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15

Moreshet.co.il reports: אך האריז"ל הנהיג להוסיף שלשה פסוקים ראשונים ממזמור צ"ה, "לכו נרננה" וכו', כדי לא לסיים בפורענות - "יצמיתם ה' אלקינו", כעין מה שאמרו חז"ל לגבי הפסקה בקריאת התורה: "ואין מפסיקין בקללות", וכן נוהגים בסיום הקריאה של מגילת איכה, שאחרי הפסוק האחרון "כי אם מאס מאתנו" וכו', חוזרים על הפסוק שלפניו: "השיבנו ה' אליך" וכוו, כדי לא ...


9

The Idea in Brief The verse is not speaking about any harm from the sun (or even the moon), but instead speaks to harm that occurs night and day; in this respect, the psalmist speaks to divine protection 24/7, which encompasses the time period during the time of the sun (daytime) and time of the moon (nighttime). Discussion The Tehellim were sung, and the ...


8

Tehillim 22:17 (17 is the counting in Jewish editions) in the Masoretic text reads: יז כִּי סְבָבוּנִי כְּלָבִים עֲדַת מְרֵעִים הִקִּיפוּנִי כָּאֲרִי יָדַי וְרַגְלָי 17 For dogs have surrounded me; a band of evildoers has encompassed me, like a lion, my hands and feet. Rashi: like a lion, my hands and feet: As though they are crushed in a ...


5

According to Talmud (Berachot 60b), the morning blessings are each said associated with specific acts of getting up in the morning: "כי פתח עיניה לימא: "ברוך פוקח עורים"; כי תריץ ויתיב לימא: "ברוך מתיר אסורים When he opens his eyes let him say: "Blessed... Who openest the eyes of the blind." When he straightens himself and sits up let him say : ...


5

The Aleppo, Leningrad, and Damascus Codices all have it Rafeh. Even the original Bomberg Mikraot Gedolot has it Rafeh! Minchat Shai ad loc. comments that it should be Rafeh. I did find that the Codex Bodmer 21 does have it with a Dagesh but given the evidence this should clearly be disregarded. I note all the above sources (even Bodmer) have a Tarcha (a ...


5

Metzudas David thereon apparently understands "b" and "c" to be the same thing. לחזות. לראות בנעימות תורת ה' : ולבקר. לדרוש בהיכלו בדבר מצות ה' Furthermore, Malbim understands "b" and "c" to be the reason for the request "a"; not requests in and of themselves. שבתי בבית ה' כל ימי חיי, הוא על הכוונה כדי לחזות בנועם ה' ולבקר בהיכלו, ואין בלבי כונה ...


5

The Interlinear Artscroll Siddur (Ashkenaz) has a footnote on those verses (page 227) that reads: The next three verses are not part of the psalm of the day, and are not recited in all congregations. They are the beginning of the next psalm and are recited because of their inspiring message that is an apt climax to the song of the day. No source ...


5

Start again from alef (1). There are chassidim who say the chapter for earlier rebbeim also (eg. on that Rebbe's birthday), and they start again from alef. This is what I see people doing, though I'm not sure if there's any documented source for it.


4

Consider Bavli Sanhedrin 22a: אמר רב חנה בר ביזנא אמר רבי שמעון חסידא: המתפלל צריך שיראה עצמו כאילו שכינה כנגדו, שנאמר שויתי ה' לנגדי תמיד.‏ Rav Chana son of Bizna said in the name of Rabbi Shimon Chasida: One who prays must see himself as if the Shechina were opposite him, as it says, "I have set the LORD always before me."


4

I was taught that the reason is based on the Gemara (Ta'anis 29a & Arochin 11b): אמרו: כשחרב בית המקדש בראשונה, אותו היום ערב תשעה באב היה, ומוצאי שבת היה, ומוצאי שביעית היתה, ומשמרתה של יהויריב היתה, והלוים היו אומרים שירה ועומדין על דוכנם. ומה שירה היו אומרים? {תהילים צד-כג} וַיָּשֶׁב עֲלֵיהֶם אֶת אוֹנָם וּבְרָעָתָם יַצְמִיתֵם ולא הספיקו לומר ...


3

Okay, I do not have any Talmud or later sources, but my gut impression upon reading the Psalm is: This Psalm was written by captive Judeans, quite possibly Temple singers, using the emotional energy of their situation to do something artistic, as has been done for a long long time before and since. They did a classic, immortal job of it! It PERFECTLY ...


3

Malbim Beur Hamilot explains: הקרב הוא מה שמתאבקים מקרוב וזאת עושים בכח היד, והמלחמה הוא מרחוק וזאת צריך אימון האצבעות לשלוח חציו למטרה קרב (battle) refers to swordfighting here. This is done with the hands. מלחמה (war) is shooting arrows, which requires skilled fingers.


3

The Siddur Rav Amram Gaon includes the initial verse. Abudirham (nefillas apaim, ashrei, una letzion) writes that the reason for the addition of this verse, is that this verse is the source in the Talmud (B'rachos 30b) for practice of waiting a certain amount of time before prayer for one's thoughts to settle. ומה שמוסיפין בתחילת המזמור אשרי יושבי ביתך ...


