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15

In British English, "corn" can mean any grain, not just maize (the plant native to America). See Merriam-Webster; Wiktionary.


8

My sister made this chart. It is kind of a condensed version of the hebrew one: And here's a version with the titles transliterated, instead of translated:


7

Asked and answered here. it seems quite likely that this is a later interpolation; it doesn't appear in early prints of Rashi. In several places, though, Rashi refers to לשון כנען, which was a popular term at the time for the Slavic languages (based on the equation of "Slav" with "slave" and the association of the latter with Canaan). These ...


7

To add a little bit: This sentence (in Hebrew: ותשובה ותפלה וצדקה מעבירין את רוע הגזרה, uteshuva utefila utzedaqa ma'avirin et roa' hagezeira) is from the well-known piyyut (liturgical poem) Unetaneh Tokef, which is recited during the High Holidays. It is attributed (probably apocryphally) to a certain 11th-century rabbi, Amnon of Mainz but is probably a ...


7

See Mishne Berurah 285:3 that even names like Reuvain and Shimon are read שנים מקרא ואחד תרגום. This is based on the Gemara Berachos 8 that even "Ataros veDivon" (city names) whose Targum does not add anything are included in the mitzva of שנים מקרא ואחד תרגום. The parshios hanesiim clearly have the same halacha and are read in Targum.


5

I just ran across this translation from Mechon Hadar: מנהגא מילתא היא - custom has significant weight Edit The following phrase appears three times in the Talmud Yerushalmi: ולא דבר הלכה זו. אלא כל הלכה שהיא רופפת בבית דין ואין את יודע מה טיבה צא וראה היאך הציבור נוהג ונהוג. And this is not a halachic decision. Instead, any halachic ...


5

I learned the Arabic version of Echad Mi Yodeya, the refrain of which is allah hu wahid. Upon singing it someone questioned whether or not it was permissible to say that refrain. They consulted Rabbi Yisroel Miller (of Calgary, Alberta) who said that it was not considered either the use of the name of an idol, or a holy name, and was akin to the English word ...


4

It literally means "a joyful Purim". The words "I wish you" that should accompany it are missing but if you want to say it in proper English then "I wish you a joyful Purim" would do the job. Google Translate has "A happy Purim". Maybe you need to cast lots to decide which to use. (Purim means "lots").


4

I'm just going to assume that when you say "authoritative", you mean "valid interpretations of Rabbinic Judaism", and not that it was given to Moshe at Har Sinai or something like that. From my own experiences, I think that the "average" Orthodox Rabbi probably isn't aware of the Targum Neofiti or of its history, and is thus likely to dismiss it out of ...


4

The Kehot Annotated Siddur translates it as "the strength of my lot in times of distress". The "my lot" would be like Devarim 32:9: יַעֲקֹב, חֶבֶל נַחֲלָתוֹ Jacob the lot of His inheritance The Siddur Shay Lamorah quotes Iyun Tefilah that it means that He is my Rock and Refuge (מעוז) to save me from the pains which grab me at a time of trouble. ...


3

Tol'dos Yitzchak (by Rabbi Yitzchak Karo, uncle of the Bes Yosef) has two explanations: "to tell you whoever sees a sota in her detriment…": its explanation is as a way of a command: he's obliged to swear off of wine, in his seeing her death due to the drinking of wine…. And it is also natural: … "whoever sees a sota in her ...


3

On a logical basis, the repetition of the pesukim is in and of itself necessary and teaches a lesson. Thus, it would appear that in order to fulfill שנים מקרא אחד תרגום one would have to do the targum for each pasuk as one does the mikre. If one were to be able to skip the targum then one would be able to skip the mikre. Another example could be Vayedaber ...


3

I hereby nullify any expression of intent or condition or disclaimer, and disclaimers that result from my disclaimers (lit. that come out from within) ad infinatum, and invalidate any witnesses of my disclaimer against the vow that I am about to make. It is a declaration discounting any attempt to invalidate a vow, in order to make the vow absolutely ...


