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32

As Danny Schoemann says, it's a ketubah. A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. The text in this form matches the standard text presented and translated on this Chabad.org page. People Groom: Yehuda Leib, son of Avraham Noah. He is also a Levi Bride: Toiba Rachel, daughter of Yisrael Arye Witness: Aharon Leib, son of Moshe the Levi Witness: Abba David, ...


12

The religious implication of this ketubah is that it may be possible to use it to establish, in a Jewish court, certain facts about the listed bride and groom: That they were Jewish. On this basis, their children would also be Jewish, as would any children of their daughters, of their daughters' daughters, etc. That the man was a Levi. On this basis, he, ...


11

Perhaps because not everyone translates "Mei Raglayim" as urine. The Shitah Mekubetzet (Chof-Chet) to Kritot 6A brings 2 translations of "Mei Raglayin". The first being actual urine, but the second being a grass with that name. And the name makes it an embarrassment to use it for service in the Beit Hamikdash. I also remember reading another explanation ...


9

My sister made this chart. It is kind of a condensed version of the hebrew one: And here's a version with the titles transliterated, instead of translated:


6

I'm just going to assume that when you say "authoritative", you mean "valid interpretations of Rabbinic Judaism", and not that it was given to Moshe at Har Sinai or something like that. From my own experiences, I think that the "average" Orthodox Rabbi probably isn't aware of the Targum Neofiti or of its history, and is thus likely to dismiss it out of ...


5

At Alfasi.blogspot.com, I have translated the Rif (into English) for the following masechtot: bava batra bava kamma beitza brachot chagiga eruvin gittin ketubot kiddushin megillah moed katan nedarim niddah pesachim rosh hashana shabbat succah taanit yevamot yoma


5

The English translation I've seen most for Ruach HaKodesh is "Divine inspiration." This translation is consistent with its usage in Jewish texts, as described concisely in this Everything2 entry, to refer to a kind of sub-prophecy or Divinely-provided intuitive sense. This sense is consistent with the various uses of this concept in the Talmud, cataloged in ...


5

The bottom of the pot: the word שול denotes the bottom part of a vessel, garment or animal. So, for example, the skirts of a robe or the bottom-most rim of a cauldron. You can see Jastrow (s.v. שול) for examples. In this instance, the Mishna Berurah is speaking of a pot that is placed in such a fashion that the bottom part of it is coming into contact with ...


4

As Noach mi Frankfurt said in a comment, there are four English translations: Soncino, Neusner, Artscroll, and Koren/Steinsaltz. I've worked with three of them (I don't know Neusner), and for a beginner I recommend the last, accompanied by a study partner or, at the very least, an introduction to talmud. None of these translations are particularly aimed ...


4

http://www.sefaria.org/Berakhot.2a hope this is helpful to you regards


4

The Kehot Annotated Siddur translates it as "the strength of my lot in times of distress". The "my lot" would be like Devarim 32:9: יַעֲקֹב, חֶבֶל נַחֲלָתוֹ Jacob the lot of His inheritance The Siddur Shay Lamorah quotes Iyun Tefilah that it means that He is my Rock and Refuge (מעוז) to save me from the pains which grab me at a time of trouble. ...


4

This morning, I davened in a shul that I don't normally daven in, and I noticed that they had some siddurim that I don't usually see around. So I decided to do some research for your question, and here's what I found: Siddur Tehillat Hashem (fourth edition, April 2004) translates מי רגלים as "water of Raglayim," and cites the gemara Kerisus 6a-b (both ...


4

To the title question, “Is there still a mesora on how to write the Torah in Greek?”: The Rambam in Mishneh Torah writes that Greek language has been forgotten. Laws of Tefillin, Mezuzah and Sefer Torah - Chapter One Halacha 19 Tefillin and mezuzot may be written only in Assyrian script. Permission was granted to write Torah scrolls in Greek ...


4

Sefaria.org has the complete Ramban on the Torah online for free in Hebrew, with a small minority of sections so far community-translated into English: Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Deuteronomy They have a channel for submitting requests for translation of specific sections, and the requests are put on a queue for community translation.


4

this isn't a religious implication, but it could probably serve as document to help prove Jewish lineage if you were to ever consider Israeli citizenship (Aliyah). And maybe if you were looking for a Jewish name for a child, you might consider one of these names, or a variation in English, as is traditional to name a child after one of the ancestors. Names ...


