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1

If it is forbidden to speak God's name in vain, and it is forbidden to desecrate God's name in the writing of any language (MB 85:10), then it seems obvious that it is forbidden to irreverently sign God in conversation. The simple idea is about the respect we give in referring to our Creator. Nevertheless, if you wanted to look down the pilpul glass, then ...


4

this isn't a religious implication, but it could probably serve as document to help prove Jewish lineage if you were to ever consider Israeli citizenship (Aliyah). And maybe if you were looking for a Jewish name for a child, you might consider one of these names, or a variation in English, as is traditional to name a child after one of the ancestors. Names ...


12

The religious implication of this ketubah is that it may be possible to use it to establish, in a Jewish court, certain facts about the listed bride and groom: That they were Jewish. On this basis, their children would also be Jewish, as would any children of their daughters, of their daughters' daughters, etc. That the man was a Levi. On this basis, he, ...


32

As Danny Schoemann says, it's a ketubah. A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. The text in this form matches the standard text presented and translated on this Chabad.org page. People Groom: Yehuda Leib, son of Avraham Noah. He is also a Levi Bride: Toiba Rachel, daughter of Yisrael Arye Witness: Aharon Leib, son of Moshe the Levi Witness: Abba David, ...


3

The Maharsha on your Gemara states that he believes Yonatan ben Uziel did not translate the Torah. אלא שלא היה יונתן חש לפרש התורה אז מטעמא דלקמן דמפרש' מלתא ולא היה מפרש רק נביאים דאיכא מילי דמסתמן עד שבא אונקלוס ופירש לדורו גם התורה The Chida (שם הגדולים: תרגומים, pg 33-34 here) discusses the question of the origin of Targum Yonatan, bringing ...



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