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7

I don't think one can visualize the churban bais hamikdash without a change in life and perspective. However, I did hear of a summer camp, which had the kids build forts and other buildings, and then on Tisha B'av the counselors burned it all down, and deestroyed it. This apparently helped the kids gain an appreciation of the feelings of loss with the ...


6

Rav Moshe Feinstein (Igrot Moshe OC 1:168) holds that in general one can have a wedding on the night of 17 Tammuz when necessary, but says in that same teshuva that for sure when the fast is Nidche that you can't have a wedding Saturday night. (I assume all other restrictions follow.)


6

R. Moshe Feinstein zt"l says (Igros Moshe, vol. 5 (Orach Chaim part 3), no. 80) that one may buy them even during the Nine Days, "because it is solely for the purpose of a mitzvah." (By contrast, he says that one should not buy a new tallis during this time, because it is a garment and is subject to the same laws.)


6

I think it helps to study mishnayos or g'mara (Midos, Tamid, Yoma, P'sachim, perhaps others) about the avoda and miracles in the bes hamikdash. (Likewise, the musafos ("yotz'ros" of musaf) of Yom Kipur.) It gives one a feel for what's missing. Reading the ArtScroll kinos helps one focus on the loss and gives an idea of the difference that the churban made ...


6

Seth, all of the detailed laws regarding when you don't have to worry about listening to music and when you do are really just applications of a single broader law: When Av comes around, we restrict our joy. Actions that are done for joy are improper. If they are done for other reasons, thats OK. For example, building for joy is prohibited. So I can't ...


6

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein says yes, "if needed". (I.e. there's a legitimate reason why you couldn't do the wedding a day or two earlier.) His cousin-once-removed, Rabbi Joseph Dov Soloveichik, said no. Rabbi Soloveichik's argument: "if the Talmud debated whether the fast starts at night, and some later rabbis thought you start saying the fast-day prayers at ...


6

The Debriciner, Rav Moshe Stern in Shaalos U'Teshuvos Be’er Moshe 3:77 says it is permissible. The reasoning is that the Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 550:2 says that bathing is permitted on the three fasts (Tzom Gedalia, Asara B’Teves, and Shiva Asar B’Tammuz). Although the Acharonim argue on the Michaber and our minhag is to be Machmir, the Pri Megadim says ...


6

The Rama himself actually forbids haircuts starting on the 17th of Tammuz (ShA OC 551:4). In his Darkei Moshe, he cites Minhagim Tirna on Tammuz (written ~1400 CE) which mentions this custom.


5

There are two reasons for not swimming, one applying more than the other: The Mishna Berurah 549:1 has a piece explaining that the purpose of the fast is a means toward introspection and teshuva. He concludes that those who fast and go on pleasure walks have grabbed the unimportant (tafel) and abandoned the important (ikar). A second point is brought in ...


5

First, let's address the issue of shaving during the 3 weeks generally. According to R' YB Soloveichik, Shiurei HaRav Al Inyanei Aveilut V'Tisha B'Av, pp. 20-21, there is "a basis for shaving one's beard during this period. He contends that the observances of the three week mourning period are patterned after the twelve month period of mourning that one ...


5

Not having a television, and not being a big music guy anyways, I've only seen bits of the program at my fathers house while it was on, and that was many years ago. Nevertheless from memory and/or assumption I would suggest the following issues: T.V. in and of itself isn't so poshut (simple, i.e. it isn't a given that it is permitted in the first place, I ...


5

When I was a student at Yeshivat Har Etzion, R' Binyamin Tabory gave a Shi'ur on Ma'aseh Rav, based on the Rav's teachings and Minhagim. When he discussed Sefirah, the Three Weeks, etc., he said that if, hypothetically, one could go to a movie at all (which he did not feel was so simple, for reasons relating to issues of modesty - he said he once went to a ...


5

Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 551:17 says: טוב ליזהר מלומר שהחיינו בין המצרים על פרי או על מלבוש אבל על פדיון הבן אומר ולא יחמיץ המצוה It is good to avoid saying Shehechianu in the three weeks on a fruit or clothing, but on a Pidyon HaBen he says it and doesn't postpone the Mitzvah. The Magein Avraham (s.v. ולא יחמץ המצוה) quotes the Maharil as saying ...


