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32

Yes, there is a history of Jewish communities in Arab countries relying on the Muslim call to prayer for their own praying times. For one such example, here is the Ben Ish Hai, (Hacham Yosef Haim) who lived from 1832-1909 in Baghdad, and who refers to the maghrab (an Islamic prayer-time called after sunset) in various places: Ben Ish Hai, Year 1, ...


17

In Lma'an Yishme'u #267 (page 2) Rabbi Chaim Hillel Raskin says that it is a Halachic obligation to quiet or turn off a cell phone before starting to Daven. If he did not, and his cell phone rings, he is allowed to quiet or turn off the phone to ensure that no one will be disturbed further. Although he doesn't specifically address a situation where it ...


17

Many synagogues - mainly Orthodox, not specifically Hassidic, light two candles in front of the Chazzan's (cantor's) table. The candles are on during the duration of the prayers and extinguished afterwards. (Some places use electric "candles"; others use wax. I prefer the wax, though it is a bit more dangerous, smelly, and messy.) It has nothing to do with ...


14

Moreshet.co.il reports: אך האריז"ל הנהיג להוסיף שלשה פסוקים ראשונים ממזמור צ"ה, "לכו נרננה" וכו', כדי לא לסיים בפורענות - "יצמיתם ה' אלקינו", כעין מה שאמרו חז"ל לגבי הפסקה בקריאת התורה: "ואין מפסיקין בקללות", וכן נוהגים בסיום הקריאה של מגילת איכה, שאחרי הפסוק האחרון "כי אם מאס מאתנו" וכו', חוזרים על הפסוק שלפניו: "השיבנו ה' אליך" וכוו, כדי לא ...


12

In Shulchan Aruch Harav siman 582 sief 3 the Baal HaTanya writes that even if you went home and said 90 times hamelech hakadosh and then were uncertain if you did it right in davening, you still have to recite over shemoneh esrei, and he explains that this is different than mashiv haruach because when you practice saying the brochoh you can't say Hashem's ...


12

Most undertand this to be a prayer for the trait of humility; specifically as expressed by ignoring the abuse of others. This is implied by the Chovos Halevavos (Shaar Hac'nia ch. 10): והששי כי מעשה הנכנע מקובל אצל האלקים...וחשוב בו תמיד והשתדל לקנותו ופקדהו עם נפשך ומדותיך תדיר והעזר באלקים עליו ושאל אותו ממנו להתקרב אליו ולהגיע לרצונו אולי יישירך ...


11

The Gra writes (Shenot Eliyahu to Brachot 1:1) that you have to read Shema yourself and you cannot fulfill your obligation by listening to another. (This is not universally agreed to, but see the next point.) As for the blessings, the whole point of having a Chazzan starting from (just before) Barchu is for him to recite the blessings of Keriat Shema out ...


10

Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 20:1 (yonanewman.org) When the chazan steps (back) after (completing) the quiet (individual) prayers, he should stand still for the amount of time (it takes one) to walk four cubits. He returns to his place, and says quietly ''G-d, open my lips...'' , and starts aloud ''Blessed are You...'' Everyone should be careful to be quiet now, ...


9

I was a major sufferer of the problem you describe, and to be honest, I have not completely cured myself of this; however, there are a few things that I have done recently that have made a huge difference in my level of focus during davening. I think it is important to remember, though, that there is no quick fix to this challenge. As you mentioned in a ...


9

Orach Chaim 132:5 Magen Avraham 6 says that one should not walk out of the Shul with his back to the Heichal.


7

Many chasidim light candles on the yahrtzeits of important figures in chasidic history. One of the more widely-practiced ones (in the US) is to light a candle on the Yahrtzeit of R' Mendel of Riminov, which is the night after Lag Ba'omer. Chasidish shuls or shuls with lots of chasidim tend to leave out candles for people to light in the shul. I've even ...


7

Many of the people who daven at the Hillel Minyan at Northwestern University (where I davened in college) associate with the Open Orthodox movement. Most of them daven with the Koren Sacks siddur. Some others use the Artscroll Siddur edition that includes the prayers for Israel, TzaHa"L, the United States, etc. Since they use mainstream siddurim, their ...


7

Daf Al Hadaf brings this question from Kovetz Bais Hillel He brings a few answers, two of them are below. Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach answers that when Jews went to Jerusalem for Succos they were still wearing summer clothing and were unprepared for rain. However when they went for Pesach they wore winter clothing and were able to travel even in the rain. ...


7

One interpretation is that given by Tosafos (B'rachos 17a, s.v. ונפשי כעפר): ונפשי כעפר לכל תהיה. מה עפר אינו מקבל כליה לעולם כן יהי רצון שזרעי לא יכלה לעולם כמו שהוא אומר והיה זרעך כעפר הארץ Translation: "And may my soul be like dirt/dust to all": Just as the dirt can never be destroyed, so may it be Your will that my progeny is never destroyed, ...


6

Last night, i asked this question of someone who served in the war. He said that when they were in the field, there was no time for davening, and he didn't say that they said the extremely short version, so i assume they didn't. On the base for a break, they were able to daven, but not everyone was able to put on tefillin. He didn't say exactly why not; ...


