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32

As Danny Schoemann says, it's a ketubah. A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. The text in this form matches the standard text presented and translated on this Chabad.org page. People Groom: Yehuda Leib, son of Avraham Noah. He is also a Levi Bride: Toiba Rachel, daughter of Yisrael Arye Witness: Aharon Leib, son of Moshe the Levi Witness: Abba David, ...


15

There's no sin in translating Jewish texts (nowadays, at least). I have no source for saying so, but there's evidence in the vast amount of Jewish literature that has been translated into various languages. However: People sometimes can't be bothered to translate, especially because of the remaining reasons (below). Some words are very hard to translate ...


12

The religious implication of this ketubah is that it may be possible to use it to establish, in a Jewish court, certain facts about the listed bride and groom: That they were Jewish. On this basis, their children would also be Jewish, as would any children of their daughters, of their daughters' daughters, etc. That the man was a Levi. On this basis, he, ...


7

It literally means "that I am afraid." "לולא דמסתפינא"--"were it not that I am afraid" is a common rabbinic phrase typically signaling a novel interpretation which the author is not confident enough in to overturn precedent with. The root is "ספי," meaning "fear." The suffix "נא" with the prefix "דמ" means "that I am." "ת" is because the construction is ...


6

As mentioned above, there aren't any general prohibitions (per se) on translating Jewish texts into the vernacular, be it English, French, Russian, Yiddish, etc. Regarding Text on This Site Many posts and answers here are among those for whom Hebrew is not a foreign language. Many of this site's users know each other (at least virtually) and are aware of ...


5

The bottom of the pot: the word שול denotes the bottom part of a vessel, garment or animal. So, for example, the skirts of a robe or the bottom-most rim of a cauldron. You can see Jastrow (s.v. שול) for examples. In this instance, the Mishna Berurah is speaking of a pot that is placed in such a fashion that the bottom part of it is coming into contact with ...


5

Actually, the standard English translations of all of the books you mentioned were done from the Arabic, not from a Hebrew intermediary: Rosenblatt's Book of Beliefs and Opinions, Pines' Guide of the Perplexed, Mansoor's Book of Direction to the Duties of the Heart.


5

The general scholarly answer is, "We don't really know." On linguistic grounds (i.e. an analysis of its language of Late Literary Jewish Aramaic) it is usually considered a "late" targum, i.e. having been composed between the fourth and sixth centuries CE, and some even push it as late as the seventh to ninth centuries CE. We certainly know nothing of the ...


4

Sefaria.org has the complete Ramban on the Torah online for free in Hebrew, with a small minority of sections so far community-translated into English: Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Deuteronomy They have a channel for submitting requests for translation of specific sections, and the requests are put on a queue for community translation.


4

The names of nefesh, ruach, neshamah, yechidah, chayah (in that order) is from Bereishis Rabba 14:11. I wish to add two more positions to the discussion. The first is Rav Saadia Gaon's (Emunos veDeios 6:3). Rav Saadia Gaon was an Aristotilian rationalist, although to a lesser extent than the Rambam, who had to deal with the topic when writing a commentary ...


4

this isn't a religious implication, but it could probably serve as document to help prove Jewish lineage if you were to ever consider Israeli citizenship (Aliyah). And maybe if you were looking for a Jewish name for a child, you might consider one of these names, or a variation in English, as is traditional to name a child after one of the ancestors. Names ...


4

In 17:19, Chabad.org does translate it as "Indeed", however that does not change the context or meaning of the statement. Art Scroll uses "Nonetheless" as the translation which has the same implication as Chabad.org. יט וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים אֲבָל שָׂרָה אִשְׁתְּךָ יֹלֶדֶת לְךָ בֵּן וְקָרָאתָ אֶת שְׁמוֹ יִצְחָק וַהֲקִמֹתִי אֶת בְּרִיתִי אִתּוֹ לִבְרִית ...


4

You can get it all online here or buy this ArtScroll set. You can also go old school and get the JPS set (that's the link for Devarim).


4

There are different opinions regarding the nature of the rakia. One opinion is that of R. Avraham Ibn Ezra who writes in his commentary to Genesis (1:6) (Shitta acheret) as follows: והנכון בעיני, כי הארץ היתה מכוסה במים, והרוח יבש המים מעל הארץ כדרך ויעבר א-להים רוח על הארץ וישכו המים (ברא' ח, א) אז נראה. ובעבור האור היה הרקיע. והוא האויר ההוה על הארץ ...


4

That is not the early Israelite understanding of cosmology, it is Babylonian cosmology. Tannaim (eg R' Eliezer on Bava Basra 25a) and the earlier Babylonian amoraim mapped the Torah to it, much the way rabbis today talk about Relativity and QM in the Torah. The Babylonians and Persians had much much more accurate observations than the Greeks, so this was ...