3

Good question. See here and here for more. The most common name in the Jewish Bible for God is spelled in Hebrew letters that would roughly correspond with YHVH in English (Hebrew doesn't always use vowels); this is known as the "Tetragrammaton", i.e. the four-letter name of God. Jews don't pronounce that as written, instead they pronounce it "Adonai", ...


3

Targum Yonatan, the chief traditional translator of the books of the Prophets, translates this phrase into Aramaic as "גְבַר עָבֵיד רְעוּתֵהּ", which means "a man who does His will." So, "a man after His own heart" would be a reasonable colloquial and literal translation, and indeed is the one chosen by the JPS 1917 translation that was linked into the ...


3

I have looked into this a little in the past, so I can't recall particular sources, but the gist of it is as follows: Some wish to translate it as in "חבל נחלתו" and many other instances in which it is used to mean "my lot" or "my portion in life". This would parallel the other phrase "מנת כוסי" in the next line. "צור חבלי" would then mean "the Rock who is ...


3

@Gershon Gold is correct that the term for cooking is בישול. Refer to the Targum and Peirush Yonatan on Breishit 43:16, where Yosef uses the term טבוח טבח. There, Peirush Yonatan says that this refers to "slaughtering" or "butchering" a goat. So, your original assumption seems correct that the Sar Hatabahim was the chief butcher. As to how the term "מטבח" ...


3

The Ibn Ezra chapter 37 verse 36 writes שר הטבחים. תמצא זה הלשון על הרג ועל בישול. ודברי המתרגם נכונים. We find the use of this word for killing and for cooking. And the words of the Targum are proper. The fancy edition brings instances of these usages. For the killing option he sends to Daniel 2 14 רב טבחיא די מלכא די נפק לקטלה לחכימי בבל. For the ...


3

It's called המתרגם. The reason it's hard to find is because it is not consistently printed in the same place in all masechtos. Check before and after the Maharsha, that's usually where the printers found place to squeeze it in. The standard Vilna 'Shaar Blaat' mentions it's collation at the bottom of side two in the section ומלבד כל אלו הוספנו by number 15, ...


3

It means who didn't explain it, why we eat all those things, so saying just the words wouldn't be sufficient either, so sign language is just fine. שולחן ערוך אורח חיים תעג סעיף ו הגה: ויאמר בלשון שמבינים הנשים והקטנים או יפרש להם הענין וכן עשה ר"י מלונדרי כל ההגדה בלשון לע"ז כדי שיבינו הנשים והקטנים Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 473:6 Note: And he should ...


3

The Maharsha on your Gemara states that he believes Yonatan ben Uziel did not translate the Torah. אלא שלא היה יונתן חש לפרש התורה אז מטעמא דלקמן דמפרש' מלתא ולא היה מפרש רק נביאים דאיכא מילי דמסתמן עד שבא אונקלוס ופירש לדורו גם התורה The Chida (שם הגדולים: תרגומים, pg 33-34 here) discusses the question of the origin of Targum Yonatan, bringing ...


2

The Siddur Shay LaMora quotes the Olas Tamid according to Rashi's first explination to Tehillim 16:5 that it means all good that I have comes from Him.


2

Chabad has a partial translation online. it includes the parts that are included in hok l'yisrael. The translation is by Rabbi Rahmiel-Hayyim Drizin. I don't know if that will include what you're looking for. There's also a partial translation from 1904 online at sacred-texts. The Kabbalah Education and Research center has one, but I'm not sure if it's ...


2

There seems to be such a publication - and you can see the Tractate on Bava Metzia here. I can't figure out how to get to the other volumes, if they exist. It was written by R' Nisim Binyamin Ochana, and printed in Port Sa'id in 1929


2

DanF got it right. "Tabach" means "butcher." Modern Hebrew has confused that with cooking a bit, a kitchen is called a "mitbach", again, old-fashioned cooks had to slaughter their own stuff. As for the Sar Hatabachim, Ramban says we don't know if his job was butchering animals, or if he was an executioner! (The latter would make sense as the guy has his own ...


2

Paragraph 1 of your question quotes Rambam Hilchot Tefilla 12:11. This refers to reading the Torah as is seen from the first halocho: Tefilah and Birkat Kohanim - Chapter Thirteen Halacha 1 Moses, our teacher, ordained that the Jews should read the Torah publicly on the Sabbath and on Monday and Thursday mornings, so the [people] would never have ...



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