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1

There is a dispute in the gemara Shabbos 151b, Nidda 61b: מצות בּטלו לעתיד לבוא whether mitzvot will still be obligated in the future time of תחית המתים, resurrection of the dead. However Tosfos in Nidda prove that Mitzvos will still be binding. And theologically this is the mainstream belief. However there is a dispute if the gemara should even ...


-1

I don't recall seeing this particular issue addressed, although it may be explicit, but there is a very similar point made in Hilchos Birchas Hamazon. The Tur in Orach Chaim siman 188 and explained in the Aruch Hashulchan there addresses the issue that Birchas Hamazon is of biblical origin, and yet we find a plea for the rebuilding of Jerusalem as well as a ...


11

The Gra writes (Shenot Eliyahu to Brachot 1:1) that you have to read Shema yourself and you cannot fulfill your obligation by listening to another. (This is not universally agreed to, but see the next point.) As for the blessings, the whole point of having a Chazzan starting from (just before) Barchu is for him to recite the blessings of Keriat Shema out ...


1

Mishnah Berurah on 147:7 (22) states that the recitation of the Yehi Ratzon is only a minhag and is not mandatory. Regarding reciting it on Channukah (684:1 (1)), he says that we should not recite the Yehi Ratzon after the keriyah on Channukah. He links this to not saying the Kel Erech Apayaim before taking out the Torah. The Encyclopedia on Jewish Prayer ...


2

There is no source in the Talmud for the Western Wall being the place from where prayers "ascend". (Tractate Brachot 30a says we face toward the kodesh hakadashim when praying, traditionally and archeologically identified with the site of the Dome of the Rock.)


4

Note: 40 days of prayer at the wall is considered a "Segulah" and therefore relies more on tradition than the strict rationalist approach that the halachic process has. An Article written by Rabbi Levi Friend, author of the book "Segulos HaBaal Shem Tov" for the Torah Journal "Ohr Yisroel" (Monsey) investigated this and other 40 day "Segulos" and came up ...


4

According to Rav Yosef Shalom Elyashiv (quoted here), there is no basis at all in Judaism for this practice ("אין בזה שום עניין"). He says every prayer at the Kotel is accepted.


3

I found in this sicho of Rav Yehudah Kreuzer וכך כתב רבי יעקב עמדין זצ"ל: דע והבן, אף על פי ששכינה בכל מקום, מכל מקום אין התפילה עולה בחוץ לארץ במסילה אחת דרך ישרה, כי צריך לשולחה לארץ ישראל,ולירושלים, אל מקום בית המקדש, כנגדו שם שער השמים. And so writes Rabbi Yaakov Emden: Know and understand that although the Divine Presence is everywhere, a ...


2

Orach Chaim 423:4 is the source. Mishna Berura 10 explains that it is like Yom Tov, where Yom Tov is an Os, the same is by Rosh Chodesh when we say the special Musaf you take it off.


2

Darash Av 184 - Bamidbar page 16 quotes the Medrash Raba Breishis 43:11 which says that we were rewarded Birchas Kohanim due to the Avos. He says that is why some have the Minhag to say Bzchus Avraham Bzchus Yitzchak and Bzchus Yaakov. "מהיכן זכו ישראל לברכת כהנים? ר' יהודה אומר: מאברהם, דכתיב בפרשת לך לך : כה יהיה זרעך, וכתיב כה תברכו את בני ישראל", ...


5

The same rule applies both nights (ShA OC 422:1). (Indeed while this seems to be explicit in the Gemara (Brachot 30b), the Beit Yosef (ibid.) notes with amazement that the Orchot Chayim quotes two rabbis who disagreed and required going back on the second night.) Mishna Berura (ibid. sk 3) explains that each day of Rosh Chodesh doesn't affect the other as ...


0

One could answer by explaining his intent was an expression of his desperation. He asked God for help because he was in such a difficult position that he was forced to split his camp.


0

Prayer is the means through which the שפע comes into the world. I believe there is a medrash that says that the plants were waiting for Adam to pray before they broke out of the soil.


1

Prostration was common throughout the Biblical period and remained daily practice for many Jews into the medieval period, especially in Muslim countries. Maimonides in Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Tefila 5:13-14 discusses prostration in the context of the post-Amidah suplications/tachanun. He seems to be writing descriptively (this is what Jews do) rather than ...


2

It is very hard to set exact times for each specific part of davening. Generally minyanim will either be fixed based on a starting time (such as yeshiva minyanim) or an ending time (such as most shul minyanim where people need to be out at a certain time). I have however seen charts for vasikin minyanim where everything until the beginning of shmonah esrei ...


1

This is not a fully developed answer, so if someone could edit if they have any additional info. Shir haKavod (Anim Zemirot) is typically recited in connection with the Shir Shel Yom (henceforward: shash"y). Shash"y is relatively mobile, for example it is Minhag Anglia to recite it* before Pesukei D'zimrah (source: friends from the UK). However, in Eastern ...


