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11

The Talmud (in Masekhet Shabbat 120b) directly discusses this issue: דתניא: הרי שהיה שם כתוב לו על בשרו - הרי זה לא ירחוץ ולא יסוך ולא יעמוד במקום הטינופת. נזדמנה לו טבילה של מצוה - כורך עליה גמי ויורד וטובל. רבי יוסי אומר: לעולם יורד וטובל כדרכו, ובלבד שלא ישפשף As it was taught in a baraita: If one had a sacred name of God written on his skin he ...


11

See this Chabad.org article. In short, the answer is yes. While getting a tattoo is forbidden, once one has one there is no law that he/she cannot be buried in a Jewish cemetery. However, every Jewish burial society has the right to enact their own rules...


10

UPDATE: Shalom pointed to the article "Medical and Cosmetic Tattooing" by J. David Bleich (Tradition 42:4), in which a pseudo-Kabbalist directed a woman to get a tattoo containing the Divine Name. The question of removing it was brought to Sephardic Chief Rabbi Eliyahu Bakshi-Doron and printed in Or ha-Torah Shevat 5762. R. Bleich's summarizes R. ...


9

In this answer, Rabbi Moshe Leib Halberstadt concludes that: in a case of temporary henna tattoos which are placed on top of the skin and do not last for more than a few weeks, there is no prohibition, neither from the Torah nor from rabbinic law. Because even according to the Minchat Chinuch that rabbinically prohibits external writing on the body even ...


6

On the Beit El Yeshiva Center site (originally posted by jake, and used by yydl in his answer), someone asks about: a new tattoo ink called freedom-2 that is permanent, but when you want to remove it, there is a formula that breaks it down and the body absorbs it." Rabbi Yitzchak Grinblat says: Halachikly even this tattoo is Asur because of Marit ...


6

According to this article by Rabbi Dr. Ari Zivotofsky there is no requirement to remove a tattoo, although it could be considered a pious act to do so, especially if the tattoo depicts something immoral and idolatrous. He discusses four ways of removing a tattoo, two of which are permissible, and two of which are questionable. Removal via a cream or laser ...


5

While there is a commandment for a Jew to not get a tatoo, Leviticus 19:28, B.T. Makkot 21a there is, however, a separate Torah prohibition - "Lo Yosif" - not to inflict a wound upon yourself, Deuteronomy 25:3. According to many poskim, removing a tattoo involves "wounding" yourself. Therefore, it is generally prohibited to a Jew to inflict pain upon ...


4

It's one thing to break laws; it's another to explicitly acknowledge the lawgiver in the process of doing so. One would generally only do so if one intended to offend, so if there are those who take offense one can hardly be surprised. Even if in your particular case it was done in ignorance, people tend not to assume that. Which is understandable, weighing ...


4

According to this article, Rav Eliyahu Bakshi-Doron (Techumin 22:387) viewed the removal of a tattoo as a meritorious act to avoid remembering a previous sinful life. However, Dayan Weisz (Teshuvot Minchat Yitzchak 3:11) does not (seem to) agree that this is necessary. (This is aside from the opinion of Rav Ephraim Oshry (Teshuvot Mee’ma’makim 4:22) that ...


4

According to this article: "Rav Eliyahu Bakshi-Doron (Techumin 22:387)...recommends removing the tattoo to avoid the constant reminder of an earlier sin. He even permits, in certain circumstances, the removal of Hashem’s name that was [sinfully] tattooed on one’s body, even though it is ordinarily forbidden to erase Hashem’s name."


3

I've met converts who had pre-conversion tattoos. It makes sense to me that a convert would not be held liable for torah transgressions that predated him being bound by the torah; after all, we also don't reject converts who used to eat pork or work on Shabbat or have relationships not in accordance with torah, assuming they no longer do these things. As a ...


3

no convert is turned away because of their tattoos. Is common for converts to cover their tattoos at all time while in public.tattoo removal encourage more damage to the body in the actual tattoo in process itself body can


3

Mishnah Makkos 3:6 and Gemara 21a; Yerushalmi Makkos 3:6 Rambam (Avodat Kochavim 12:11) and Shulchan Aruch (YD180:1; Shach 180:1) both rule that one has only done an aveira if one both pierces the skin and adds colour.


3

Gesher Hachayim, volume 1, chapter 25, paragraphs 1–2 says: A renowned [word I don't recognize] who has separated himself from the ways of Jewry and who has removed from himself the entire yoke of the law of the Jews: there's no avelus (mourning) for him... but one must bury him and work toward his burial and with dressing him therefor.... But ...


2

This is a very old (and can also be a very hurtful) Jewish urban legend. See this New York Times article where the author tried to determine the origins of this legend. Why it's gained so much currency in the modern age is beyond me. Frankly the chabad.org article quoted elsewhere, while factually correct, emphasizes the wrong things. The bottom line is that ...


2

People who violate the Torah have the same burial rights as others unless they are continuous violators who have refused to do Teshuva even on their death bed. (Shach YD 345:5 and Shulchan Aruch/Rema 340:5) So the question may be: Is a person in continuous violation for having a tattoo, or only for putting one on? Also in play, can the tattoo be easily ...


1

I agree, no need to tell the head doctor. It's the assistant who's actually lasering it off. The head doctor is just arranging for paperwork, and what's more; if he wasn't around, someone else would do it. Jews are prohibited from enabling others to sin, and discouraged from assisting others to sin; they are not, however, prohibited from enabling enablers, ...


1

This answer states that permanent makeup is allowed. He bases it mainly on the fact tattooing is forbidden when two actions are involved - writing (ink filling) and scratching/cutting into the skin. However, he adds a few more things into the discussion, one is that the outcome is just some color, not a distinguishable shape. Another - that it's not really ...


1

The Mishna (Shabbat 12:4) discusses the prohibition of writing on Shabbat. In that context, it says the following: הכותב על בשרו - חיב. המסרט על בשרו - רבי אליעזר מחיב חטאת ורבי יהושע פוטר One who writes upon his skin is obligated [to bring a sin offering]. Concerning one who engraves his skin, Rabbi Eliezer obligates him to bring a sin ...



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