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14

According to this article summing up the laws of Tevilat Kelim: There is no halachic basis for the common misconception that non-disposable utensils may be used once without immersion. The footnote says this comes from Tevilat Keilim by Rabbi Tzvi Cohen, pg 101. I don't have access to the sefer, so I don't know if he brings a reason for the common ...


11

Tevilath Kelim (by R. Zvi Cohen) 8:6 says that you shouldn't immerse it. In the footnote there he cites Mekor Chaim 14, who says that this is because the giver didn't buy the utensil with the intent to use it for food preparation. (CYLOR, of course.)


11

Shevet HaLevi 6:245:2 rules that he would have to tovel them with a bracha. He doesn't distinguish if they were toveled already beforehand and I fail to see why that would make a difference. Tzitz Eliezer 22:49 rules that they should be toveled without a bracha, reasoning that perhaps the tevillah of the person works to 'elevate' him along with all his ...


10

http://www.youngisrael.org/content/PDFs/Halacha_Central/Halochoscope/hs14-10a.pdf A thermometer is used for a different type of measurement. The operative term is tikun ochel, accomplishing some positive change in the food. A utensil used to measure ingredients or portions performs such a function. A thermometer is used to decide whether the food ...


10

In Hilchos Tevilas Keilim by Rav Dov Cohen, he brings sources which permit eating using untoveled keilim in someone else's house, although, if memory serves, R. Moshe Feinstein forbade it. It should be noted, that according to Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky and others, one is not obligated to tovel glazed crockery at all, as noted here. Rav Eliezer Melamed notes ...


8

According to the Star-K Tevila Guidelines, no tevila is required for a meat thermometer.


8

What obligates something for immersion is that it is a utensil for eating with or preparing food with "כלי סעודה" Anything else has no obligation. See Shulchan Yoreh Deah 120:1, Aruch HaShulchan 120:30. Example. A mohel needs to peel a orange and the only knife he has to use is his mila knife. So while yes it's a metal utensil, and yes it can be used for ...


7

Another possibility might just be to use a local pond or lake. (Rivers or streams are a possibility too, but there are more halachic issues with those, involving issues of how much groundwater vs. rainwater they contain.) Those generally aren't usable for human mikvaos because of the lack of privacy, but that wouldn't apply to dishes.


7

Only vessels owned by Jews have to be toiveled. Since the Glenfidich owners are probably non-Jews they don't have to toivel their machinery - and even if they did it would be meaningless.


6

Yechave Da'as 4-44 based on the Bais Yosef – a person may dine in a restaurant or hotel where the dishes were not Toiveled. The reason is since the dishes were initially purchased for commercial purposes – to earn a profit – rather than for private use, therefore they do not have to be Toiveled. However a guest in a private home, where the dishes have not ...


6

There is one other "use once before immersing" case, which can also be confusing. Say I buy a glass bowl filled with candies to give as a gift (such things exist). Must the recipient empty out the candies and immerse the bowl immediately, or can they wait to immerse the bowl until all of the candies have been eaten and only then immerse the bowl? The ...


6

Question: All forbid Tevilas Kelim on Shabbos. What is the reason? Answer #1 (Rabah): This is a decree lest one carry them four Amos in Reshus ha'Rabim. Answer #2 (Rav Yosef): It is a decree lest one squeeze (water out of clothing). Question (Abaye): Why is it forbidden to be Tovel Kelim for which this is not a concern ...


6

Do these dishes really belong to the kosher caterer? (If after one use they're handed over to the airline, then I would assume not - unless indeed they have an arrangement where the airline compensates the caterer for them.) If not, then this would be like the case of a Jew borrowing a utensil from a non-Jew, where it doesn't require tevilah (Shulchan Aruch, ...


6

Yes, glass needs tevilah : הקונה מהגוי כלי סעודה של מתכות או של זכוכית, או כלים המצופים באבר מבפנים, אף על פי שהם חדשים, צריך להטבילים במקוה או מעין של ארבעים סאה יברך: על טבילת כלי, ואם הם שנים או יותר, מברך: על טבילת כלים שולחן ערוך יורה דעה קכ:א-ג Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah 120:1,3


6

Poultry scissors: no. From the Star-K: Utensils used exclusively with raw, non-edible food, for instance cookie cutters or a metal tenderizer hammer do not need tevila. (Assuming you only use them for raw poultry.) Can opener: no, again from the Star-K. Can Opener No Tevila Nutcracker is an interesting one. Nuts are edible raw; the ...


