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2

צור חבלי בעת צרה is an idiomatic expression. "צור חבלי" means literally "my rope's rock". It is referring to an anchor. So the plain translation (meaning according to peshat) is "My anchor in times of trouble." There are many ways to give it allegorical meaning as well as according to the Kabbalistic interpretations. But all these other meanings must relate ...


2

The Siddur Shay LaMora quotes the Olas Tamid according to Rashi's first explination to Tehillim 16:5 that it means all good that I have comes from Him.


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I have looked into this a little in the past, so I can't recall particular sources, but the gist of it is as follows: Some wish to translate it as in "חבל נחלתו" and many other instances in which it is used to mean "my lot" or "my portion in life". This would parallel the other phrase "מנת כוסי" in the next line. "צור חבלי" would then mean "the Rock who is ...


4

The Kehot Annotated Siddur translates it as "the strength of my lot in times of distress". The "my lot" would be like Devarim 32:9: יַעֲקֹב, חֶבֶל נַחֲלָתוֹ Jacob the lot of His inheritance The Siddur Shay Lamorah quotes Iyun Tefilah that it means that He is my Rock and Refuge (מעוז) to save me from the pains which grab me at a time of trouble. ...


4

A possible interpretation can be gleaned from the posuk in Yechezkel 27:8 where the term rope is used metaphorically to signify the ones steering the ship. And in Shmuel II 8:2 ropes are used metaphorically to signify control over life and death. Thus in keeping with the theme of the piyut that Hashem is “Master of the world”, we praise Hashem by ...


1

I noticed that the root form of חֶבלִי is חבל meaning "rope". However, I also did a Google translate on the full word חֶבלִי and it displayed the synonym נָחוּת which has one translation as "disadvantaged". This makes sense, in this context, as the word "chaval" is often said to someone when a tragedy or danger is mentioned. See also this site which gives a ...


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Yes, although a person should only make use of this if they do not know how to recite the Tefillah themselves. The question would now be whether or not there is anybody who is unable to recite the Tefillah themselves given that it can be recited in any language you understand (or in Hebrew even if you do not understand, such is the special nature of praying ...


2

A friend of mine once asked R' Ezra Neuberger for advice on how to daven with more kavanah. His answer was "daven fast." Apparently, he held keeping focused is the more important kavanah. The Rambam (Hilchos Tefilah 4:16) defines kavanah as removal of external distractions: כיצד היא הכוונה--שיפנה ליבו מכל המחשבות, ויראה עצמו כאילו הוא עומד לפני השכינה ...


3

Mishnah Brurah Orach Chaim ch. 98 delves into a somewhat detailed discussion of the type of kavanah required. Basically, he emphasizes 2 principles: To concentrate on the meaning of the words To imagine that he is standing before a human king, and therefore he would concentrate hard on what he says so that he avoids stumbling The commentaries elaborate ...


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The Radvaz says (in relation to a different question) that the first silent one is the one for his personal obligation, under the principle of תדיר, and the second is to fulfill the obligation of those who couldn't daven to themselves. It doesn't seem plausible that he would say that in only the case he was dealing with (where the Shatz missed the previous ...


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Rav Moshe Feinstein's rule of thumb is that for quiet portions of the davening, you have your choice of using your nusach or the minyan's. (Though the chazan's own quiet shmoneh esrei should follow what he'll say for the minyan five minutes later.) For parts that are public/out-loud, you should use theirs. I haven't seen him address tachanun, so I would ...


0

You must daven the tachnun according to the nusach you normally daven. The kitzur shulchan oruch says that one cannot chop and change nuschaos as they are all weighted and each word is counted. If you would like to add vidui before tachnun then that's okay, but you should try not say sephardic tachnun when davening in ashkenaz l'moshol. Rav Moshe Feinstein ...


1

Tefillo K'hilchoso 13 (27) says (my translation) Ideally (lechatchilo) one should not start the repetition of the amidah with less than 9 excluding the prayer leader (from the expression in Sh O 124 (1)), because if there are not 9 listening the blessings of the prayer leader are close to being in vain (levatolo). But there are those who are ...


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Only the final time you wake up in the morning.


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The Aruch Hashulchan 91:7 writes כתבו רבותינו בעלי השולחן ערוך בסעיף ו: דרך החכמים ותלמידיהם שלא יתפללו אלא כשהם עטופים. ובעת הזעם יש לחבק הידים בשעת התפילה כעבדא קמי מאריה. ובעת שלום יש להתקשט בבגדים נאים להתפלל. עד כאן לשונו, וכבר כתבנו מזה. ו"חיבוק ידים" הוא שחובק אצבעות ידיו זה בשל זה, כאדם ששובר אצבעותיו כשמצטער. ויש מהחכמים שהיו עושים כן גם ...


