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12

In Lma'an Yishme'u #267 (page 2) Rabbi Chaim Hillel Raskin says that it is a Halachic obligation to quiet or turn off a cell phone before starting to Daven. If he did not, and his cell phone rings, he is allowed to quiet or turn off the phone to ensure that no one will be disturbed further. Although he doesn't specifically address a situation where it ...


7

First, the entire Pesukei Dezimra can be skipped (Start with Birchas Krias Shema). Because the purpose of Pesukei Dezimra is to make the Tefilah desirable to Hashem, and praying with a Minyan accomplishes this more. If there is time, add in Baruch Sheamar, the whole Ashrei*, and Yishtabach, because the Chachamim established the Pesukei DeZimra around ...


6

According to My Rav Say Elokai Neshama, Bircat HaTorah, and Bircat HaShachar Say Baruch She'Amar, Ashrei, and Yishtabach If you can put on tallit and tefillin, and say just the above passages, in the time that it takes the rest of the minyan to say all of Psukei D'Zimra, then it's better to do so, in order to pray with a minyan. This is assuming that ...


5

The text of the Selihot appears at Da`at (Herzog College) and at Wikitext. The text is nearly the same every day. There are additions for the 10 days of repentance, and there is a small section which varies based on the day of the week. There are also sections which are said in some congregations but not in others.


5

When I was an aveil (for each of my parents), I changed my seat for the entire year. That is also the general minhag in my shul. This included Shabbosa as my new seat became my makom kavua for that year. After the year I returned to my normal seat. Our shul is somewhat "Yeshivish" on the East coast of the United States (Baltimore). I consider us somewhat to ...


4

In the Siddur Shai LaMora he explains that Bina is earned through toil (as your rav explained) and then goes on to say that in the second half we are asking that despite the fact that it requires this work and effort, we are still asking for it to be given for free (as in Rashi's explination of VesChanan). So we introduce it - you give Da'at and give us the ...


3

In Kitzur Yalkut Yosef 271:13, Ovadya Yosef rules that when it comes to kiddush and havdallah, there is no need to be concerned (kpeida) about different accents. An Ashkenazi fulfills his obligation by listening to a sefardi's recitation, and vice versa.


3

I attend a Conservative shul. This past year, I noticed that 3 families of mourners all sat in different places in both the the Shabbat shul as well as the weekday chapel. As a matter of fact, the rabbi presented a se'udah shlishit shiur a few months ago explaining this minhag to everyone.


3

Chacham Ovadia in Yechave Daas 6:siman 19 pg 110 writes that we are not makpid on accent pronunciation even for davening whether one is sefard or ashkanaz. However, when it comes to parshas Zachar and parshas Parah he writes one should listen from his style of pronunciation since its a d'orasia.


3

I've come across it a few times in Shulchan Aruch Harav. For example, in siman 582, it says that if during aseres y'mei teshuvah, you said "melech ohev tzedaka umishpat" instead of "hamelech hamishpat" and you waited more than the time it takes to say "sholom olecha rabi" or you stated the next berachah, then, some say, you need to go back to beginning of ...


3

Siman 52 in Shulchan Aruch is all about the Halachos of which parts of Pesukei D'zimra to skip if one comes late to shul. From the first Mishna Berura there it is apparent that the motivation for skipping parts of Pesukei D'zimra is in deference to the value of davening Shmone Esrei together with the rest of the congregation. Being that that is the case, I ...


3

In the laws of Rosh Hashana The Mechaber mentions that even though a whole year one should not daven with a raised voice on Rosh Hashana it is permitted since people are davening from a Machzor and the noise wont disturb them. The source is PisKei Tosfos in Rosh HaShana. Not the Gemorah itself. That being said the Mishna Brura says that still one should ...


3

In truth, it's a very old מחלקת. It's mainly about the words יתגדל ויתקדש. Some מדקדקים thought that, even though we find both pata'h and tsérei occurrences for that type of word in the Torah, the normal one is with a tsérei, but in all old nuscha'os including rishonim, it's with a patach. This argument is brought by the סידור רב שלמה סופר מפרמישלה, whose ...


2

Gemara Rosh Hashana 17b עיני ה' אלהיך בה עתים לטובה עתים לרעה עתים לטובה כיצד הרי שהיו ישראל רשעים גמורין בראש השנה ופסקו להם גשמים מועטים לסוף חזרו בהן להוסיף עליהן אי אפשר שכבר נגזרה גזרה אלא הקב"ה מורידן בזמנן על הארץ הצריכה להן הכל לפי הארץ עתים לרעה כיצד הרי שהיו ישראל צדיקים גמורין בר"ה ופסקו עליהן גשמים מרובין לסוף חזרו בהן לפחות מהן אי אפשר שכבר ...


2

In Kuntres Umayon, it speaks about that on Rosh Hashana, it can be decreed, for example, that they'll be a lot of rain, and if later you're not deserving, you'll get the rain in the wrong place, or vice versa.


2

R Yitzchak Abadi writes (Or Yitzchak 65) that indeed one should not say כי אתה...צרה וצוקה when reciting Aneinu in the fourth to last Bracha of Shmoneh Esrei. If one did accidentally say it he writes that one should not continue with כי אתה שומע...‏ from the end of the regular text, but amend it to ואתה שומע...‏ and not say כי twice.


