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34

The civil date line doesn't affect the Halachic day with regards to Shabbos. Where is the location date line is subject to Halachic argument According to the Chazon Ish, the Halachic dateline hugs the coast of Australia, China and Russia. Anything to the east (Japan, etc) is considered to be on the same day as the United States. Therefore, it's Shabbos in ...


21

The question of where the Halachic International Dateline is is its own independent question. The decision in Samoa would only matter if we left date-line issues to governmental/secular authorities, which is not the case. The day to keep Shabbos in Samoa would be seven days from the last time it was to be kept, according to which ever opinion we should/do go ...


17

It seems The Star K picked up on the question: How to Keep This Shabbos in Samoa? STAR-K Tells Us How (Samoa & Tokelau To Cross International Date Line)


15

R. Michael Broyde responded to a similar question about flying to Australia erev Shabbos, in which case one would start before Shabbos and then all of the sudden be at the end of Shabbos. R. Broyde distinguished between two cases: when it becomes Shabbos on the plane and then skips ahead to the end of Shabbos (in which case, this should not be done ...


11

You end your fast when it becomes dark, independent of how long you have been already fasting. Source: Igrot Moshe OC 3:96 See also Shevet HaLevi 8:261:2 who argues and says to stop based on you original location's times. It's not clear if he would hold this lechumra as well.


11

The Shut Hor Yizchak (Hor Hachaim 157) says that not only it is OK, but the question not even starts ("he did nothing"). The example he gives is to call from Israel to the States on Motzei Shabat. In Israel it is after Shabat and in the States the Shabat is still on. He adds that it is even permissible to phone a non Jew and ask him to do work for you. I ...


8

Flying on a plane before shabbos is not like embarking on a boat regardless of the reasoning (I remember 4 offhand): The sea-sickness will breach your kavod shabbos: Anyone who has been on a medium size boat in the ocean without dramamine knows that this is no comparison to flying on a plane which is pretty smooth. The crew is doing melacha for you: Does ...


7

See this excellent article by the Star-K's Rabbi Heber. In summary, if you're close to the North (or South) Pole and it's dark for days, the opinions are: Minchas Elazar: halachically, night can last for several weeks or months. So don't put on tefilin if it's dark. Tiferes Yisroel: bring along an almanac from your hometown, and follow that. Absent ...


6

I'm not sure I understand your question, but basically many rabbis feel that the Torah states where the dateline should be, so we don't really care what the local population thinks. (Though a frustrated Rabbi Yitzchak Zev Brisker, when asked about the dateline, exclaimed -- " I don't know. And I don't know why everyone else thinks they know!") There are ...


5

Rav Hershel Schacter discusses a Kasav yad of the Rambam which could assur such ideas. http://www.ou.org/torah/article/let_my_people_know inyun starts at 8:50 where he discusses this peirush HaRambam and Rav Moshe on setting up something that causes a melacha on Shabbas and he comes out that l'chumra it should not be done and the OU tries to avoid sending ...


4

The English book The Date Line in Halacha (a super-abridged translation of the massive ספר תאריך ישראל) states When flying westward on the fast day, and 10 Teves becomes 11 Teves, the aforementioned machlokes would apply. Rav Schienberg and Yisroel Vehazemanim would permit one to break the fast midday, while Rav Elyashiv and Rav Chaim ...


3

I'd seen the question asked years ago about someone in Israel, after shabbos had ended, doing online transactions (including making an ATM withdrawal) that will affect a US computer while it's still shabbos there. The response was that if everything's automated, it's permissible. (This is related to a debate between the academies of Hillel and Shammai in ...


2

I recollect that friend of mine told me that his father-in-law was stationed in Greenland and was told by R' Moshe (or by someone who asked for him?) that he should go by the closest city with normal times. I haven't done a whole lot of research on this subject, but off the cuff, perhaps all of these times aren't "real times", but a personal gauge. ...


2

If you send a fax on Friday (before sunset in your timezone) to Israel, or anywhere else in the world, such that it is after the Sabbath has commenced in that time zone, then you are causing the same amount of work to be done as setting electronic timers to turn off and on the lights during the Sabbath. So like @rony says, if you find that degree of activity ...


2

I'd say it depends what you are looking at and the degree to which your observation affects the event on site. Let's start with the assumption that what you are watching is something you could watch on weekdays. My understanding of the permissibility of going where there are security cameras on Shabbat (based on several YU lectures) involves me wanting ...


1

I know the Journal of Halacha & Contemporary Society had an article about this many years ago. If I recall correctly (and that's a big "if", and that may not be the only opinion), if it was a Torah-prohibited fast you'd have to wait until you saw actual sunset; for the minor fasts you could stop at what your sunset should be. I don't remember which way ...


1

Rabbi Frand once dealt with this problem by speaking of the case of an answering machine or a FAX. While leaving a message on an answering machine in Eretz Yisroel would not be a problem as long as the recipient did not actually use it, you could cause a problem if the person at the other end would actually be mechalel shabbos as a result of your leaving the ...



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