3

I was taught that the reason is based on the Gemara (Ta'anis 29a & Arochin 11b): אמרו: כשחרב בית המקדש בראשונה, אותו היום ערב תשעה באב היה, ומוצאי שבת היה, ומוצאי שביעית היתה, ומשמרתה של יהויריב היתה, והלוים היו אומרים שירה ועומדין על דוכנם. ומה שירה היו אומרים? {תהילים צד-כג} וַיָּשֶׁב עֲלֵיהֶם אֶת אוֹנָם וּבְרָעָתָם יַצְמִיתֵם ולא הספיקו לומר ...


2

another source from the shaar teshuva in the chovos halevavos: Repentance is not withheld from a sinner, rather the obstruction comes from his own wickedness and deceitful heart. But if he sincerely wants to draw near to G-d, the gate of repentance will not be closed before him, and no obstacle will prevent him from reaching it. Rather, G-d will ...


4

Tosafos in Bava Metzia 58b (ד"ה חוץ) says that Teshuva/repentance works for everything (תשובה מועלת לכל דבר). However, it is important to note that teshuva will not save somebody from any punishment in beis din/court. It is also important to note that the Zohar says that teshuva does not work for the sin of spilling one's seed/הוצאת זרע לבטלה, but see the ...


5

The Interlinear Artscroll Siddur (Ashkenaz) has a footnote on those verses (page 227) that reads: The next three verses are not part of the psalm of the day, and are not recited in all congregations. They are the beginning of the next psalm and are recited because of their inspiring message that is an apt climax to the song of the day. No source ...


14

Moreshet.co.il reports: אך האריז"ל הנהיג להוסיף שלשה פסוקים ראשונים ממזמור צ"ה, "לכו נרננה" וכו', כדי לא לסיים בפורענות - "יצמיתם ה' אלקינו", כעין מה שאמרו חז"ל לגבי הפסקה בקריאת התורה: "ואין מפסיקין בקללות", וכן נוהגים בסיום הקריאה של מגילת איכה, שאחרי הפסוק האחרון "כי אם מאס מאתנו" וכו', חוזרים על הפסוק שלפניו: "השיבנו ה' אליך" וכוו, כדי לא ...


1

As per Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 6 it would seem forbidden to pray there. סעיף ו' צוֹאַת אָדָם, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁאֵין לָהּ רֵיחַ רָע, וְכֵן צוֹאַת חָתוּל וּנְמִיָּה וְצוֹאַת תַּרְנְגוֹל אֱדוֹמִי (תַּרְנְגוֹל הֹדּוּ) (אינדיק) מַרְחִיקִים מֵהֶן. וּשְׁאָר צוֹאָה שֶׁל בְּהֵמָה חַיָּה וָעוֹף, מִסְּתָמָא אֵינָהּ מַסְרַחַת וְאֵין צְרִיכִים לְהַרְחִיק מֵהֶן. אֲבָל ...


2

The wearing of a tallith messuyesseth during tefillah is very important. However, it does not prevent one from praying should the time for prayer arrive and he find himself without a tallith - whether gadhol or qatan. The Rambam in the Mishneh Thorah (Hilkhoth Tefillah 4:1ff) lists five things which prevent one from praying, even if the time for prayer has ...


1

The meditation said before putting on the Tallit godol says, ועל ידי מצות ציצית, תנצל נפשי רוחי ונשמתי ותפלתי מן החיצונים and through the mitzva of tzitzis may my soul, spirit and prayer be protected from (harmful) external influences So it seems that the tallit somehow protects the thoughts of the person praying. O Ch 24 (1) says that ...


0

Your issue is discussed by the Ramma there, and his source. He quotes the Trumas Hadeshen #16 who used the idea of kavod habrios to relinquish someone praying publicly from moving four amos away, and from saying the yehi ratzon brought in the Mechaber. What the Ramma didn't mention is that the Trumas Hadeshen specifically mentions a kol shekein for a ...


1

A sleeping person can count to make a Minyan according to most opinions (ShA OC 55:6 with commentaries). It seems from the reasons of the dissenters that even they would agree in your case to count them for a Minyan. What you would utilize such a Minyan for is a separate issue, as some things don't just need the presence of a Minyan but even the active ...


3

There is no support for slurring words and many poskim, the Mishnah Berurah among them, speak out strongly against slurring words, skipping, or mispronouncing (See the Mishnah Berurah in his opening to Hilchos Berachos and pesukei d'zimra who says that one needs to say berachos and daven as slowly as one who is extremely careful and meticulous about counting ...


0

The Ran in the gemara in Nedarim on 2a discusses what is considered a language and what is considered slang. It seems to come out that there is Hebrew which is an intrinsic language, and then there is everything else which is considered a language because it is an agreed upon communication between a people/nation; while Hebrew seems to not need the step of ...


3

While davening or learning, a person cannot be looking at something disgusting (eg. Waste). If it is behind him or to the side out of his vision, then he may make a beracha or learn as long as there is no foul odor AND he is 4 Amos (about 7 ft) away from the substance/odor. Even if the waste is in another room, you can't make a beracha with an open door or ...


