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15

Yes. The Jerusalem Talmud (Tractate Megillah) quotes Rav Imi telling his assistant that if a scholar should visit and need to sleep in the Synagogue, he should let him, and allow him to bring his donkey and other objects in as well. This opinion is codified in the Ran in Tractate Megillah. Rav Moshe Feinstein in his Responsa writes, ...


8

Two variants of Shalom Rav was found in the Cairo Geniza. Given the similarities between Cairo and Israeli nusachos, it is assumed to have been the Nusach Eretz Yisrael in the days of the tannaim and Israeli amora'im. Another indication is that Nusach Provence, the berakhah was always "Shalom Rav". The Provencial community, which was a true center of Jewish ...


8

The same people that went to shul at night on Shabbos went at night on Yom Tov. There are various reasons why there was no takana to say birchas me'ein sheva on Yom Tov. According to the Tur/Shulchan Orach in O'Ch 487, we don't say me'ein sheva on Pesach because it is Leil Shimurim, a protected night, so we don't need to worry about the dangers in siman 268....


7

The Beit Yosef (OC 46) writes (quoting Sefer Abudirham): השבוי מברך שלא עשאני עבד שלא תקנו ברכה זו מפני העבדות עצמה, אלא מפני שאין העבד חייב במצות כישראל ואינו ראוי לבא בקהל ופסול לכמה דברים.‏ One who is captured blesses "SheLo Asani Eved" for [our sages] did not enact this blessing because of the work itself, but rather because a slave is not ...


7

Your question is asked word for word by the Mishnah Berurah on Orach Chayim 132, seif katan 14: וצ"ע למה אנו אומרין אותה בשבת ויו"ט אחר מוסף והלא הקטורת קודמת למוספין לכו"ע והיא שייכא לקרבן תמיד And he gives the Magen Avraham's answer as a possibility - that we want to finish our prayer with divrei Torah, before starting out with our day: ואפשר ...


6

The proprietors of goDaven were kind enough to supply me, for the purposes of answering this question, with their table of 5,960 mincha and/or maariv services. I used a Perl script to extract 1,046 where weekday mincha both preceded maariv and was listed as a certain number of minutes before sunset, p'lag, tzes, or candle-lighting time. Because some times ...


6

The Mishna Brura 104:10 rules that a "hefsek tfila" (a pause in prayer) is only speaking and not walking. So in case of need (he speaks of danger), it is permitted to move and pick up prayer from the new location, but one should not speak. If there is no need, then one should not change his place. The poskim in Israel say clearly that in case of danger (e.g....


6

Not to disagree with anyone, but if we look to the example of Rabbi Akiva as stated explicitly in Brachot 61b, it says that he fulfilled the mitzvah of Kriat Shema by ending on the word "Echod" at the end of the first posuk only. It explains that as he was dieing during his execution, he explained to his students that he had waited all his life to fulfill ...


6

There are two answers to this question both found in Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 157 seen here. First, see the Ramma who says that the type decree which necessitates giving up one's life is only a decree leveled against jews alone, עַל יִשְׂרָאֵל לְבַדָּם, not a decree which includes other people as well, as Shach #6 there explains. And as wiki says: ...


6

Shulchan Aruch 127:2 The Rema says that we say Sim Shalom any time we have a tefilah that is fitting for the blessing of the Kohanim to be included. This is based on the end of the discussion of the Shemoneh Esrey in Talmud Megillah 18. The Amidah should end with a longer and more specific blessing of Shalom to end the tefilah. Mishnah Berurah to 127:2 (...


6

In answer to your last question: Rav Shamshon Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary on Bereishis parshas VaYera chapter 20 verse 7, poses a question, "How could Chazal have expected millions of people, 3 times a day, to all, in unison, to beseech haShem for 12 things (the middle section of the Amidah) all at once at the same time of day, 3 times a day!" He ...


6

According to R. Amnon Bazak, there is no source, and it in fact goes against tradition. Although the custom to recite "Parshat ha-Man" appears in the first siman of Shulchan Aruch, there it is a practice for every day, "in order that one should believe that his food comes with divine providence." This practice was not widely accepted. Some poskim quote a ...


6

The Raavan (cited by Avudarham at the end of Shemoneh Esrei) writes that there are two groups of 6 blessings that make up the middle section (with sh'ma koleinu being a general summary not in either group), which parallel each other. Thus, atta chonein parallels t'ka b'shofar. (See inside for explanations of the parallelism). Thus, each element of the last 6 ...


5

The shul you were attending seemed to have been following the custom of the Vilna Gaon. Rabbi A Grossman has an article entitled The Vilna Gaon’s Psalms for Special Days. Some extracts: ...the Vilna Gaon was faced with a conflict. Like Maimonides, he believed that the public prayers officially ended with the reader’s full qaddish, what we call ...


5

The previous answer does touch on the point that this was a declaration to excuse those placed in cherem (excommunication). See this comprehensive article that discusses the topic as well as how some of the ideas crossed over into the Kol Nidre paragraph that follows in the service. Much of the article has English translation. Feel free to contact me (...


