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4

This is impossible to answer since we do not know where you daven or what kind of speed they daven at. My experience has been that in shuls that are "frummer" i.e. higher percentages of people who are serious about Torah and mitzvos, people take longer to daven, especially on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. Where I daven the silent prayer on Rosh Hashana can ...


4

One finds swaying both in the context of prayer and Torah study. Since the reasons may be connected, I will discuss both. To paraphrase On the Mainline: The first source is critical...The first source is a poem of Shemuel Ha-naggid. In this poem he is criticizing the degeneration of Torah study...As an example of their lack of orderliness he mentions their ...


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[Collected from the writings of Ha-Rav Aviner] Tachanun on Erev Yom Ha-Atzmaut It is proper to recite Tachanun at Minchah of Erev Yom Ha-Atzamaut, as the Chief Rabbinate of Israel has decreed this day "Remembrance Day for the Fallen Soldiers of Tzahal," which is a day of mourning.[1] [1]Iturei Cohanim #97, Shut She'eilat Shlomo 3:147, Sichot Ha-Rav Tzvi ...


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I heard that Rav Chaim Kanievsky holds that one should take the steps sideways or on a diagonal. I personally saw the Chazan in his shul take three steps back on a diagonal that was nearly sideways.


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This link from the OU lists synagogues that are handicapped accessible.


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Praying does not require speed - it requires Kavana - focus, concentration and meaning. I'm not sure why you should feel embarrassed in any way. Contrarily, if the majority finishes a long time before you, it could mean that they were speeding and had no or minimal kavanah. Besides, on Yom Kippur, you have an entire day to be in shul. Where are you and ...


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Actually, tipcha is a bigger break than tevir, and even bigger than revii (even though many people don't read it that way). The side of the Tikkun Simanim points out places where it makes a difference to the meaning. One major case is in Reeh 12:2. A more recent place, where it's simpler to see the meaning although I don't think the Simanim says anything ...


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According to http://www.aishdas.org/asp/shalom-rav it is partly based on Nusach Bavel vs Nusach Eretz Yisrael Two variants of Shalom Rav were found in the Cairo Geniza. Given the similarities between Cairo and Israeli nusachos, it is assumed to have been the Nusach Eretz Yisrael in the days of the tannaim and Israeli amora’im. Another indication ...



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