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Rashi, a central commentator explains the biblical verse from Zecharyah 8:10 which he understands to refer to someone who leaves Torah study to study anything else. The Talmud then discusses others who have no peace. This section mentions someone who chooses to leave one source of learning and jump to another (and it seems, does so still expecting the same ...


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This seems to be dependent on the text of the Talmudic passage in Chagiga 10a. In conformance with the printed text of Rashi's commentary, the printed Talmud states: כיון שיוצא אדם מדבר הלכה לדבר מקרא - שוב אין לו שלום. ושמואל אמר: זה הפורש מתלמוד למשנה, ורבי יוחנן אמר: אפילו מתלמוד לתלמוד. "Rav said once a person leaves matters of halacha for ...


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At night (until midnight) is one of them see http://www.dailyhalacha.com/m/halacha.aspx?id=2539 Good luck!


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Judaism often relates to descriptions such as son and father as metaphorical, regarding the relationship between God and the Jewish people. The daat mikra Tanach explains the psalm to be divided into 4 parts with different speakers, verses 1-3 being the non Jewish nations, 4-6 being God to the nations 7-9 being the king relating God's words to him and 10-12 ...


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perhaps it means regarding his mental state as the Chovos Halevavos writes in the intro to the shaar bitachon: One who trusts in G-d is secure against mishaps, and his heart is assured against future (potential) bad things. Whatever comes to him from G-d, he will accept with joy and gladness and his livelihood comes to him peacefully, quietly, and ...


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I wonder if "Na'ar" and "zakein" are significant in this possuk. And also, it seems to be missing out a reference to the middle of his life? Perhaps these are two stages of life at which one can see beyond, to some degree. So I suggest Dovid Hamelech did have a vision that went beyond what most of us humans can see. And he realized that Tzadikim are never ...


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This question was once asked to Rav Yonatan Eybeschutz. He replied: We Jews only know of the major plots concocted to exterminate us; the non-Jews, however know how many additional plans of theirs were thwarted by G-d. Thus, at the end of days (as per Radak and general understanding), having been forced to recognize G-d's hand, they will praise Hashem 'for ...


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Radak explain this as a reference to yemos haMoshiah, when Am Israel will be redeemed and all nations will come to recognize Hashem. This would explain why the other nations will praise G-d from what He will have done for us. See Isaiah in 2:3-4 and Micah 4:2-3.


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Perhaps this is close to what you are looking for... http://www.judaica-world.com/family-illustrated-tehillim-maroon.html DETAILS Published by the World Wide Tehillim Club an all-new Illustrated Family Tehillim has just been released. For the first time ever, each perek of Tehillim is prefaced by a short paragraph consisting of a core message, background ...



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