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1

The Siddur Shay LaMora quotes the Olas Tamid according to Rashi's first explination to Tehillim 16:5 that it means all good that I have comes from Him.


3

I have looked into this a little in the past, so I can't recall particular sources, but the gist of it is as follows: Some wish to translate it as in "חבל נחלתו" and many other instances in which it is used to mean "my lot" or "my portion in life". This would parallel the other phrase "מנת כוסי" in the next line. "צור חבלי" would then mean "the Rock who is ...


4

The Kehot Annotated Siddur translates it as "the strength of my lot in times of distress". The "my lot" would be like Devarim 32:9: יַעֲקֹב, חֶבֶל נַחֲלָתוֹ Jacob the lot of His inheritance The Siddur Shay Lamorah quotes Iyun Tefilah that it means that He is my Rock and Refuge (מעוז) to save me from the pains which grab me at a time of trouble. ...


4

A possible interpretation can be gleaned from the posuk in Yechezkel 27:8 where the term rope is used metaphorically to signify the ones steering the ship. And in Shmuel II 8:2 ropes are used metaphorically to signify control over life and death. Thus in keeping with the theme of the piyut that Hashem is “Master of the world”, we praise Hashem by ...


1

I noticed that the root form of חֶבלִי is חבל meaning "rope". However, I also did a Google translate on the full word חֶבלִי and it displayed the synonym נָחוּת which has one translation as "disadvantaged". This makes sense, in this context, as the word "chaval" is often said to someone when a tragedy or danger is mentioned. See also this site which gives a ...


4

I'm just going to assume that when you say "authoritative", you mean "valid interpretations of Rabbinic Judaism", and not that it was given to Moshe at Har Sinai or something like that. From my own experiences, I think that the "average" Orthodox Rabbi probably isn't aware of the Targum Neofiti or of its history, and is thus likely to dismiss it out of ...


3

As Noach mi Frankfurt said in a comment, there are four English translations: Soncino, Neusner, Artscroll, and Koren/Steinsaltz. I've worked with three of them (I don't know Neusner), and for a beginner I recommend the last, accompanied by a study partner or, at the very least, an introduction to talmud. None of these translations are particularly aimed ...



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