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5

The Maran in O Ch 111 (2) says that the Sheliach Tzibbur must repeat "Hashem Sefatai etc.," aloud in his repetition of the Amidah. MB[10] says it should be said quietly. Both agree that it has to be said. The Israel Koschitzky Virtual Beit Midrash says "Hashem Sefatai," despite being outside the textual framework of the berakhot, is not merely an ...


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The red-letter days listed in your question are, indeed, the only times we say it, and for the reason you quote: because those are the days the musaf sacrificial offerings were offered to God in the Temple back in the good old days. See Numbers chapters 28–29.


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While I am not aware that there is any authoritative list, It seems that among several that are coomonly said is Tehillim 121. I believe this was chosen as a general Tehillim to be said for people who are ill as well as people in danger, such as soldiers. The reason is because it starts with the phrase "I lift my eyes to the mountains, from where will ...


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The earlier answer gives Rambam's list of what's required, but I'll address what's customarily recited, as requested. All of it. The entire p'suke d'zimra as printed in the sidur is recited by someone praying even without a minyan in my experience (though sidurim and nuschaos vary).


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I can't necessarily say what is customary, but I will say that if you are only going to say a portion, then you should say Barukh She'Amar, skip to Ashrei and say Psalms 145-50 and Yishtabach. This is all that is required, according to the Rambam: Hilkhot Tefila 7:12 יב. ושבחו חכמים למי שקורא זמירות מספר תהלים בכל יום ויום מתהלה לדוד עד סוף ...


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Here is a link to Service of the Synagogue by the Hebrew Publishing Company. Here is a link to Yom Rishon that you can cut and paste.


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The Lubavitcher Rebbe started a campaign (in 1983 - the beginning of 5744) that everyone should say the Hareini Mekabel before davening and אך צדיקים afterwards. Rabbi Palteil speaks about the history and reasons for this here (at about the 21 minute mark). This was a previous practice, as the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch put it in his siddur to say that. The ...


3

Rabbeinu Yehuda Ben Yakar mentions that נסיך here may refer to נסיונות, that we are thanking Hashem for the challenges that He gives us every day. Etz Yosef says that these miracles are not referring to miracles that are constantly happening. It is referring to the open miracles which are always with us in our minds, meaning we always are aware of these ...


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In the Metsudah Tehillem and http://www.tehilimhotline.org/prayer_categories.asp it says which chapters should be said at which occaison, the one's pertaining to this matter would be(I think): For the Jewish People 43, 79, 80, 83 For help in troublesome times 20, 38, 85, 86, 102, 130, 142 For peace 46 For success 112 Chabad.org ...


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Based on what I've seen, Psalm 130 is also commonly recited with 121. Additionally, it would appear to me that Psalm 20 is appropriate based on its references to HaShem fighting for us.


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You are supposed to understand the words you use in prayer. In fact, if you don't understand the hebrew words, you really should be praying in the language that you do understand. So if it is the translation of parts of the Tisha Be'av prayers, which also of course include regular daily prayers, it should be permitted. The source for this that if you ...


2

The Shla (in mitzvat tefillin) wrote in the name of the Zohar (Emor) that "le-shem yichud Kudsha Brikh Hu..." should be said, as brought in the siddurim. This is agreed to by the Artzot Ha-chayim (25, Ha-me'ir La-aretz 29) and others (see, e.g., the introduction of the Shev Shematta). In contrast, the Noda Bi-yehuda wrote (OC vol. II, 107 and YD vol. I, ...


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The source of immersing before prayer or studying Torah was an enactment by Ezra for the purpose of limiting conjugal relations between a husband and wife by requiring immersion if they had a seminal emission during / after relations. The original enactment also applied to women and to involuntary emissions. It had nothing to do with ritual purity, but was ...


2

I saw at The Yeshiva World a post that included the words: One who speaks during Chazoras Hashatz causes the Shechinah to leave Klal Yisroel, and it is as if he has sinned with Avodah Zorah. Drush Chasam Sofer vol2pg309b but I didn't see it here on a quick check.


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The opinion of the Minchat Shai (and most commentators, from what I can tell), is that a meteg on a short vowel in a closed syllable is almost always a euphonic meteg (there for stress or to stop you from swallowing a syllable, but not for the vowel quality), and thus does not affect the following shva. See also Geoffrey Khan's The Tiberian Pronunciation of ...


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In answer to your fist question, R' Pinkus in the introduction to שערים בתפילה points out that you are spending, hopefully, at least an hour a day davening. If you do not appreciate what you are saying, you are wasting an hour every day. If you spend 15 minutes a day to understand what you are saying, you are really gaining 45 minutes a day. He therefore ...


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Nusach Sefard leaves out those words when saying Kiddush. Regarding Shalom Aleichem I know that Bobov leaves out that stanza.


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There are those who do not say "tzaischem" because of the idea that you do not want to sent the malachim away. One does not say to a guest as soon as they arrive "When are you leaving". SImilarly, when royalty arrives, it is an insult to ask when they plan to leave. One wants the "Queen" to stay as long as she likes. Those who say tzaischem learn in a way ...


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From torah.org: Rambam rules (as is the ruling of the Gemara; see below) that both "audible" and "careful" reading of K'riat Sh'ma are desiderata L'khat'hilah but are not indispensable. The Mishnah in Berakhot (2:3) cites the following two disputes: "If someone read K'riat Sh'ma and did not hear his own reading, (R. Yehuda says:*) Yatza, R. ...


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Danno's answer pretty much covers it. I would also recommend:http://www.ramaz.org/nusach/index.html, especially for good Ashkenazi davening. If you want resources for leining (reading Torah), this is a good website: http://learntrope.com/


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Also try "Virtual Cantor": http://www.virtualcantor.com. It has .mp3 files that can be downloaded.


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Shulchan Aruch O.C. 90:23 הבגדים המצויירים אף על פי שאינם בולטות אין נכון להתפלל כנגדם It is not proper to pray facing colorful garments, even if they do not protrude. Beis Yosef, citing Rambam, explains that the reason it is preferable to pray close to the wall is in order to not see distracting things. If these kippot have drawings or writing ...


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1 Aish says The Talmud says that the purpose of wearing a kippah is to remind us of God, who is the Higher Authority "above us" (Kiddushin 31a). 2 Halachipedia quotes the Gemoro (Shabbat 156b) to say “A Kippah or Yarmulke is a religious head covering worn to inspire fear of heaven in the mind of the one wearing it as it reminds the wearer ...



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