3

While the Hebrew language is indeed considered Holy, it is not the reason most things are not translated on this site. In my opinion, it has to do with the assumptions of the writer. Assumptions Possible Assumption #1: That if you are asking a very specific questions, then you must be knowledgeable enough to read or translate for yourself the specific ...


3

It means who didn't explain it, why we eat all those things, so saying just the words wouldn't be sufficient either, so sign language is just fine. שולחן ערוך אורח חיים תעג סעיף ו הגה: ויאמר בלשון שמבינים הנשים והקטנים או יפרש להם הענין וכן עשה ר"י מלונדרי כל ההגדה בלשון לע"ז כדי שיבינו הנשים והקטנים Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 473:6 Note: And he should ...


3

It's called המתרגם. The reason it's hard to find is because it is not consistently printed in the same place in all masechtos. Check before and after the Maharsha, that's usually where the printers found place to squeeze it in. The standard Vilna 'Shaar Blaat' mentions it's collation at the bottom of side two in the section ומלבד כל אלו הוספנו by number 15, ...


3

Good question. See here and here for more. The most common name in the Jewish Bible for God is spelled in Hebrew letters that would roughly correspond with YHVH in English (Hebrew doesn't always use vowels); this is known as the "Tetragrammaton", i.e. the four-letter name of God. Jews don't pronounce that as written, instead they pronounce it "Adonai", ...


3

Targum Yonatan, the chief traditional translator of the books of the Prophets, translates this phrase into Aramaic as "גְבַר עָבֵיד רְעוּתֵהּ", which means "a man who does His will." So, "a man after His own heart" would be a reasonable colloquial and literal translation, and indeed is the one chosen by the JPS 1917 translation that was linked into the ...


3

The Maharsha on your Gemara states that he believes Yonatan ben Uziel did not translate the Torah. אלא שלא היה יונתן חש לפרש התורה אז מטעמא דלקמן דמפרש' מלתא ולא היה מפרש רק נביאים דאיכא מילי דמסתמן עד שבא אונקלוס ופירש לדורו גם התורה The Chida (שם הגדולים: תרגומים, pg 33-34 here) discusses the question of the origin of Targum Yonatan, bringing ...


3

From http://parsha.blogspot.com/2010/07/what-is-tzirah.html: Onkelos translates it as ערעיתא, hornet. Ibn Ezra understands it as a type of sickness of the body, along the lines of צרעת. So does Ibn Janach, that it is כליון ודבר


3

Any Jewish book store near where you live or online. Judaica World, Judaica Press, Koren, ArtScroll, World of Judaica, Eichlers, and even Amazon will have this. You can even go online and find it for free at ... http://www.chabad.org/library/bible_cdo/aid/63255/jewish/The-Bible-with-Rashi.htm


3

Rabbi Eliyahu Munk, in his book עולם התפילות, gives several reasons for this (which we say every day, not only on Shabbat): This is the end of the teffilah, after we already reached the hights during Shma Yisrael and Amida, and we are slowly descending and equipping ourselves towards our day. Therefore we need the explanation of the targum for example that ...


2

The Rambam's responsum to Yoseph ben Gabir you're looking for begins on the 177th page of Qovetz Teshuvot ha-Rambam ve-Igrotav (Leipzig 1859). It's also available on Sefaria.


2

The word ברומא in the Targum to this pasuk means 'on high'. As you write, Jastrow gives a few possibilities of translating that Aramaic word רומא, in the general case. It could mean "at a height", "haughty", or "Rome". The etymology for the first two comes from the root רום, in both Biblical Hebrew and in Aramaic. The etymology for the third is unrelated ...


2

Try Fugue? Fugue: a state or period of loss of awareness of one's identity, often coupled with flight from one's usual environment, associated with certain forms of hysteria and epilepsy. Wikipedia Article


2

Sefaria's is incomplete, but it does start with the first chapter as requested.


2

The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon defines it (referencing that pasuk in Yeshayahu) as "shining one, epithet of king of Babylon" and notes that it refers to "star of the morning" I.e. Venus. The Hebrew ultimately comes from the same 3 letter root as הלל (halal) [the root being ה.ל.ל.] translated as "to shine". הילל is the noun related to ...


2

Commentaries on the verse (in no particular order, Malbim, Yonasan, M'tzudos, ibn Ezra, Rashi, Ri Kara, Radak) say it's a כוכב, that is a shining star or planet. (They're not clear, though, on whether the word means "כוכב" or, on the other hand, is the name of a כוכב.)



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