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7

The reason is that Job was not dictated to Moses by Hashem for the purpose of being put into the Torah. The words of the Torah were specifically for the history, halachos, and hashkafa of Bnei Yisrael. Thus Moshe wrote it at the lower level of nevua set up for Kesuvim. The Chumash is like the Neviim in that they were given as a message by Hashem to the Navi ...


6

Midrash Tehillim on mizmor 3 - see it here 3 lines from the top of the page. דבר אחר מזמור לדוד בברחו. זהו שאמר הכתוב לא ידע אנוש ערכה איוב כח יג), אמר רבי אלעזר לא ניתנו פרשיותיה של תורה על הסדר, שאס ניתנו על חםדר, כל מי שהוא קןרא בהם היה יכול להחיות מתים, ולעשות מופתים, לכך נתעלמה סדורה של תורה וכו The parshiyos of the Torah were not given ...


6

Rashi wrote the following in his commentary on Ps. 14: David recited two psalms in this Book, in one manner [with almost identical wording]: the first one concerning Nebuchadnezzar and the second one (ch. 53) concerning Titus. In this one, he prophesied concerning Nebuchadnezzar, who was destined to enter the Temple and to destroy it, with not one [man] ...


5

Neither the Leningrad nor Aleppo codices have that spelling. Nor does the Mikraot Gedolot haKeter critical edition. As per @NoamSienna, it appears your version has an error.


5

Indeed, in a number of places here in Israel, Tehillim are read publicly on a daily basis from Tehillim scrolls written on parchment. According to many authorities, there is also a special bracha that is to be recited prior to reading material from Ketuvim out of a parchment scroll: ברוך אתה ה' א-להינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וציונו לקרוא בכתבי הקודש ...


5

Machzor Vitri - page 114 says we say the verse Orech Yamim twice in order to complete the name of Hashem that is produced by doing so. וכופלין אורך ימים כדי להשלים השם היוצא ממנו Tashbatz 258, Maharam says we say it twice this way it has the numerical value of Kohanim, since the Chashmonoim when they went to war said 7 times Vyehi Noam and twice Orech Yamim ...


4

The Gemara in Bava Batra 14b-15a mentions various authors of Tehillim besides for King David. דוד כתב ספר תהלים ע"י עשרה זקנים ע"י אדם הראשון על ידי מלכי צדק ועל ידי אברהם וע"י משה ועל ידי הימן וע"י ידותון ועל ידי אסף ועל ידי שלשה בני קרח [King] David wrote Sefer Tehillim "with help" from Elders: Adam HaRishon Malki Tzedek Avaraham Avinu Moshe ...


4

While I am not aware that there is any authoritative list, It seems that among several that are coomonly said is Tehillim 121. I believe this was chosen as a general Tehillim to be said for people who are ill as well as people in danger, such as soldiers. The reason is because it starts with the phrase "I lift my eyes to the mountains, from where will ...


4

The word "חַטָּאִים‏" (with a Patach under the Chet and a Dagesh Chazak in the Tet) means sinners. See for example Tehillim 25:8. The word "חֲטָאִים‏" (with a Chataf-Patach under the Chet) means sins. See for example Kohelet 10:4. Without punctuation the word can be read both ways. Bruria is telling R' Meir that praying for them to die is not ...


3

In my experience, people do as you did: use the verses for the corresponding medial letter where there's a final letter in a name. I've seen this done for the very name you ask about, מִרְיָם, actually (among others).


3

Rivevos Ephraim 6:309:1 notes that the Arizal instituted the seven times; he also cites the Imrei Emes ( קרח שנת תרע"ו ) who cites the Arizal and gives a reason; see there. See also Likutei Maharich 3:70. In addition: The Tamei Minhagim 717 brings that there are 587 letters n the psalm; 587 is the gematria of the word Shofar with itself (im hakollel).


3

Let's begin with authorship. Both psalms include the header "לדוד", which many believe points to authorship by David. However, merely the header by itself is no proof that David actually wrote the psalm. First, "לדוד" could mean anything: "by David", "for David", "about David", or even "in the style of David". Second, we do not know who appended the headers ...


