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7

Only vessels owned by Jews have to be toiveled. Since the Glenfidich owners are probably non-Jews they don't have to toivel their machinery - and even if they did it would be meaningless.


7

Only kelim (vessels) which absorbed issur (forbidden substances) need to be kashered. A kli which may have issur stuck to the surface, but not absorbed should be scrubbed. Keilim which were only used with kosher are clear to be toiveled. See Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 121. Another point concerning old keilim is to make sure there is nothing on the surface ...


6

In terms of the dipping itself: You should make sure that the entire vessel, as it is intended to be used, is immersed. That means that if pieces are meant to come apart, you should separate them, and you should make sure that the water gets into everywhere that it needs to get. This sometimes involves turning things upside down to release air-bubble ...


5

Practically speaking, no food is ever placed directly on the oven rack save for bread to be warmed or toasted. As such one can rely on Rabbi Moshe Feinstein who says in his Igros Moshe Yoreh Deah 3 siman 24 that toasters don't need tevila being that you are not cooking or preparing the bread, but rather just drying it. And while its true that this drying is ...


4

In order for a mikvah to be kosher, it must hold a minimum of 40 se'ah. That's a little under 200 gallons, so a bucket of water wouldn't do it (unless it's a very large bucket).


3

Having lived in several places, i've been to my share of mikvaot. The first thing to do is contact the rabbi or someone else to get some basic information, such as when it's open, and how to get in. Some charge, others don't. Many (most?) places have a separate mikvah keilim besides for the people-mikvah. Once you've gotten in, it's simple enough. Bring ...


3

Raw earthware (terra cotta, i.e. flowerpot finish) does not require an immersion. (Immersion is for things that can become ritually impure, then ritually pure again. Clay can't become repurified, therefore no immersion is required. Porcelain is glazed earthenware. Hence some rabbis treat it as glass, which requires immersion; and others ignore the glaze and ...


2

Tosfos says explicitly (A"Z 75b sv אבל שואלין לא) that a utensil borrowed from another Jew would still be obligated in tevila - once the object is owned by a Jew, it becomes obligated in tevilas kelim, unlike a case where it's still owned by a non-Jew. Not sure why the star-k article linked to in the question says that, as long as the item still belongs to ...


2

Here in Saint Louis (Missouri), the girls' Jewish high schools impose on their students a community-service requirement (which, I should add in fairness to the students, they meet and exceed). One of the high schools' girls happen to advertise their services immersing dishes, and the same may possibly be true of a Jewish high school local to you. More likely ...


1

As far as I can tell from the Star-K and the Kof-K you linked to, an overwhelming collection of traditional Jewish sources would obligate the grill in tevilah. Thus I would be very surprised to find such a leniency, and it would be hard to rely on it even if it does exist. Perhaps (and I speculate) what you have seen / what has confused others about the ...


1

A mikvah for vessels has the same requirements as a women's mikvah. As it says here This is interpreted by the Talmud to mean that the vessels should be purified by immersion in the waters used by a niddah for her purification—a mikvah. So a women's mikvah can be used to immerse vessels. If a vessel/container drops into a women's mikvah, it does ...


1

See Yoreh Deah siman 120 siff 8 where the Ramma explicitly says that a non food item utensil can not be used even temporarily for food. But there is an interesting side point where we find that a utensil which does not need tevila but might come to be used for food should be toveled anyway, as a precautionary measure, albeit without a bracha. See there siff ...


1

Assuming that a reusable glass bottle would need tevila if you choose to keep it for long term use, which may or not be true, but lets start with that assumption. In order to change a nonjewish made keli into a jewish made keli in order to nullify the need for tevila, a two step process is necessary according to the Shach in Yoreh Deah siman 120 siff ...


1

One should hold it loosely or dip his hand in mikva water first in order that the whole kli gets toiveled. source: Shulchan Aruch 120:3 : צריך שיהא הכלי רפוי בידו בשעת טבילה שאם מהדקו בידו הוי חציצה ואם לחלח ידו במים‏ תחלה אין לחוש. (ודוקא שלחלח ידיו במי מקוה אבל לא במים תלושים) (משמע ממרדכי פרק השוכר)‏:‏ One dipping is halachicly mandated ...



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