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12

In Shulchan Aruch Harav siman 582 sief 3 the Baal HaTanya writes that even if you went home and said 90 times hamelech hakadosh and then were uncertain if you did it right in davening, you still have to recite over shemoneh esrei, and he explains that this is different than mashiv haruach because when you practice saying the brochoh you can't say Hashem's ...


10

Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 20:1 (yonanewman.org) When the chazan steps (back) after (completing) the quiet (individual) prayers, he should stand still for the amount of time (it takes one) to walk four cubits. He returns to his place, and says quietly ''G-d, open my lips...'' , and starts aloud ''Blessed are You...'' Everyone should be careful to be quiet now, ...


10

Many synagogues - mainly Orthodox, not specifically Hassidic, light two candles in front of the Chazzan's (cantor's) table. The candles are on during the duration of the prayers and extinguished afterwards. It has nothing to do with yahrtzeit or any occasion other than praying, itself. I located the reason for this custom in this article: The Shulchan ...


6

See here: Siddur Admur [omitted in Shulchan Aruch]; Shaar Hakavanos 190; Peri Eitz Chaim Shaar R”H 7; Kaf Hachaim 582/15; M”E 582/1 and 22 The reason: The Gematria of Hashalom is the same as Safriel Hamalach which is the angel which writes the Jews in the book of life during Aseres Yimei Teshuvah. [Peri Eitz Chaim ibid brought in Kaf Hachaim ...


6

The Kaf Hachaim siman 117 siff 3 quotes a slew of achronim (yes, Ashkenazi ones like Elya Rabba) who say not to repeat shmoneh esrei. He brings a minority opinion that one may say Shmoneh esrei again as a nidava, but he suggests against this and says to rely on the majority opinion. The seffer Shmaatsa di'Moshe in the back section called Shmuos Moshe ...


5

Many chasidim light candles on the yahrtzeits of important figures in chasidic history. One of the more widely-practiced ones (in the US) is to light a candle on the Yahrtzeit of R' Mendel of Riminov, which is the night after Lag Ba'omer. Chasidish shuls or shuls with lots of chasidim tend to leave out candles for people to light in the shul. I've even ...


5

I was a major sufferer of the problem you describe, and to be honest, I have not completely cured myself of this; however, there are a few things that I have done recently that have made a huge difference in my level of focus during davening. First of all, the times when I paid the least attention to my davening were always when I was tired. When I'm barely ...


5

The Shulchan Arukh rules (OC 48) that one should include the verses related to the Shabbat offerings in the morning because they, unlike the verses for Rosh Chodesh and Yom Tov, are not going to be read later as Maftir. The Rama notes the Ashkenazi custom of adding the verses related to Rosh Chodesh as well in order to publicize that it is Rosh Chodesh. ...


5

Nusach Sfard (not to be confused with Nusach Sefaradit Or Edot HaMizrach) is the nusach (that contains many Kabbalistic inyanim) used by families and communities who ancestrally were influenced by the teachings of the Ba'al Shem Tov (founder of the Chassidus movement) and his many students. Nusach Sfard is primarily used by (Ashkenazi) people who originate ...


4

A translation of Tehilim 130 shows that it is talking about Hashem forgiving our sins, making this an appropriate chapter for this time of the year.


4

I read the following piece of advice in a pamphlet somewhere, and I tried it and it worked for me. Concentrate on the meaning of Hashem's name whenever it comes up. You can pick whichever meaning you want for it to work, although Halacha has an opinion about which one is the main one. There are two reasons why I think it works. One is that Hashem's name ...


4

I recently tried enunciating the letter ע more while davening. This makes you go slower, at least until you get so used to it. Then, once you're going slower and paying more attention to the words, you end up having better kavanah.


4

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim 624:2) states (my translation): מי שטעה בתפלת ערבית של מוצאי יום הכפורים, ואמר המלך הקדוש או המלך המשפט, לדעת רוב האחרונים, יצא ידי חובת תפלה, והנכון שיחזור ויתפלל בתנאי של נדבה One who erred during the 'Arvit prayer of Motza'ei Yom HaKippurim, and said "HaMelekh HaQadosh" or "HaMelekh HaMishpat", ...


4

I witnessed the Rosh Yeshiva of Ner Israel several times pick up a sefer and learn when the Chazzan would choose a slow tune for Mimkomcha of the Shabbos Shacharis Kedusha. I don't see piyutim being any different than the sections between the primary lines of Kedusha, and certainly not any more stringent. The Rosh Yeshiva never learned or did anything ...


