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1

The opinion of the Minchat Shai (and most commentators, from what I can tell), is that a meteg on a short vowel in a closed syllable is almost always a euphonic meteg (there for stress or to stop you from swallowing a syllable, but not for the vowel quality), and thus does not affect the following shva. See also Geoffrey Khan's The Tiberian Pronunciation of ...


3

The earlier answer gives Rambam's list of what's required, but I'll address what's customarily recited, as requested. All of it. The entire p'suke d'zimra as printed in the sidur is recited by someone praying even without a minyan in my experience (though sidurim and nuschaos vary).


4

I can't necessarily say what is customary, but I will say that if you are only going to say a portion, then you should say Barukh She'Amar, skip to Ashrei and say Psalms 145-50 and Yishtabach. This is all that is required, according to the Rambam: Hilkhot Tefila 7:12 יב. ושבחו חכמים למי שקורא זמירות מספר תהלים בכל יום ויום מתהלה לדוד עד סוף ...


0

Danno's answer pretty much covers it. I would also recommend:http://www.ramaz.org/nusach/index.html, especially for good Ashkenazi davening. If you want resources for leining (reading Torah), this is a good website: http://learntrope.com/


1

Also try "Virtual Cantor": http://www.virtualcantor.com. It has .mp3 files that can be downloaded.


2

this was supposedly asked to Rav Shlomo Aviner What should a person do if he is in the middle of the Shemoneh Esrei and hears a warning siren for an incoming missile? A: He should run to the bomb shelter and continue to Daven the Shemoneh Esrei there. This is based on two factors: 1. It is a case of a life-threatening situation. 2. Walking in the middle ...


1

The source for this entire question is the Remo (based on the Mordechai and the Maharil) in Shulcahn Aruch Orach Chaim 263:5 who says: הגה: יֵשׁ מִי שֶׁאוֹמֵר שֶׁמְּבָרְכִין קֹדֶם הַהַדְלָקָה, וְיֵשׁ מִי שֶׁאוֹמֵר שֶׁמְּבָרֵךְ אַחַר הַהַדְלָקָה (מָרְדְּכַי סוֹף ב''מ), וּכְדֵי שֶׁיְּהֵא עוֹבֵר לַעֲשִׂיָּתוֹ לֹא יֵהָנֶה מִמֶּנָּה עַד לְאַחַר הַבְּרָכָה, ...


9

The source is Rabbeinu Yona Brachos 32a, in the name of the Geoinim. This is brought in Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 51:7 The Mishna Brurah there (:16) says it means to say from that posuk until the end of the chapter. Shulchan Aruch HaRav (51:8) implies that saying the single verse is enough. Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (14:2) implies that the single verse is ...


0

Matos chapter 31 sentence 4. a thousand from a tribe a thousand from a tribe. Verse 5, total of 12,000 to fight. Torah Attitude: Parashas Mattos: The Secret Army Summary G'd instructed Moses to take revenge only against the Midianites and not against the Moabites. For every thousand from the tribes of Israel that went into the army, another thousand ...


0

Medrash Rabah Parshas Matos is the source of a designated person praying for every one that went to war. שהיו נמסרות זוגות זה לזה


0

According to that same shiur they knew they would be rebuilding the beit hamikdash so there was no need to establish a prayer service. it wasn't until the destruction of the second temple where people despaired of rebuilding the temple that they needed to find a "replacement" for korbanot and instituted a set tefilla


4

I recently read an interview with a daughter of Rav Ovadia Yosef ZT"L and during the interview she mentioned that her father Rav Ovadia always held a grandchild on his lap during bentching.


5

The Rivevos Ephraim 6:410:1 brings the psak of Rav Eliyashiv that one may hold a child during bentching. In Chelek 8:572:1 he was asked to explain the psak of Rav Elyashiv how its ok since there are achronim who hold by pisukei dizimrah one cannot hold anything so certainly by a doraisa one would have to avoid such a thing. Rav Ephraim Greenblatt(Rivevos ...


1

O Ch 191 (3) MB [8] says that one may not do a melacha while saying birkas hamozon. The MB says that even a תשמיש קל (a light activity) is prohibited. If holding a child is a light activity (or more) then it would be forbidden. In O Ch 183 (12) MB [37], it says that one may not make a brocho while doing work and the MB and Shaar Hatziyun say that this ...


1

There are, in fact, a wide variety of variant forms of this passage in Shoshanas Yaakov (which is itself something of a synthesis of earlier sources). The general assumption appears to be that this passage was modified, and even removed, due to "censorship" (which can mean actual censorship by non-Jewish authorities or self-censorship to avoid provoking the ...


4

The last Mishna Berura in סימן נג [regarding "דין הראוי לירד לפני התבה"] (s'if katan פז) addresses your question. וקורין שליח-צבור חזן, שצריך לראות האיך יקרא, ותרגום "וירא" וחזי And we call the prayer-leader a חזן, because he has to see how to pray properly, and the [Aramaic] translation of "וירא" (to see) is "וחזי" (Translation mine) This ...


