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12

A couple of possibilities, culled from midrashim and commentaries: Keli Yakar to Deut. 15:10, and Malbim on this verse (Ps. 37:25), say that it means that you will never find that both the tzaddik and his children will be poor; it may be that one or the other of them will be, though. The Midrash (Vayikra Rabbah 35:2) takes נעזב in the active sense: "even ...


12

In the sefer נפוצות יהודה, the explanation is given as follows: Yitzchak represents מדת הדין. Since it was this that was responsible for the destruction of the temples and our exiles, the Tanach hints that eventually, מדת הדין will be dropped in favor of מדת הרחמים in the time of redemption. Since the redemption consists of four stages, as alluded to by the ...


12

This article, by Prof. Rivka Ulmer, might answer some of your questions... She writes (pg. 108): "Prior to the attestation in the New Testament, there is no evidence of Psalm 22 being used in a Jewish messianic context... Jewish interpretations of the Psalm identify the individual in the Psalm with a royal figure, alternatively interpreted as King David, ...


11

A core belief of Judaism is that there is only one God. This is a bad translation. The Hebrew is: אֲנִי-אָמַרְתִּי, אֱלֹהִים אַתֶּם; וּבְנֵי עֶלְיוֹן כֻּלְּכֶם.‏ The word אֱלֹהִים can mean "God". It can also mean Judge, Idolatrous god/power (note the distinction between God and gods), Important Person. In this context, others translate it as ...


11

All three books (Iyov Mishlei and Tehillim) are written in a complex poetic style. The separate trop represents the shift from prose to poetry and may have been sung in a more songful manner than the regular prose trop. A proof to this distinction lies in Iyov, whose first, second and final chapters are written in prose and have regular trop. EDIT: The ...


11

Medrash (Tehilim) Shochar Tov says that Moshe gave us the 5 books of Torah and David gave us Tehilim which also has 5 books.


10

The g'mara in B'rachos (4B) explains that 'נ' represents downfall [of the nation] and is therefore encompassed in the positive context of the putative next pasuk, which states that "God supports all of the fallen".


10

In his new "Koren Sacks" siddur, Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks renders it (not an exact quote) "I never looked on while a tzaddik was abandoned..."; that is, it is a declaration (or aspiration) of the person who recites the prayer, of his response to poverty, etc.


10

Rashi, Radak, ibn Ezra and the M'tzudos all seem to say it means "you have caused me to hear" your command, i.e. informed me of it, though literally, yes, it means "you have dug me ears".


9

I thought it was read: And I never saw a righteous person who felt abandoned, even if his children were begging for bread.


9

Rashi's commentary seems to indicate that it refers to the plight of the Jewish Nation in Exile.


9

A good place to look to find refutations of Christian messianic interpretations of the bible is Sefer Nitzachon, printed in Otzar Vikuchim by Dr. J. D. Eisenstein. This is his answer to this specific case (p. 256): The Christian claim is that Jesus was crying to G-d, his father, "Why have you abandoned me?" at the time he was being executed. But according ...


7

At one point as a young student I was informed that a neighbor's wife had become seriously ill, and I began reciting a very lengthy regimen of Tehillim for her every morning after Shaharith, including sections of 119 spelling her name. This made me very late for Shi'ur on a frequent basis, and my Rav finally asked me why I was so late so often. When I told ...


7

Apparently, it's due to a misinterpretation of the m'sora. By the rules of grammar, both should be mil'el, but, according to the m'sora, both are mil'ra. The m'sora was misinterpreted to mean that hoshia is mil'el while hatzlicha is mil'ra, and that's the way people read it now. Source: an old mesorah-listserv thread on the topic, in particular one message ...


7

The Tzemach Tzedek (Lubavitch) wrote, that if we only knew the power of saying Psalms, and the positive spiritual effect they had we would say them constantly! See this video: Hayom Yom Shevat 24. And the text can be found here


7

The reason is that Job was not dictated to Moses by Hashem for the purpose of being put into the Torah. The words of the Torah were specifically for the history, halachos, and hashkafa of Bnei Yisrael. Thus Moshe wrote it at the lower level of nevua set up for Kesuvim. The Chumash is like the Neviim in that they were given as a message by Hashem to the Navi ...