2

The sefer חנוכת התורה here answers that this difference can be explained according to the halachah that it is permissible to benefit from broken pieces of an idol, but if one finds a hand or a foot by itself it is forbidden, because such things are worshipped by themselves. Thus with all the other parts of the body such as eyes and ears it says "they have" ...


2

Emunas Itecha 2 - Parshas Balak - Rabbi Moshe Wolfson Shlita says that similar to Succos where every day we go around the Bima once and on Hoshana Raba seven times on Shabbos we say Mizmor L'David once by each Seuda and three times by Shalosh Seudos, as Shalosh Seudos is Kollel all the Seudos.


2

There is an ashkenazi trop for Tehillim, Mishlei, and Iyov (טעמי אמ"ת) but it was reconstructed from the Sephardic tradition. KAJ in Washington Heights chants Tehillim 29 with that trop on Friday nights. You can buy software to learn Ta'amei emet, and find sample mp3s from the software here.


2

There was an Ashkenazi Tehillim trop mesorah, but it was lost about half a century ago: R' Yisroel Rabinovich of Monsey, NY, is a master baal koreh and baal dikduk. He told me that as a young Yerushalmi boy, he met the last living man who knew the Ashkenazi cantillations for Tehillim. Unfortunately, at the time, neither R' Rabinovich, nor anyone else ...


2

Having conducted a number of searches online (in both Hebrew and English), I've come to the conclusion that this quote is likely a paraphrase of something, and not a straight translation of anything. My suspicion is that it refers to Midrash Tehillim 119:99. The quote in Tehillim (Psalms) to which the midrash refers reads as follows: מכל מלמדי השכלתי כי ...


2

The whole statement in the Talmud in context, Maseches Shabbos 118b, is: א"ר יוסי יהא חלקי מגומרי הלל בכל יום איני והאמר מר הקורא הלל בכל יום הרי זה מחרף ומגדף כי קאמרינן בפסוקי דזמרא Rabbi Yosi says "Let my portion be among those who complete Hallel every single day." This can't be, doesn't Master say "One who reads Hallel every day - this is a ...


2

In the Metsudah Tehillem and http://www.tehilimhotline.org/prayer_categories.asp it says which chapters should be said at which occaison, the one's pertaining to this matter would be(I think): For the Jewish People 43, 79, 80, 83 For help in troublesome times 20, 38, 85, 86, 102, 130, 142 For peace 46 For success 112


2

Based on what I've seen, Psalm 130 is also commonly recited with 121. Additionally, it would appear to me that Psalm 20 is appropriate based on its references to HaShem fighting for us.


2

The Gemara actually records several opinions as to who wrote Job, and when (or whether) he lived. Therefore, it isn't part of Torah because it isn't clear if it was written by Moses. Bava Bathra 15 You say that Moses wrote... Job. This supports the opinion of R. Joshua b. Levi b. Lahma who said that Job was contemporary with Moses... A certain ...


1

Added to expand the point originally made by @Yishai Note the discussion in Maseches Eruchin 10b of Hallel on Rosh Chodesh (leaving out part of the Tehillim that make up the full Hallel) also brings up this issue. The Talmud (Ta'anit 28b) records that Rav was visiting Bavel and he saw the people reciting Hallel on Rosh Chodesh. Rav wanted to stop the ...


1

I may expand on this answer later, but the short version is: No, the verse does not imply that, and no, you are not denying anything God has done. We don't learn halacha from poetry in Tehillim. That verse isn't implying anything about the stars or their names, other than God is so great that He can name all the stars. Names are subjective, not objective. ...


1

It sounds similar to another phrase found in the Talmud: R. Chanina remarked, "I have learned much from my teachers, more from my colleagues, and the most from my students" (Ta'anis 7a). והיינו דאמר ר' חנינא הרבה למדתי מרבותי ומחבירי יותר מרבותי ומתלמידי יותר מכולן Source: An article on Torah.org from where I got the exact quote.


1

Abarbanel comments on the Rambam's Moreh Nevuchim (2:45) that the Rambam has to say that Tehillim was not written in actual prophecy, and that David was not a prophet. The reason for the redundancy, explains the Abarbanel, is that David could have still been a prophet (had reached the requisite level and have been shown visions of prophecy), but while ...



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