wait between meat and dairy, and there are indeed customs that differentiate between actual meat and poultry in this regard. However, I believe that the more accepted custom is to wait the same amount of time after meat or poultry. Like in all matters of halakha, ...


4

HALACHIPEDIA has part of its entry on Birkat HaMazon that deals with the question. The numbers refer to the references – please see the original especially ref 21. It's not the distraction that matters so much as the time and how hungry you are - see below. How long does one have to say Birkat HaMazon? If one ate bread and is full, preferably ...


3

The Zohar recommends examining one's deeds and repenting every night before going to sleep (Korach 178a): הא אוקמו דבכל לילא ולילא, עד לא ישכב ועד לא נאים בעי בר נש למיעבד חושבנא מעובדוי דעבד כל ההוא יומא ויתב מנייהי ויבעי עלייהו רחמי This is cited approvingly by poskim such as the Mateh Moshe (Amud Ha'avoda §829): יעשה כדעת הזוהר וישב קודם שישכב ...


3

Regarding your main question: My question is: If the Geonic tradition is clear on this point, why did some Rishonim require one to wait no matter what? When there was a shift from one era to another, they were accompanied by major shifts in the world as well. One of the main differences between Geonim and Rishonim is the shift towards logical ...


3

Rabbi Eliyahu Dessler, Michtav M'Eliyahu, Vol. II, p. 21 says (here wrt Yom Kippur) “We have already explained that we do not have a token celebration of the Festivals, rather we actually return to each festival’s origin in time; the very same holiness of time that influences us today is the same as when the Festivals were first commemorated. Rav ...


3

I beleive that Rabbi Moshe chaim Luzzatu(הרמח"ל) had a spiral concept of time. "והנה, כיונה (החכמה העליונה) שסוף הסיבוב יהיה תמיד בקודש, ונמצא זה עילוי גדול לכל הימים, שאף על פי שרובם חול ורק חלק אחד משבע הוא הקודש, והוא מה שמצטרך לעולם הזה כמו זכרנו, אמנם מצד אחר, בהיות החלק הזה סוף הסיבוב וחיתומו, נמצא הסיבוב כולו נתקן ומתעלה" (derech hashem) I ...


3

Seder Olam Rabba (written by Rabbi Yose Ben Chalafta in the 2nd century) chapter 3 says that they took 12 months - based on the starting point of your discussion, namely the gathering of the straw, which he writes is normal to do in Iyar (not in the fall). The Mishna in Eduyos 2:10 says the same: משפט המצריים, שנים עשר חודש The judgement of the ...


3

Aruch HaShulchan Orach Chaim 184:7 & 8 says that we don't know how to determine if one is still full, therefore one should say Birchas HaMazon within 72 minutes of completing the meal. If it is beyond 72 minutes then one should eat another Kezayis and then say Birchas HaMazon.


3

Many communities offer various shiurim and / or films during the afternoon. I don't know if this is available where you live, but in mine, shuls "compete" with each other. During approx. the last decade, The Chofetz Chaim Heritage Foundation has presented 2 excelent videos on Tish'a B'av. Many shuls present one or both of them, and they are always ...


3

There is no "trick" to not accept Shabbat through Maariv that I am aware of or have seen practiced. So, yes, it is (basically) just like a winter Shabbat on the front end. Some notes: Many shuls will plan their early Shabbat Minyan to start Mincha prior to Plag HaMincha (1.25 proportional hours before sunset) and Maariv after Plag HaMincha. This presents a ...


2

The Da'as Zkeinim (and the Chizkuni) at the beginning of Parshas Noach addresses this issue in a different context - The posuk says תמים by Noach, and the Midrash says (Bereishis Rabba 30:8) that anyone described as such lived to an age the which is the multiple of 7 (full שבוע). Noach's 950 do not add (or divide) up. He answers that he lived this amount ...


2

In short, no you have not been mechallel shabbos. However there's an issur d'rabonon in both cases. In the case of putting something into the oven, the food has to reach "ochel Ben deurso". Which is about 1/3 cooked in order to violate shabbos. In the case of the seed it's trickier aside from the rabbinic prohibition of handling the seed (because it's ...


2

this is a famous dispute between the Minchas Chinuch and the Rashash in Shabbos (73a)- the Minchas Chinuch says that if one removed the seed before the zriah he is still liable, however the rashash says one is not liable, the rashash compares to the din of baking, that if one stopped the baking before it was finsihed one is not liable for bishul, since the ...



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