4

Nitei Gavriel Bain HaMatzarim page 101 says that one may get engaged during the period of 17 Tamuz - 29 Tamuz, however no music or dancing is allowed. Page 102 says that according to Ashkenazik custom we do not get married the entire 3 weeks, however Sefardic custom is to allow weddings during the period of 17 Tamuz - 29 Tamuz. Page 105 says that one is ...


4

This article by Rabbi Dr. Asher Meir of the Orthodox Union cites the same Shulkhan Aruch passage, and implicitly rules that it is still in effect.


4

Visit. The ruins are still sitting there.


4

The Mishna Berura (OC 551 sk 32) rules that one may shave or take a haircut to look nice for Shabbat if one generally does that action at least once a week.


4

The Askenazi may attend and fully paticipate in dancing at the wedding (Rivevos Epraim 6:298,Nattie Gavriel 14:10 FOOTNOTE 20)


4

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus2 3:1 says that the prohibition of cutting hair beyond 30 days is only for a parent, which requires one to be told that he looks unkempt prior to taking a haircut. For one who is mourning a child or sibling the prohibition is only for 30 days and then may cut his hair immediately after the 30 days whenever he wants because the Aveilus ...


4

All surgery that can safely be postponed until after Tisha B'Av should be postponed. See R. Simcha Bunim Cohen's Halachos for Daily Living, volume on the Three Weeks and Fast Days. Published by ArtScroll.


3

Source: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 122: During the 3 week you can shave/haircut if: You're a Mohel, Sandek or father a boy having a Bris Until Rosh Chodesh, for somebody whose Shloshim ended on or after 18 Tamuz (KSA 122:14) You can trim your mustache if it interferese with your eating (KSA 122:4)


3

See SA YD Siman 245:10, The teacher should not strike him (the student) harshly only lightly. Also see the Mishna (Makkos 8) and the Gemara on it (8b). Also see here and here.


3

The Three Weeks are those days between 17 Tamuz, when the walls around Yerushalaim were breached by Titus's army, and 9 Av, when the Bais Hamikdash was actually destroyed. It would have been a period of heavy fighting, more than just a siege. As to your second question: The Gemara (Tanis) doesn't mention a mourning period starting from 17 Tamuz. It's an ...


3

Shulchan Arukh, Orach Chayyim 551:6: כלים חדשים בין לבנים בין צבועים בין של צמר בין של פשתן אסור ללבוש בשבת זה ( ואנו מחמירין מראש חודש ואילך): New clothes, whether they are white or colored, whether made from wool or flax are forbidden to be worn on this Shabbat (and we are stringent not to do so from Rosh Hodesh Av onwards.) See Magen Avraham ...


2

There are 2 issues. The first is the happiness of wearing fresh clothes. This applies from Rosh Chodesh until after Tish'a b'Av (specifically 1/2 day on the 10th for Ashkenazim). Shulchan Aruch 551:6. Garments meant to absorb sweat are not worn for happiness, but to prevent being uncomfortable. So the custom is to wear fresh pajamas and undergarments. I ...


2

There was a big fight over this in Israel, I believe during the 70's / 80's. The chief rabbinate was dominated by Ashkenazim and they forbade weddings during the three weeks. One of the many things Rav. Ovadia Yosef is known for was his fight for Sephardi traditions, one of which is that weddings are allowed during the three weeks: Rabbi Ovadia Yosef ZT”L ...


2

From Halachically Speaking (Vol 6, Issue 8), "The Three Weeks": There is a discussion among the poskim if one has to refrain from the actions which are not done during the three weeks from the morning of Shiva Asar B’tamuz or even the night before? Most poskim say that one should refrain from doing these activities even from the night before, from ...


2

On the surface level, yes, but more importantly is whether one should. The three weeks are a rather auspicious time and over the centuries Jews have tried to prevent taking on major activities during that time. My recommendation would be to hold off until after 9th of Av, the 15th is especially an auspicious day to get married. There are also questions of ...


2

In O.C. Siman 551, the Rema, who extends the issurim of the week of tisha b'av to the previous Rosh chodesh, permits wearing "linen garments" for the honor of Shabbos. [ The Magen Avraham (14) extends this to washing clothes on Thursday for Shabbos. The Magen Avraham then brings the Darkei Moshe who says that the practice was not to wash in honor of ...



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