3

http://www.sefaria.org/Berakhot.2a hope this is helpful to you regards


3

As Noach mi Frankfurt said in a comment, there are four English translations: Soncino, Neusner, Artscroll, and Koren/Steinsaltz. I've worked with three of them (I don't know Neusner), and for a beginner I recommend the last, accompanied by a study partner or, at the very least, an introduction to talmud. None of these translations are particularly aimed ...


3

I have looked into this a little in the past, so I can't recall particular sources, but the gist of it is as follows: Some wish to translate it as in "חבל נחלתו" and many other instances in which it is used to mean "my lot" or "my portion in life". This would parallel the other phrase "מנת כוסי" in the next line. "צור חבלי" would then mean "the Rock who is ...


3

@Gershon Gold is correct that the term for cooking is בישול. Refer to the Targum and Peirush Yonatan on Breishit 43:16, where Yosef uses the term טבוח טבח. There, Peirush Yonatan says that this refers to "slaughtering" or "butchering" a goat. So, your original assumption seems correct that the Sar Hatabahim was the chief butcher. As to how the term "מטבח" ...


3

The Ibn Ezra chapter 37 verse 36 writes שר הטבחים. תמצא זה הלשון על הרג ועל בישול. ודברי המתרגם נכונים. We find the use of this word for killing and for cooking. And the words of the Targum are proper. The fancy edition brings instances of these usages. For the killing option he sends to Daniel 2 14 רב טבחיא די מלכא די נפק לקטלה לחכימי בבל. For the ...


2

The Siddur Shay LaMora quotes the Olas Tamid according to Rashi's first explination to Tehillim 16:5 that it means all good that I have comes from Him.


2

שרת"י במדינות on תרגום יונתן cites אגרא דכלה: ואפשר ס"ל, דלא מנה הכתוב רק אותן שנים אחר שנולדו לו הבנים, ולא מנו אותן השנים קודם שבא למצרים. ולפי זה היה משה קרוב לשבע שנים כשמת לוי "Perhaps, he understands that the verse only counted those years after he gave birth to children, and didn't count the years before he arrived in Egypt. According to this, ...


2

According to this site you can download a german translation of the Tanach by (Reform Rabbi[1]) Dr. Ludwig Philippson from here.


2

Mechon Mamre has the introduction translated interlinearly though not artscroll-style. Sefaria has a number of chapters (see here for one) translated with the english side-by-side, mostly in Sefer HaMadda. Because the translation is crowd-sourced (though moderated for accuracy) that "number" may be larger by the time you click the link. (full disclosure: I ...


2

SA OC 285:1 States the requirement is 2 times mikra and 1 time Targum. It is clear from the commentaries that Targum means Targum Unkilus. 285:2 allows Rashi, stating the both are done by one who fears Heaven. MB 5 (and Be'er Heiteiv 3) quote the Taz, recomending a good explanatory text such as Tzeiena Ur'ena, to be used in place of Rashi, if the person is ...


2

Chabad has a partial translation online. it includes the parts that are included in hok l'yisrael. The translation is by Rabbi Rahmiel-Hayyim Drizin. I don't know if that will include what you're looking for. There's also a partial translation from 1904 online at sacred-texts. The Kabbalah Education and Research center has one, but I'm not sure if it's ...


2

צור חבלי בעת צרה is an idiomatic expression. "צור חבלי" means literally "my rope's rock". It is referring to an anchor. So the plain translation (meaning according to peshat) is "My anchor in times of trouble." There are many ways to give it allegorical meaning as well as according to the Kabbalistic interpretations. But all these other meanings must relate ...


2

Paragraph 1 of your question quotes Rambam Hilchot Tefilla 12:11. This refers to reading the Torah as is seen from the first halocho: Tefilah and Birkat Kohanim - Chapter Thirteen Halacha 1 Moses, our teacher, ordained that the Jews should read the Torah publicly on the Sabbath and on Monday and Thursday mornings, so the [people] would never have ...


2

DanF got it right. "Tabach" means "butcher." Modern Hebrew has confused that with cooking a bit, a kitchen is called a "mitbach", again, old-fashioned cooks had to slaughter their own stuff. As for the Sar Hatabachim, Ramban says we don't know if his job was butchering animals, or if he was an executioner! (The latter would make sense as the guy has his own ...



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