0

An explicit source for not sating tachanun on Tu Bishvat before the beis Yosef is the Sefer Haminhagim (Kloizner ch. 76) who records an (obviously Ashkenazi) custom not to fast.


3

Sheilas Yaavetz 64 - column starting ונ"ל טעם discussing praying for a sick person on Shabbos, says that one should only pray for a ill person, who's illness has taken a turn for the worse לכן אין לבקש על החולה אם לא תקף עליו חליו His basis is Tircha D'Tzibura, which as you see we do not Daven 18 Brachos in Shemona Esrei on Shabbos. אלא משום טורח ...


0

There is a gemara in Brachos 45b where Rava would not tell anyone the first day he was sick, so as not to ruin his mazal, on the second day he would tell his attendant to go announce his sickness so that people who love him would pray for him and so the people who hate him would be joyous which would result in Hashem having pity on him. A win win situation. ...


2

The Halichos Shlomo on tephila has a long footnote with relevant points. It's found in chapter 8 on siff 15 footnote #56. I'll quote a few points. The discussion starts by saying if one ended the bracha of rifaeinu by saying rofei chol bassar by mistake, they have not fulfilled the obligation of that bracha. The reason given is that rophei chol bassar is ...


0

I heard that someone who calls for judgement on another, is himself subject to the force of judgement. So permitted or not, it's not a good idea. There are other ways of helping yourself feel better: try learning Torah, exercising, or posting on Mi Yodeya.


4

The Chazon Ish (Emunah UBitachon) and others hold that one can always daven for a sick person, no mater how serious his condition is and no matter how slim his chance of recovery is. The only exception would be a real miracle (not to be confused with a "medical miracle"). For example, one may not daven for someone whose arm was amputated that the arm grow ...


3

If you don't know his mother's name, you can use his father's name (Aruch Hashulchan 119:1, Orchos Rabeinu Vol 1, p 64). If you don't know his mother or father's name, you can use the surname (family name) (R' Chaim Kanievsky in Ishei Yisrael p734). If you don't know the person's proper Hebrew name, you can use an English name or a nickname that resembles ...


6

The first two are explicitly in the Talmud (Brachos 32a at the bottom), as pointed out by many commentaries on the Rambam. However, the third is often questioned, either left without a source (the Lechem Mishna) or claimed to be logical (the Maaseh Rokeah). The Or Sameach on the Rambam however finds that this is explicitly sourced in the Sifri in Zos ...


0

2 answers, based on asking people the same question: 1: Many Ashkenazi shuls do not say ברכו at the conclusion of the Weekday Shacharis prayers on Mondays and Thursdays or Rosh Chodesh. They (apparently the Talmidei haGro) borrowed the ברכו at the end of Shabbos Shacharis from the Sefardim, in case somebody came late. But on days when there is Krias ...


1

I admit that this is not a precise answer to your question but it may give you hope. The Jewish Daily Forward carried an article about AUSTIN, TEX. — A 1,200-year-old parchment Jewish prayer book that is billed as the oldest in existence was introduced Sept. 27 by a prominent private collector of Biblical artifacts. Full research on the book ...


0

I guess, it's speaking only about hashem as an ultimate king from the beginning of the times till the end.


0

I recall being told the same thing about kiddush levana, but was explained as follows: The reason we recite Aleinu after Kiddush Levana is because we want to dispel any notion that we were praying to the moon. For that purpose, the first paragraph alone suffices.


0

Mishna Berura 263:10:43 regarding a lady who lit Shabbos candles, says can not Daven Mincha any more. If there is no time then it is better for her to Daven twice Maariv. This clearly indicates that there is Tashlumin for a woman.


4

Reb Chaim Soloveitchik in his Chiddushim to the Rambam, Hilchos Tefillah 4:16, writes that there are two types of Kavana. The primary kavana is to be aware that you are standing before G-d. The second is to understand the meaning of the words.


4

The origin of the "condensed form" is a comment by Shmuel in Brochos 29a ושמואל אמר הביננו ה' אלהינו לדעת דרכיך ומול את לבבנו ליראתך ותסלח לנו להיות גאולים ורחקנו ממכאובינו ודשננו בנאות ארצך ונפוצותינו מארבע תקבץ והתועים על דעתך ישפטו ועל הרשעים תניף ידיך וישמחו צדיקים בבנין עירך ובתקון היכלך ובצמיחת קרן לדוד עבדך ובעריכת נר לבן ישי משיחך טרם נקרא ...


4

The prayer you're referring to is called Havinenu. The Rambam in Hilchot Tefilla 2:2 states that one who is rushed, or unable to concentrate, should say Havinenu. First he says the ordinary first 3, then Havinenu instead of the middle 13, and then the last 3. He thus fulfills his obligation. In halacha #4 there, he clarifies that this does not apply during ...


6

Rabbi Adin Steinsalz in his Sefer Hasidur V'Hatefila - page 38 says there are three levels in Kavana. 1 - Is to understand the meaning of the words one is saying (Orach Chaim 98:1). 2 - To identify with the words being said. 3 - Understanding the hidden meaning על דרך תורת הסוד והנסתר (literally, in the way of the instruction of the secret and the ...



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