6

The Minchas Shay on that pasuk says that there are sources for both versions.


6

The division of Tehilim into days of the week and days of the month was done by the 14th century scholar Rabbeinu Menachem ben Zorach, a Talmid of Rabbeinu Yehuda ben HaRosh. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=39362&st=&pgnum=256 וכבר חלקתי ספר תהילים לאמר חלק ממנו בבל יום ויום בענין שיקראהו המתנדב לשבח ולהודות בכל חדש פעם אחת והנני ...


6

Also, there's a widespread Sephardic custom to read the Book of Iyov publicly on Tisha BeAv. I don't know whether they use the trop, but I would assume that they do, like any other public reading.


6

Rada"k (on ch. 3) is of the opinion that it is a term of elevation, in this case indicating elevation of the voice in reciting the word/line/psalm in which it appears. The word appears only in T'hilim and Chavakuk, which are both poetic. (He cites as a proof text Y'sha'ya 62:10, in which the same root refers to clearing a path.)


6

In my Sefer Ish Emunot (Orah Haim 1:25) I wrote a pretty lengthy discussion about this. First of all, we have to know the Mishna Berura (Orah Haim 1:11) brings the Shela (Shaar HaOtiot 85a) that brings down to say Al Naharot on days when Tahanun is said. However, on days where it is omitted, he says to say Beshuv Hashem etc (sources to support the M"B - Kaf ...


6

I heard that Malbim discusses this issue. While he holds you can say that it was written at the time of the Churban, he also discusses how it could have been written by David. He raises two issues: What would people have thought about such a mizmor before the churban? What would happen to the mizmor if they did teshuvah and there was no churban? He ...


6

First of all, what you say is not exactly true. It might be the case that every English translation that you have seen understands the word to mean morning - and most probably because it is preceded by the verb "to rise" - but there are Hebrew commentaries that understand it in line with this gemara. Both the Radak and the Metzudat Tziyon understand the word ...


6

Rabbi Shmuel of Lubavitch, the Rebbe Maharash asks this question in a discourse (Toras Shmuel 5632 Chelek 1 pg. 164) and explains as follows: There are two types of chesed (kindness): a "worldly" kindness ("chesed olam"), and a kindness that supersedes the natural order of things ("rav chesed"). While the regular, worldly type of kindness contradicts and ...


6

One of the best ways to tell if books are separate is by looking at the divisions in a scroll. Traditionally, a number of lines are skipped in between books to mark a separation (see my discussion here). Looking at the Aleppo Codex yields just that. Here is the end of Psalm 41: You can clearly see the larger gap in the right column. Textually we find ...


6

In an old Jews for Jesus brochure I saved from my college days, there is a section that quotes several Biblical verses which they say foretell the life of Christ. One of these is Psalms 22:16 (verse 17 in our Bible), which they translate as "They pierced my hands and feet." This supposedly foretells the crucifixion of Jesus where his hands and feet were ...


6

According to Midrash Eicha Zuta, it was written by ירמיה (Jeremiah). This is also reflected in the Septuagint (aka LXX aka Targum Shivim), which opens with the line "By Jeremias, in the Captivity." This is probably the oldest tradition. According to Rashi, Midrash Tehillim (aka Midrash Secher Tov), Pesiqta Rabbatti, Ibn Ezra in his introduction to ...


6

Rashi wrote the following in his commentary on Ps. 14: David recited two psalms in this Book, in one manner [with almost identical wording]: the first one concerning Nebuchadnezzar and the second one (ch. 53) concerning Titus. In this one, he prophesied concerning Nebuchadnezzar, who was destined to enter the Temple and to destroy it, with not one [man] ...


6

Midrash Tehillim on mizmor 3 - see it here 3 lines from the top of the page. דבר אחר מזמור לדוד בברחו. זהו שאמר הכתוב לא ידע אנוש ערכה איוב כח יג), אמר רבי אלעזר לא ניתנו פרשיותיה של תורה על הסדר, שאס ניתנו על חםדר, כל מי שהוא קןרא בהם היה יכול להחיות מתים, ולעשות מופתים, לכך נתעלמה סדורה של תורה וכו The parshiyos of the Torah were not given ...



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