4

Rav Schwab on Prayer (compiled from taped lectures under the editorship of his eldest son Rav Moses L. Schwab) Iyun Tefilla, Hebrew version of "Rav Schwab on Prayer" Rabbi Shimon Schwab was officially "retired," but his mind and conscience never rested. Always a great thinker and teacher, he turned his attention to the Siddur.


4

As for me, My Prayer by Rabbi Dr. Nissan Mindel is such a book. It doesn't have quite the academic bent that your question implies, but it does give the history of the prayers and why they are placed where they are. It does not much touch on the variety of customs in different communities.


3

First of all, the berachos upon pesukei dezimra (Yishtabach and Baruch Sheamar) cannot be made after one has said the Amidah (Shulchan Aruch 52). The question, then, is about the pesukim/mizmorim. The Shulchan Aruch there writes that one may, after finishing davening, go back to say the parts of pesukei dezimra that he skipped, and it sounds a bit like he ...


3

This OU site quotes halacha that says one need not go back and repeat.


3

The following is from Aish: After the recitation, many take special time to thank God for the many blessings of health, prosperity, and joy in their lives. There is also a special prayer composed by women, for women, which many include at this time: May it be Your will, Lord my God and God of my fathers, to be gracious to me (and to my ...


3

Rabbi Avigdor Miller was once asked a similar question, I heard the tape. 'Why do we thank Hashem for the food he gives us, when He was the one that created us with the propensity to be hungry? And the answer is because if not for being hungry you would never realize what a gracious gift you received with your wellbeing. If you never became hungry, you would ...


3

I think the paytan was working the other way. He had a list of holy 'shepherds' in who's zchus we beseach water, he filled in the stanzas with something about water concerning them all. This is very apparent from some of the forced associations. The one about Avraham is all poetic and nothing literal. Mentioning Moshe being thrown in the water seems strange. ...


3

Siddur Hagaonim Vhamikubalim - page 55 gives the following reasons regarding the end of the Amida. A: Mateh Moshe 795 - Since this is a time of judgement, and there is no judgement in charity and no charity in judgement the regular Nusach is inappropriate. However by saying Oseh HaShalom we are saying that the place of judgement is peaceful as the verse in ...


2

I recall seeing that this is impractical as the entire phrase must be said, and here that phrase is a bracha, which cannot be said multiple times. And saying it by replacing the actual sheim Hashem with the word Hashem would not count as having said the phrase in its proper form that many times.


2

Rabbeinu Yona in Berachos writes that rain is in the blessing of גבורות because it brings life to the world, like the other things mentioned in the blessing (healing, etc.). However, rain in the wrong time is a curse and causes rotting. Thus it was used as a punishment in Sefer Shmuel for asking for a King. So rain in the wrong time would not be relevant ...


2

I once heard, but I don't recall where, that there is another possible reason to say it even if you didn't have a bad dream - part of the Ribbono Shel Olam mentions dreams that others have had about you, which you will most likely not be aware of.


2

Nefesh HaChaim Shaar Beis Ch. 2: ומה שמושג אצלינו קצת ואנו מכנים ומתארים כמה תארים ושמות וכנויים ומדות. כמו שמצינום בתורה ובכל מטבע התפלה. כולם הם רק מצד התחברותו יתברך אל העולמות והכחות מעת הבריאה. להעמידים ולהחיותם ולהנהיגם כרצונו ית"ש. (והם אשר קראום בשם השתלשלות הספירות). ולפי כל שנויי פרטי סדרי ההנהגה שמשתלשל ונמשך לזה העולם אם לדין. אם לחסד. אם ...


2

There is another reason for a woman to close her eyes at the lighting of the candles for Shabbos. Technically, she should first say the bracha and then light the candles. However, once she has said the bracha, she has accepted Shabbos and is forbidden to light the candles. Thus, she lights the candle, put the match or lighting device away, closes her eyes, ...


1

During candle lighting she should be thinking about fulfilling the Mitzva of honouring the Shabbat by creating a brighter room. After she has extinguished the match, covered her eyes, made the Bracha and then looked at the candles and accepted Shabbat, she may want to use this auspicious time to pray for whatever she feels needs to be prayed for. The ...


1

I read from an old book by Rabbi Louis Isaac Rabinowitz that it parallels a person's trip to the temple in Jerusalem. there's more but from from what I remember: Yaale - he goes up the steps. veyavo -he comes towards the kohen veyagia - he gets there veyerae - he appears before G-d veyeratze - his sacrifice is accepted favorably he goes on there, if ...


1

FWIW, I can give you an idea that I developed with a friend of mine. I don't have an actual source, though this idea is based (however loosely) on the Ramban. In short: Ya'aleh Veyavo is a prayer asking for God to judge us favorably, which is appropriate for the holidays and Rosh Chodesh because they are all mini-judgement days. By referring to Rosh ...



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