1

Because it changes your perspective! Praying helps you reset your internal GPS and re-think where your priorities should lie. That's why praying works - the person who finishes praying is different than the person who began praying. This new person may now deserve things which he did not deserve several moments prior. Secondly G-d wants the best for us, ...


1

you could make your question stronger by applying the same question to every mitzvah and not just davening. consider what is a need? what is a weakness? why should I care? consider, what is a need? What does it mean what the Torah talks in terms of G-d's right arm, G-d's eye, etc. We are told that we are created in G-d's image in this way human beings were ...


0

Davening is too broad/general an experience to have merely one answer to the question of why we do it. As Rambam explains (someone link it here), the sequence of Tefillah is: shevach,bakashah, and hoda'ah. At each of these various stages, we are alternately praising God and acknowledging hakaras hatov, being mekabel ol malchus shamayim and ol mitzvos, ...


0

here are some commentaries on chovos halevavos ch.3 which explain this Chovos Halevavos: "Second, the inducing by the understanding does not lead to the recognition of active obligations in the service of G-d such as prayer" Tov Halevanon commentary: Without the torah, the intellect does not understand the benefit of prayer. Because G-d will ...


1

I once heard the following explanation: The word to pray is להתפלל, which is the passive reflexive of פלל, judge. So להתפלל means to cause one's self to be judged. The purpose of prayer is to put yourself before Hashem and test how sincerely you see Him as the source of your needs. So, indeed, the prayer is not "for" Hashem, nor is it to make sure He ...


0

The simplest answer is that we pray because Hashem commanded us to. See here, #22, #23 and #24. Whatever He gets out of it is the same answer to what He gets out of any Mitzvah, and prayer isn't unique in that regard. That being said, when it comes to prayer, it intuitively feels like there should be more to it than that. Answers to that span volumes. ...


1

While the following source is not a modern Posek, it still may be of interest. R' Yehuda Hachasid writes in Sefer Chasidim (ch.158) "When you pray, add your own needs to the formula of each Bracha according to its topic, because this increases your concentration. And if you can't add on to every Bracha because the congregation finishes earlier, add on to one ...


2

As far as I'm aware, there is no well-accepted posek who would permit this. Even R. Abadi, who has many unusual opinions and allows recitation of a shorter version of Birkas Hamazon, implies in that teshuvah that one cannot arbitrarily shorten the Shemoneh Esre. While additions to anyone's personal prayers are allowed (see Shulchan Aruch O.C. 119), this is ...


1

The following is taken from the Torah Tavlin parsha sheet - Chukas 5774 The word להקדישני explains Rashi, is meant to denote Kiddush Hashem. Had Moshe spoken to the rock, as Hashem commanded, and not hit it the way he did, it would have created a great sanctification of Hashem’s name, and the people would say, “Look how the rock, which does not speak ...


4

The Aruch Hashulchan 91:6 writes in regards to clothing: ולענין בגדים: כללו של דבר שצריך להתפלל בבגדים שיוצא בהם לרחוב. ולכן בבגד בית שקורין שטו"ב חאלא"ט, אם אי אפשר לצאת בו לרחוב – אין להתפלל בו. (המגן אברהם הביא לחלק בין בתי שוקים של צמר לשל פשתן. ואצלינו אינו ידוע הפרש ביניהם.) ובוואליקע"ס בימי החורף נראה לי דיכול להתפלל, דהולכין בהם אז לרחוב. Aruch ...


2

By definition, "over-dressing" is inappropriate -- that would not fit with the first statement made in your question that one must be "dressed appropriately" when praying.


2

A source that we should pray for Moshiach's coming: Rambam Introduction to Perek Chelek, Yesod 12, Kappach translation: היסוד השנים עשר, ימות המשיח. והוא להאמין וּלְאַמֵּת שיבוא, ואין לומר שנתאחר, "אִם יִתְמַהְמָהּ חַכֵּה לוֹ" (חבקוק ב ג) ... ולהתפלל לבואו Translation of bold words - The twelfth principle is the days of the Messiah... and pray for his ...


0

It cannot be an obligation as it's not mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch nor in the Rambam.


7

Bach - Tur Orach Chaim 38 - 6 says that he saw a Maaseh Rav from a Rav Weiss Z'L who would say these 2 Parshios while he was wearing Tefilin. This would indicate to me that it is only a Minhag and not a Halacha.


0

See the Mail.Jewish post "Walking into a church", which asks whether or not one may pray in a multifaith space. And see Tzvi Stein's reply "Re: Davening in a Multi-Faith Space".


1

R' Joseph Dov Soloveitchik seems to forbid praying there. Let me elaborate. Around 1950, Cornell University planned an interfaith chapel. They decided to include stained-glass windows. Dr. Milton Konvitz wrote to R' Soloveitchik asking whether or not they could depict figures like Joshua and Jeremiah in the windows. In his reply, which was reprinted in ...



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