3

Rav Yosef Ber Soloveitchik (hereafter, “the Rav”) would sit for Ashrei, as implied by the Rambam מהל' תפילה פ"ט ה"ח. The Rav explained that by sitting together the group establishes itself as a congregation. -"השראה לה': תפילת לליל שבת לפי נוסח הגרי"ד סולובייצ'יק" - Edited and commentary by Micha Berger , page 1 fn. 1 (alt. link ...


3

A late answer, I know, but a different one (and, I must say that I still don't understand some of the claims made in the other answer so this one is as reasonable, but I can't find a source for it). The Birnbaum siddur Hasiddur Hashalem writes (page 310): ארך ימים is repeated so that the number of verses of this psalm reach a total of seventeen, the ...


3

The popular sidur "תפלת כל פה" has a list of all the red-letter days' daily psalms. It says that 104 is said on rosh chodesh Teves (and also on Shabas rosh chodesh, by the way).


3

Maaseh Rav 157 (a work documenting the practices of the Vilna Gaon) records the answer according to the tradition you ask about: אין אומרים שיר של יום של יומו ואומרים במקומו בב' ימים דר"ח ברכי נפשי (מזמור ק"ד) שהוא שיר של ר"ח ודוחה אפי' של שבת ופשיטא של חנוכה [On Rosh Chodesh] the Song of the Day for that day [of the week] is not said, and in its place ...


2

I've just been researching pronouns, which I've always had problems understanding, and came across the answer to my own question! The tsere yod being the link between a plural noun and the suffix (in this case 'their'). Hoping perhaps that finding the answer to my confusion will help someone else.


2

In the Medrash on Tehillim Rebbe Elazar says this.


2

Buber says there are two traditional attributions. One is by Rabbi Avraham [sic] HaSefardi in Ohel Yosef, where he attributes it to Rabbi Yochanan (the redactor of the Talmud Yerushalmi). However Buber himself must be making an error, as the author of Ohel Yosef (published uncensored under the name Tzefas Paneach - a famous and controversial pirush on the ...


2

It's the verse Ⅰ Chronicles 16:32. The entire passage surrounding that verse in p'suke d'zimra is from Chronicles there.


2

Two possible explanations, according to Rash"i's commentary (who, BTW, cites 2 others - so it's not his own idea :-): Rashi on Psalms 27:4:1: ולבקר בהיכלו . ליראות שם בכל בקר ובקר כך פירשו דונש , ומנחם חברו עם לא יבקר בין טוב לרע ( ויקרא כ"ו ) , אבל דונש פתר לשון בוקר : My partial translation & expansion of Rash"i: To be seen daily (i.e. from ...


2

The earliest source I could find is the באר היטב in Shulchan Aruch סימן נד - דינים השיכים לישתבח where he says in the name of the Magen Avraham: ב) ליוצר. בכתבים כתוב לומר ביו''ד ימי תשובה מזמור ממעמקים קראתיך ה' בין ישתבח ליוצר וצ''ע. מ''א ‏ "The custom brought in the בכתבים is to say the Tehillim of ממעמקים between Yishtabach and Yotzer - and ...


2

As I often find, Beurei Hatefillah has an answer: Citing Machzor Vitri ch. 1: This is the reason that we repeat the last line of Tehillim: Kol Hanishama T’Hallel Yah Halleluya. It is based on what we learned in Tractate Shabbos that we should be among those who complete Hallel each day. This means that we should read the last chapters of Tehillim ...


2

Many predators are more active during full moons, wolves are the classic example. Lions on the other hand wait until just after a full moon to become more active, as the moon rises later in the evening and thus affords the lion some time after sunset with total darkness. In some areas, though, small mammals actually can see their predators better during a ...


1

Chapter 127 and 128 both include prayers for successful children. Chapter 119 is a general prayer for spiritual success, and would also be appropriate.


1

Metzudat Zion on Psalms 121:3:2: ינום . מלשון תנומה והוא שינה מועטת וקלה : My translation: The word יָנוּם comes from the (noun) תנומה meaning a light and "short" sleep. In other words, שנה is a longer sleep, like what you do at night. תנומה would be what some call a "twilight" sleep. Like the "sleep" you do at your work desk, sometimes. (Of course, ...


1

There are so many thoughts that come to mind in regard to your question. It's difficult to know where to start. In general, recital of Tehillim have the characteristic of removing anything which blocks or obstructs blessings from HaShem. So in that context, don't think that your recital of any particular chapter is somehow failing to help your friend. In ...


1

It’s basically chazal’s version of The Praises. It is a way to distinguish it from random praises. It is a formal noun. Another example is that Teffilin is called teffilin to make it a formal noun, and to distinguish it from tefillot.


1

Rosh HaShannah is called the birthday of the world. (HaYom haras olam...see machzor mussaf) However, the pinnacle of creation is Adam, the first man. Therefore, Rosh HaShannah is the birthday of Adam. (the world's birthday is represented by Adam's birthday.) The first three words of the pasuk (HaYotzer yachad libam...)can be translated: "The One who forms ...



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