2

I'm "extraplocombing" (extrapolating and combining) the answers from your referenced question regarding Shacharit with Mishnah Brura 232:2. See Sha'arei Tzion #4, who points out that since Ma'ariv is reshut (not obligatory) we are not as concerned about the requirement of smichat g'ulah litfilah (loose translation - connecting the concept of redemption as ...


1

Rosh Hashanah 16a: Rav Yosef said: Like whom do we hold that we pray nowadays for the sick and ailing? Like whom? Like Rabbi Yosi! [who says that "a person is judged every day"] And if you'd rather, I'll answer per Rabbi Yitzchak, who said that "crying out is good for a person, whether before or after the verdict." Trans. mine, except words ...


2

Mishna Berura writes (46:2) that the correct pronunciation is with a צירי, making it "yisgadeil v'yiskadeish." The reason he gives for that is that even though kaddish is in Aramaic (which would imply yisgadal, apparently), these two words are meant to be in Hebrew. This phrase is based on a verse (Yechezkel 38:23), which uses the phrase "והתגדלתי והתקדשתי" ...


1

The gemara says (Brachos 60a, on the bottom): אמר רב אחא הנכנס להקיז דם אומר יהי רצון מלפניך יי' אלקי שיהא עסק זה לי לרפואה ותרפאני כי אל רופא נאמן אתה ורפואתך אמת לפי שאין דרכן של בני אדם לרפאות אלא שנהגו Rav Acha said that someone who goes for bloodletting should say "May it be Your Will, Hashem my God, that this practice should be a healing, and ...


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First of all, as Double AA commented, לפניו is not exclusively male. In Hebrew, when referring to a group of males and females, the male form is used. That also applies when the reader is of unknown gender. The Chida (author of Birkei Yosef) wrote this several hundred years ago. In that time, it was not common for women or girls to come to shul at all. ...


4

When asked this question, R' Aharon Leib Shteinman שליט"א replied "ווייל דעם סידור טשעפעט מען נישט" - "because we don't mess with the Siddur" ספר רבבות אפרים או"ח תנה deals with this question at length: 1) He writes that שו"ת זכר יהוסף responds to those who wish to abandon saying it, explaining how the terms רֵישֵׁי גַּלְוָתָא וּלְרֵישֵׁי מְתִיבָתָא, etc. ...


0

Rabbi Binyamin Shmueli and Rabbi Eliezer Altshuler concur that one does not say Modeh Ani when waking up and returning to sleep, one only says it the final time they wake up in the morning.


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Orach Chaim 132:5 Magen Avraham 6 says that one should not walk out of the Shul with his back to the Heichal.


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There's usually some unwritten rule for this. Something like: Some Aveilim are Makpid to say both Borchu's - so they always take it. Or else it's given to the unlucky fellow who didn't get to be Chazzan - since the Chazzan already said a Borchu. If there's no 2nd chiyuv then the Chazzan will say it. If a Sefardi also said Kaddish, and he's anyways going to ...


3

Your question is based on the mistaken premise that one Kohen in a Shul is not Biblically mandated to do 'Birkas Kohanim'. That isn't quite true.. What the Halacha does say is that if there is only one Kohen, then the Chazan isn't supposed to call out 'Kohanim', though if he mistakenly did (as often happens), the Kohen hasn't transgressed a Biblical Mitzva ...


4

I asked a fellow in Shul this morning this question, and he showed me a fascinating Medrash Raba. Medrash Raba Vayeira 56 third line from the top. Avaraham prayed at Mount Moriah after he was told not to sacrifice Yitzchak that Hashem should have Mercy on the Jews even if due to sin they are not deserving of it . ר' יוחנן אמר: אמר לפניו רבון העולמים ...


0

This bothered me too. Not just concerning Avraham, but by many of the situations mentioned in 'Mi Sh'ana', we never find the people mentioned actually praying or asking anything of Hashem. The answer I've told myself is based on an Or HaChaim in Shmos chapter 2 vs 23-24. The Torah tells us that the cries of the Jews from their work went up to Hashem And ...