5

The OP asks: "Is/was animal sacrifice the only means of seeking forgiveness?" Answer: No, animal sacrifice is not the only means in the Torah (Tanach) to seek forgiveness from G-d. Examples of other things and ideas that can be used to seek forgiveness, from Scripture: 1) A bag of flour: Leviticus 5:1-13 covers the sacrifice known as "Olah V"Yored" or a ...


5

According to Talmud (Berachot 60b), the morning blessings are each said associated with specific acts of getting up in the morning: "כי פתח עיניה לימא: "ברוך פוקח עורים"; כי תריץ ויתיב לימא: "ברוך מתיר אסורים When he opens his eyes let him say: "Blessed... Who openest the eyes of the blind." When he straightens himself and sits up let him say : "...


5

I had a similar problem; when I started taking Judaism seriously I tried to do everything. And I wasn't ready, so I stumbled through prayers I didn't comprehend, that took me forever because I was learning the language, and it was frustrating. My rabbi advised me to back off; doing less, but doing it consistently, was more important than doing everything, ...


5

Linguistically, either there is no connection, or they are closely related, depending on which root you decide is being employed. Ernest Klein's Etymological Dictionary (page 654) has 2 separate words spelled שיח. One is "speak, talk, converse" and is traced to the Arabic (was diligent) and is also spelled with a samech. The other means a shrub, traced to ...


5

Maaseh Rav 157 (a work documenting the practices of the Vilna Gaon) records the answer according to the tradition you ask about: אין אומרים שיר של יום של יומו ואומרים במקומו בב' ימים דר"ח ברכי נפשי (מזמור ק"ד) שהוא שיר של ר"ח ודוחה אפי' של שבת ופשיטא של חנוכה [On Rosh Chodesh] the Song of the Day for that day [of the week] is not said, and in its place ...


5

In general, the state of being a menstruant does not place limitations on religious obligations. My understanding was in line with this statement: " When she is niddah a woman must continue to do all of her normal religious duties, like blessings and prayers. She should continue learning even with mentioning God's name when learning the verses of the Tanakh. ...


4

One finds swaying both in the context of prayer and Torah study. Since the reasons may be connected, I will discuss both. To paraphrase On the Mainline: The first source is critical...The first source is a poem of Shemuel Ha-naggid. In this poem he is criticizing the degeneration of Torah study...As an example of their lack of orderliness he mentions their ...


4

The Salat includes the line "And I bear witness that Muhammad is [Allah's] servant and Messenger" which contradicts Jewish belief. You would not be allowed to say this line, and I think you would not be allowed to participate in the Salat in a manner that makes people think you are saying this line. I sort of think that if there were a Muslim prayer that ...


4

[I answered another question which was subsequently marked a duplicate on this one. So I am replicating my answer here] There are two issues here. One is whether our bathrooms have the status of the beit hakisei of the traditional halacha, the second whether we can say a bracha close to a beit hakisei. Whether our bathroom have the status of a beit hakisei ...


4

The Mishna Brura is basically paraphrasing the Magein Avraham there (s.v. אין לש"ץ להמתין). This seems to be within the Magein Avraham's general approach of working to justify established customs that don't follow the Psak in Shulchan Aruch. Note that the Rama's source is quoted as Binyamin Zev #168. In that Teshuva he is specifically responding to a custom ...


4

Regarding יישר כוח, i will be basing information off of the Hebrew Wikipedia article on the phrase. What is the origin of these expressions? יישר כוח comes from a line in Shabbos 87a: שנאמר (שמות לד, א) אשר שברת ואמר ר"ל יישר כחך ששיברת חזק וברוך (some also say חזק ואמץ) seems to be based on the Gemara in Brachos 32b that says that four people ...


4

יב וַיֹּאמַר | יְהֹוָה אֱלֹהֵי אֲדֹנִי אַבְרָהָם הַקְרֵה נָא לְפָנַי הַיּוֹם וַעֲשֵׂה חֶסֶד עִם אֲדֹנִי אַבְרָהָם 12 And he said, "O Lord, the God of my master Abraham, please cause to happen to me today, and perform loving kindness with my master, Abraham Rav Hirsch says that the first part of the statement is the praise of Hashem that precedes ...


4

R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary on these two verses and on Genesis 2:5, says that "שיח," in both contexts, refers to "growth." In 21:15, R' Hirsch interprets "תַּחַת אַחַד הַשִּׂיחִם" as, generically, "under something that was growing there," underlining Hagar's panicked indifference to where she dropped Yishmael, to the point of not taking note ...


4

The Amidah is divided up into 3 main sections. The first section, consisting of the first three berachot is called shevach (praise). The middle 13 berachot are called bakasha (request). The final 3 berachot are called hoda'ah (thanks). The beracha of ata kadosh is part of the shevach section (not the bakasha section), so if your definition of the word "...


4

The idea of Shabbos originated at Ma'asei Bereishis. (Creation). The Jews accepted the Shabbos 2448 years later. The Shmoneh Esrei (actually, the Amidah) of each tefillah represents a different approach to Shabbos. A. Ma'ariv refers to haShem's Creation; therefore, it starts "Atta Kidashta" this is like a heading. then we go on to say " ... Tachlis... ...



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