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Ramban Shaar Gemul inyan din rosh hashana on Rosh Hashana a person's deeds are weighed and he is written and sealed for zechut (merit) or chova (the opposite) in this world according to what he deserves in this world. and when he dies, his deeds are weighed and he is judged on the portion he deserves in the world of souls. this is a partial ...


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There is a Baal Shem Tov story about him talking to the local water carrier, Haikel (sp?). First Haikel the Water Carrier discusses that his day is terrible, he must work very hard despite being old, and is not at all respected, is too poor to buy much food, etc. The next day he says things are going wonderfully, he is still able to work despite his age, ...


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Regarding the 1st bracha, Chonen Hada'at, see answers to this question. The focus and title of the question is different, but I think the answers, there, address your question. If not, please inform me. Regarding the 2nd bracha "Selach Lanu", Excerpting some ideas from this article: Nusach Eretz Yisra'el does not have the word "Chanun" at the ending. This ...


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I've heard a few Rabbis mention in their drashos that focusing on nedarim and how careful we must be with our words brings the message home how powerful our words really are. This gets us in the right frame of mind to put our words to good use in prayer for the next 25 hours.


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The previous answer does touch on the point that this was a declaration to excuse those placed in cherem (excommunication). See this comprehensive article that discusses the topic as well as how some of the ideas crossed over into the Kol Nidre paragraph that follows in the service. Much of the article has English translation. Feel free to contact me ...


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Actually, there are types of people placed in חרם, or excommunication for certain crimes, such as not listening to the orders of a בית דין, or Jewish court. This excommunication prohibits almost every type of social interaction, including praying together. However, as Yom Kippur is the day of atonement and retuning to G-d, a special exemption is made for ...


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My wife pointed out to me that the “Singer's Prayer Book” '06, 5767 edition has a “Prayer for recovery from illness”. It is slightly different to the one of the Hertz Siddur and has indeed the version: "תן בינה לרופא" and not "חֹן" .


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See pp. 159 - 160 of this book. He states that R. Isaac Luria instituted the threefold repetition.


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I think the phrase you are looking for is חֹן בינה לרופא - grant wisdom to the Doctor. You can find a prayer containing these words - with vowels - on page 1058 of the Hertz Siddur - available here. אנא יי רופא כל בשר • רחם עלי וסעדני בחסדך הגדול על ערש דוי : שלח לי תרופה ותעלה בתוך שאר חולי בניך: רפא את מכאבי וחדש כנשר נעורי: חֹן בינה לרופא ...


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there is much to gain in speaking to God often as the Alter of Kelm wrote (Sefer Zikaron Beis Kelm pg.265) (longer quote here) "A great principle in joy of the heart and health of the body, and more for the service of G-d is to search for closeness (kirva) to G-d and not closeness to human beings. Besides being a big headache in many ways, there's ...


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(a) Why have I only seen this in Sefard siddurim? It's also in the Siddur compiled by the first Chabad Rebbe. He mainly based his Siddur on the Siddur Ha-Ari from the Ari Za"l, (who was one of the foremost Kabbalists of recent history), so it's possible that it came from there, although I don't have a Siddur Ha-Ari to verify. But to answer your ...


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Laws for Jews regarding minimum clothing to pray, redding shma or say blessings ... (but it might be more respectful to G-d if you are dressed modestly at home even not praying even no one is their and it is dark) In short if you wear underwear (using your hand will not help) that covers your pubic area (and for men to cover their heads) it is enough (for ...


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The modeh ani prayer is not mentioned in the Talmud or the Rambam. It is first mentioned (as far as I can tell) in the Seder Hayom of Rabbi Moshe ben Machir who I believe was Sephardic himself. It is present in the siddur of Rabbi Eliyahu Benamozegh (Sephardic rabbi who lived in Italy in the 19th century). It is referenced by Rabbi Sassi Kohen (20th ...


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Why is this passage only printed for erev Shabbat? It's not. I mean, this passage is, but many sidurim have other passages that are said instead of various other instances of "Bar'chu", chatzi kadish, and kadish shalem.


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(a) Because only sefard says kegavna before barechu. (b) The reason is because that passage of zohar is about the moments when shabbos comes in and parallels some kabbalistic stuff to different points in the prayer service. So when there is a minyan we cut the passage short and segue into barechu, but when there isn't we might as well read the rest of the ...


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Personally, I've only seen this in Chabad's Siddur (actually might have seen it elsewhere as well come to think of it). In short, without getting into details, as far as I can tell, it is based upon the kabbalah/the teachings of the Arizal about the "Barchu" before Shabbos Maariv. Therefore, for one that is missing out on this from their davening, an ...


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This article says: The prayer probably dates from medieval times; its authorship is unknown. The hazzanim of nineteenth century Eastern Europe added drama to their recitations of the prayer by approaching the bimah from the rear of the synagogue as they chanted. A story is told of Hazzan Joseph Altshul of Slonim. His choir would stand on ...


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Yes you can. The custom among many Jews, is to say it right when you wake up. Quote from Siddur harav (loosely translated): It's good to get into the habit of saying modeh ani right when to wake up and through this you'll remember G-d who stands over you and you'll get up quickly. So if you wake up before getting dressed, then yes, you can say it before ...


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there is no such quote in the chovos halevavos. the following I believe is the closest. perhaps your quote is an interpretation of it part 8 ch.3 You should know, my brother, that our aim in prayer is only the longing of the soul to G-d, its submitting before Him, elevating its Creator, praising and thanking to His Name, and casting all of its ...


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The shul you were attending seemed to have been following the custom of the Vilna Gaon. Rabbi A Grossman has an article entitled The Vilna Gaon’s Psalms for Special Days. Some extracts: ...the Vilna Gaon was faced with a conflict. Like Maimonides, he believed that the public prayers officially ended with the reader’s full qaddish, what we call ...


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The Ben Ish Chai says the problem is the bad smell. He therefore says one is allowed to pass gas if he knows it will not smell.


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I don't think that there is any requirement to take three steps forward. ואמרי משמיה דרב מרדכי מקום שכלו ג' פסיעות שם צריך ליתן שלום. ואינו צריך לחזור למקום שהתפלל וליתן שלום "And they say in the name of Rabbi Mordecai: At the place where the three steps [back] end, there one needs to 'take leave' and does not need to return to the place he prayed and ...


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The Alshich (B'midbar 14:20) says that he heard in the name of the Sefer Livnas HaSapir that the intent of the Gemara is not that one recite the attributes, but rather to perform them ourselves.


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Loewian already cited Talmud Brachot that explains the source for citing it 3 times daily. However this Beurei Hatefilah article cites several commentaries that state that it really should be cited once daily. I don't want to occupy space here pasting an excerpt, as it's tangential to the O.P.'s question. Pnei Yehoshua on Brachot 4b says: Rabbi Eleazar ...



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