6

When I was an aveil (for each of my parents), I changed my seat for the entire year. That is also the general minhag in my shul. This included Shabbosa as my new seat became my makom kavua for that year. After the year I returned to my normal seat. Our shul is somewhat "Yeshivish" on the East coast of the United States (Baltimore). I consider us somewhat to ...


6

The Kaf Hachaim siman 117 siff 3 quotes a slew of achronim (yes, Ashkenazi ones like Elya Rabba) who say not to repeat shmoneh esrei. He brings a minority opinion that one may say Shmoneh esrei again as a nidava, but he suggests against this and says to rely on the majority opinion. The seffer Shmaatsa di'Moshe in the back section called Shmuos Moshe ...


6

I witnessed the Rosh Yeshiva of Ner Israel several times pick up a sefer and learn when the Chazzan would choose a slow tune for Mimkomcha of the Shabbos Shacharis Kedusha. I don't see piyutim being any different than the sections between the primary lines of Kedusha, and certainly not any more stringent. The Rosh Yeshiva never learned or did anything ...


6

Rabbi Adin Steinsalz in his Sefer Hasidur V'Hatefila - page 38 says there are three levels in Kavana. 1 - Is to understand the meaning of the words one is saying (Orach Chaim 98:1). 2 - To identify with the words being said. 3 - Understanding the hidden meaning על דרך תורת הסוד והנסתר (literally, in the way of the instruction of the secret and the ...


6

The first two are explicitly in the Talmud (Brachos 32a at the bottom), as pointed out by many commentaries on the Rambam. However, the third is often questioned, either left without a source (the Lechem Mishna) or claimed to be logical (the Maaseh Rokeah). The Or Sameach on the Rambam however finds that this is explicitly sourced in the Sifri in Zos ...


6

Yaaleh VeYavo (literally: it should go up and come) are the first unique words of an paragraph inserted into all non-Musaf prayers (ie. Shemoneh Esrei/Amida) as well as the Grace After Meals on biblical Jewish holidays (that is, Rosh HaShana, Yom Kippur, Sukkot (all 7 days), Shemini Atzeret, Pesach (all 7 days), Shavuot, and Rosh Chodesh). You can find a ...


5

I read the following piece of advice in a pamphlet somewhere, and I tried it and it worked for me. Concentrate on the meaning of Hashem's name whenever it comes up. You can pick whichever meaning you want for it to work, although Halacha has an opinion about which one is the main one. There are two reasons why I think it works. One is that Hashem's name ...


5

I recently tried enunciating the letter ע more while davening. This makes you go slower, at least until you get so used to it. Then, once you're going slower and paying more attention to the words, you end up having better kavanah.


5

There is no support for slurring words. Many poskim, the Mishnah Berurah among them, speak out strongly against slurring words, skipping, or mispronouncing. See the Mishnah Berurah in his opening to Hilchos Berachos and Pesukei D'zimra. He says that one must say blessings and pray as slowly as one who is extremely careful and meticulous about counting his ...


5

Nusach Sfard (not to be confused with Nusach Sefaradit Or Edot HaMizrach) is the nusach (that contains many Kabbalistic inyanim) used by families and communities who ancestrally were influenced by the teachings of the Ba'al Shem Tov (founder of the Chassidus movement) and his many students. Nusach Sfard is primarily used by (Ashkenazi) people who originate ...


5

The Shulchan Arukh rules (OC 48) that one should include the verses related to the Shabbat offerings in the morning because they, unlike the verses for Rosh Chodesh and Yom Tov, are not going to be read later as Maftir. The Rama notes the Ashkenazi custom of adding the verses related to Rosh Chodesh as well in order to publicize that it is Rosh Chodesh. ...


5

This is from the Mishna Brurah 98:3 who quotes the Shla Hakodosh: ג) בניו הקטנים - בשל"ה קורא תגר על המביאים ילדים לבהכ"נ והיינו קטנים שעדיין לא הגיעו לחינוך מטעם כי הילדים משחקים ומרקדים בבהכ"נ ומחללים קדושת בהכ"נ וגם מבלבלים דעת המתפללים ועוד גם כי יזקינו לא יסוקו ממנהגם הרע אשר נתחנכו בילדותם להשתגע ולבזות קדושת בהכ"נ אבל כשהגיעו לחינוך אדרבה יביאנו אתו ...


5

First of all, as Double AA commented, לפניו is not exclusively male. In Hebrew, when referring to a group of males and females, the male form is used. That also applies when the reader is of unknown gender. The Chida (author of Birkei Yosef) wrote this several hundred years ago. In that time, it was not common for women or girls to come to shul at all. ...


5

Got this partial answer from Rabbi David Wolpe: "I have always heard that while there is no limit to personal prayers, a mi sheberach should be for four weeks unless requested longer. But I know of many that have gone longer, so there probably isn’t a prohibition." This at least answers the question about the upper bound and highlights some distinction ...


5

A source for skipping a part of U'va L'tziyon in the house of a mourner is the Avudraham. Avudraham - in Seder Tfilas H'taniyos (end of page in this linked edition) says that similar to Tisha B'Av where we skip V'Ani Zos Brisi since we can not learn Torah then, the same should be done in the house of a mourner, since the mourner is forbidden to learn Torah. ...



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