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The following material is taken from hasofer.com and may answer most of your questions. What you are referring to as "Gassos Prudos" sounds like thick skins that are not from a single skin but are glued together. This would be by definition, less mehudar. Minimally kosher or mehudar? It's your choice! Jewish law recognizes 4 levels of kashrut. An ...


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These different terms describing tefillin are not all on the same "plane" so to speak. In other words, they describe different aspects of the tefillin. In one plane is the spectrum of peshutim, dakot, gasot. These words describe the batim (leather boxes) of the tefillin. Tefillin peshutim are the lowest quality and least expensive. They are composed of ...


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Tefillin are divided into different categories based on the quality of the leather boxes Tfilin crafted from two separate pieces of leather (which are then glued together) are known as tfilin peshutim, the simplest tfilin. Hasofer says they generally last only three to five years, after which the pieces begin to separate and they lose their required square ...


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An experienced sofer stam (scribe) or batim macher (maker of tfilin boxes) will often look at them and tell you in three seconds, out of experience dealing with hundreds of tfilin over their life. The main difference between gassot, dakot and pshutim is the type and thickness of leather. This is difficult for a non-professional to assess. However, very ...


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You can always retie the knots but the result won't be the same as Nusach Ashkenaz tefilin. Many years ago I purchased Nusach Ari tefilin, after being told that ktav Ari was accepted by both Ashkenazim (Litaim) and Hassidim. Once I learned hilchot tfilin in more depth I discovered that there were other important differences between Ari and Ashkenazi ...


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The Teshuvos VeHanhagos mentions a few: Some communities in Israel (now and during the time of the Reishis Chochma) R' Velvel Brisker The Rama MiPano


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In order to possibly find a specific answer to your question, it requires understanding what the source for the different behavior is between Askenazic and Sephardic minhag. And excellent and brief discussion of this is provided by Rabbi David Sperling on Yeshiva.org. Question: Why do Sephardi Jews sit when reciting the bracha for tefillin? ...


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The half at the brginning and the half at the end are such that the part that is on the arm at the top is opposite the part that is not on the arm at the bottom and vice versa. Thus only seven wrapping are actually seen on that arm at any one time. This is from inspection of my arm at Shacharis.


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This is a good question and worth looking at carefully. Devarim 11:13-17 is addressing the subject of reward and punishment. Verse 11:18 begins as you say but is not talking about tefillin. The 'heart' is spelled with a double 'bet' (לבבך), as contrasted with a single 'bet'. (לבך) שַׂמְתֶּם אֶת דְּבָרַי אֵלֶּה עַל לְבַבְכֶם וְעַל נַפְשְׁכֶם וּקְשַׁרְתֶּם ...


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We put the תפילין של יד slanted slightly on our left arm (if you're right handed) leaning in towards our heart. I've always been taught that in this manner the תפילין של יד is fulfilling that aspect. I assume one of the reasons is that the תפילין must directly contact our skin and putting another box on our chest would prove...problematic, if you know what I ...


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Unfortunately I do not have the time to check each source specifically, but here are a few pointers: Rabbi Shalom Jerby from Nofit in Israel says that Sephardic communities in many places stand, including Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and more. Rabbi Ovadia Yosef says that even though lechatchila one should stand, there's a sod to sitting, and he brings a few ...


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For what it's worth, I once asked my rabbi whether I should wear tefillin on Chol HaMoed. His opinion was that those who do not don tefillin on Chol HaMoed are doing the wrong thing, though they should be put on without a berakha. He mentioned that if I would be davening in a place where nobody puts on tefillin (like most minyanim in Israel, as many of the ...


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With certain limitations it is permissible. Here is a great link to a brochure on tefillin use from Rav Shimon Eider of Lakewood. He discusses borrowed tefillin on page 43. ...


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Shulchan Aruch O.C. 14:4 states that one may borrow someone's tallit without permission. Rema adds that this rule applies to tefillin, as well. However, this article states that this assumes a few factors, most notably that the borrowing is occasional and the borrower has no reason to suspect that the owner may object to his borrowing his tefillin. In the ...


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One orthodox adjudicators' view The Ben ish chai in chukay noshim chapter 43 (below) says woman can do all time bound mitsvot exept tefilin and tissis In his shut Rav poalim part 1(end), soid ishorim 12 he gives a kabolistik source/explanation for them not having permission to do them.



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