6

What you are asking - whether smoking can be considered eating/drinking - is actually the subject of a disagreement in the Rishonim. Tosafos (AZ 66b) directly imply that smoking is considered drinking. The Rif (Chullin 32 [in Rif pages]) directly implies otherwise. This all comes to the fore in the Halachic question of ריחא מלתא - whether 'scent is a thing', ...


5

Here's what R' Aaron Felder has in Oholei Yeshurun, Vol. 1, Chapter 3: "Laws of Tevilas Keilim", Section 5: "Utensils Not Requiring Tevilah": 3) A utensil that does not come in contact with food, does not require tevilah. (124) Here's my translation of Footnote 124, which is in Hebrew: Shulchan Aruch Yoreh De'a 120:4. See Tevilat Keilim 1:7, who ...


5

Not according to R' Moshe. The pans that I have used do not last long. If you don't cut a hole in them, the heat will eventually thin it out.


5

According to R' Moshe Shternbuch, T'Shuvot V'Hanhagot 3:259 (mis-attributed in footnote 30 of this document to 4:192), one is only exempt from immersing the vessel if he throws it out immediately after the first use. If one decides to use it more than once, or if the local custom is to use it more than once, it requires tevilah. In 4:192, he says that when ...


5

CYLOR regarding following R' Dovid Miller's instructions. If I remember correcty, he allows the use of tap water through a rubber connection. Nowadays, most do not rely on this, but may be lenient for rabbinic or keli use.


5

The Gemara (Kiddushin 18a and Nazir 61a) states that "a non-Jew inherits from his father according to Torah law," and this is cited as halachah in Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 283:1. So the utensil would presumably belong to the non-Jewish heir, and therefore still not require tevilah until it's returned. That said, though, Rema there cites Mordechai ...


5

Practically speaking, no food is ever placed directly on the oven rack save for bread to be warmed or toasted. As such one can rely on Rabbi Moshe Feinstein who says in his Igros Moshe Yoreh Deah 3 siman 24 that toasters don't need tevila being that you are not cooking or preparing the bread, but rather just drying it. And while its true that this drying is ...


4

Another thing that may have happened -- and this is pure speculation -- is if you have to run out and buy a new pot ten minutes before shabbos and don't have time to dunk it in the mikva, you can temporarily gift it to a non-Jew who will loan it to you; then it's not owned by a Jew and it doesn't need dunking. Again that's a short-term fix if you're in a ...


4

TL;DR: Consult your LOR. The CRC's website has a convenient chart of items that need toiveling, and for those that can't be toiveled, what should be done. For example: Coffee Maker - Glass parts - Tevilla. Machine - "clean well, do not use for 24 hours, and then run through one cycle" (Note that the CRC includes this paragraph:) Under no ...


4

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch Chapter 162 (translation here) talks about ritual immersion in a river, and cautions that according to many Rabbis, if the river's water is from rainwater (and not a spring) it is not valid. See there for more details.


4

The OU has the following on their website. Secondly, the determination of tevilah depends on the owner's designated use for the object: a utensil purchased for non-food purposes and occasionally used to hold food (such as a screwdriver which might be used in a pinch in the absence of a fork) does not require tevilah (Aruch Hashulchan, Y.D. ...


4

R' Usher Weiss shlita (Minchas Osher) argues that he doesn't have to, based on the Chazon Ish's principle (Shvi'is 7) that if there's a halacha that comes up all the time and is not a fringe case, and nobody (mishna, gemoro, rishonim, poskim) mentions it, that is an indication that there is no such halacha. This is such a case, since it's relevant every time ...


4

According to the Orthodox Union, kashrut.com, and askmoses.com, a saltshaker needs immersion, and that need is definite enough that we say the b'racha on the immersion. However, that's assuming it's of metal (or glass). According to those pages, unglazed ceramic/earthenware does not require immersion and glazed ceramic (porcelain) requires immersion, but ...


3

Tevilas keilim may be done by day or night, except Shabbos or Yom Tov. In case of great necessity, where one needs to use an untoveled keili on Shabbos or Yom Tov, the utensil should be given to a non-Jew as a present and the Yehudi should borrow it back. After Shabbos, if the Yehudi re-purchased the utensil from the non-Jew, it must be ...



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