3

There are situations in which God delays performing an action until man prays for it. See for example Bereshis 2:5 with Rashi's commentary, that God waited for Adam's prayer before causing the vegetation to sprout in the Garden of Eden. An additional example is when God decided to destroy the Jewish people, he says to Moses "Now leave me alone and my anger ...


2

Significant authorities maintain that tefillah betzibbur [=prayer with a minyan] necessitates that there be ten people actually davening [=praying] together, not just ten people present. According to these posekim, if there are six people davening who are joined by another four who have already davened, the former may recite Kaddish and Kedushah, but they ...


4

How you phrase things will depend on the age of the child, but here are some points you can cover. I'm not a parent, but I've seen parents and teachers offer all of these and remember being told some of them when I was a child. Just because you didn't see something happen doesn't mean Hashem didn't do anything. Most of what Hashem does we don't see ...


0

You should consider getting a Siddur with Kavanot. Before I used one I was around 1.5x faster than I am now. Now I take my time and I feel better after I finish. P.S. If you are Sephardic I recommend the Siddur called Kavanat Halev.


0

Chafetz Chaim - Likutei Amarim ch.11 "In summation, all the many calamities that come on us and that we are not saved from them is because we are not screaming and outpouring in prayer over them. If we would pray and would pour out before HaKadosh Baruch Hu, certainly our prayers and supplications would not return empty. And it's not enough for a ...


1

Some things that have been helpful to me personally: 1) Get enough sleep, which puts you in a better mood. 2) If you are a coffee or tea drinker, drink before davening (after the morning blessings, though). This also puts you in a better mood, as well as enhancing concentration. 3) Whenever you say a name of Hashem, slow down and say it clearly, drawing ...


3

Try to be the sheliach tzibbur as often as possible. I find that when I lead the prayers I'm much more focused on them. Partly this is because representing the congregation is a serious undertaking, so it encourages kavannah. It also helps that everyone's watching, so it's much more awkward to have a two-minute shemoneh esrei. If it's not possible to lead ...


2

Rabbi Dov Fischer (of Young Israel of Orange County) wrote a very nice article in which he discusses how adding personal prayers within the brachos of the Amidah increased his concentration and devotion. Here are some selections: "For me, that revelation – that you may add your own private prayer – was my first breakthrough. So, if someone was sick, I ...


3

One piece of advice that has helped me and more than one person that I know is to think about the meaning of the words before saying them. Generally, people intuitively gravitate towards thinking about the words afterwards and then find that they can't hold concentration. Instead thinking about the word or phrase one is about to say and then saying it can ...


5

This is from the Mishna Brurah 98:3 who quotes the Shla Hakodosh: ג) בניו הקטנים - בשל"ה קורא תגר על המביאים ילדים לבהכ"נ והיינו קטנים שעדיין לא הגיעו לחינוך מטעם כי הילדים משחקים ומרקדים בבהכ"נ ומחללים קדושת בהכ"נ וגם מבלבלים דעת המתפללים ועוד גם כי יזקינו לא יסוקו ממנהגם הרע אשר נתחנכו בילדותם להשתגע ולבזות קדושת בהכ"נ אבל כשהגיעו לחינוך אדרבה יביאנו אתו ...


3

Sam gave this source in a comment last year, but no-one ever came to post an answer, so i'll do that now... In Igrot Moshe OC 1:23, he paskens that בשעת הדחק - in an emergency, someone who is publicly Mechallel Shabbat can be counted for a minyan, to say Barchu, Kadish, and Kedusha. However, for Torah reading, it is more important to have 10 religious Jews. ...


2

Often, when someone comes to a synagogue to pray who never does otherwise, and it's not a red-letter day on the calendar, it's because he's commemorating a relative's yahrzeit that day and wants to be with a minyan to say kadish. I propose that the rabbi assumed that about you. Many have the custom of lighting a candle on a relative's yahrzeit.


2

Rebbe Nachman of Breslov has many specific teachings on prayer. He taught that one should speak to Hashem in one's own words for at least an hour each day, thanking and praising Him, doing teshuvah, asking to come close to Him, and asking for any material or spiritual things we need. Though the main emphasis in much of his writings is on praying about ...


1

You can always insert any personal supplications in the bracha of שמע קולינו. Additionally, if you want to "comment" on a specific bracha's theme, you can do so in that one as well.


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Rav Shafier (of The Shmuz) says that the best way to pray for something specific is to realize that G-d is in control of everything, and human beings are not. When a person realizes how incredibly helpless he or she is without G-d , he or she will cry out to G-d for assistance, in very simple terms, the way that a young child cries out to parents to have ...



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