2

FWIW, there are some cases, e.g., in מודים, where even if one is not saying it one must bow along with everyone else, so as not to appear to disagree with what is being said (נראה ככופר). Source is in משנה ברורה and ערוך השלחן, both in אורח חיים, סימן ק״ט: ערוך השלחן: ...שצריך לשחות עם הציבור ב"מודים", שלא יהא נראה ככופר למי שהציבור משתחוים לו ...


2

This a touchy issue. First there is this publication by Tzeirei Chasidea Viznitz that speaks strongly against those who want to stop the practice of saying Pesukei Dezimro loud and writes that with the exception of the Amidah, davenning is to be loud and so it sweetens judgement: וחז"ל העידו בר"ה (דף ט"ז) דצעקה הוא אחד מדברים המבטלין רוע הגזירה, והפייט ...


2

The Rebbe Rashab in Kuntres Hatefila says clearly not to walk around during davening, and says that even if someone claims it helps them concentrate, they're wrong, it distracts them. I don't have an answer to part 1 of your question. ( http://meta.judaism.stackexchange.com/a/2155/6886)


2

in shulchan aruch siman reish samach beis seif beis it says ישתדל שיהיו לו בגדים נאים לשבת... you should have nice clothing for shabbos its brought in other places how yom tov is the same as shabbos however for davening there is a whole other set of halachos of how you need to be dressed (namely that you have to be "presentable") that is brought in shulchan ...


2

in shulchan aruch siman tzadik daled seif ches יש ליזהר שלא לסמוך עצמו לעמוד... בשעת תפלה you shouldn't lean yourself during davening (shmonah esrei) in mishnah berurah (on this seif) ולכן יזהר שלא יסמוך עצמו ע"ג "שטענדער" therefore you should not lean yourself on a shtender the next week seif in shulchan aruch says מי שהוכרח להתפלל מיושב צריך לחזור ולהתפלל ...


1

Rav Chaim of Volozhin (#23, quoting the Shel"ah) says that the only reason to purposefully 'shuckle' while praying is to avoid sleeping. I cannot find this in the Shel"ah, but I did find where he says: המתנועע בתפילתו גורם ביטול כוונתו, והעמידה בלא התנועעות כלל עוזר על הכוונה, ומה שאמר: 'כל עצמותי תאמרנה', היינו בשירות ותשבחות וברכות קר"ש ותלמוד תורה ...


1

I've done the following (though now I cannot recall who advised me to do so): Daven the regular Tefillah (silent Shemoneh 'Esreh) with the Minyan, and then do Tashlumin during the repetition.(Point 1) This follows from the idea that there are two requirements of Tefillah/Tzibbur - one is Tefillah BETZIBUR (praying WITH the congregation), which is fulfilled ...


1

On the one hand, davening with a Minyan is always a good thing. It is a fairly recent innovation that you can get a Minyan at all hours. In earlier times (and in some places even today) you can't really do that (even if there are enough people living there to support it). On the other hand, Tashlumin has to be specifically connected to a time of obligatory ...


1

After the Amida on Kol Nidrei night, there are a few paragraphs of Selichot that are said. The 3rd or 4th starts with the words Omnon Ken - and the Aaron HaKodesh is opened while saying it - hence "pesicha of Omnon Ken". It's on page 175 of the Interlinear ArtScroll Yom Kippour Machzor, Ashkenaz edition.


1

In siman 142 siff 1 the Ramma explaining the Michaber concerning someone who made a mistake while reading the torah says that if the mistake he made doesn't change the meaning of the word we do not make him re-read the right way. The Mishna Berurah in siff kattan 4 gives an example, such as someone who adds or leaves out a letter where the word stays the ...


1

Kol Isha -- presumably, the gemara in Megilla says that theoretically a woman could receive an aliyah. In those times, receiving an aliyah meant reading the Torah as well. Hence many rabbis (including some Orthodox ones) would say that kol isha wouldn't be a problem reading the Torah, and if that kind of singing isn't provocative, one could argue that ...


1

See tshuvas Binyan Tzion from Rav Etlenger siman 67 where he says 'even being doresh from the dead in the grave is muttar as we find the greatest amoraim doing doing so, as long as one is not doresh from the body of the deceased but rather from his spirit'. This is an idea mentioned in the Beis Yosef in Yoreh Deah siman brought in the Shach there siff ...


1

The Sefer HaIkarim 1:15 and the Avnei Eliyahu from the Gra"h on the siddur explain that "da'as" is the "מושכלות הראשונות" - the simple matters, the initial innate knowledge that a person has. This knowledge, which is similar to instinct, is given to man. Binah, on the other hand, is when someone extrapolates from that primal body of information and forms ...


1

From Rabbi Efraim Levine: In the fourth blessing of the shemona esrei prayer we recite “You graciously endow Adam with da’as and teach Enosh, binah.” In this phrase we encounter two different titles for man and two different terms for wisdom. The commentators explain the word Adam relative to Enosh connotes a positive reference to man whereas ...



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