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22

It certainly doesn't mean electricity! The truth is, we don't really know what it means. And whatever it is, studying it is dangerous! Some of you may recall the story in BT Hagiga 13a, where a child is studying Ezekiel, ponders over the meaning of hashmal, and was consumed by fire. You have been warned... From the context, it appears to be some kind of ...


21

It's at least as old as the Sh'la (around 1600), according to Taame Haminhagim, kuntres acharon 94 to paragraph 396, which says in the Sh'la's name, via the Baer Hetev OC 307:2: "Someone visiting his friend on Shabas should not say, e.g., 'good morning' as on a weekday, but rather 'shabas shalom' or 'shabas tov', to fulfill 'zachor es yom hashabas'." It ...


17

"L'chatchila" means "from the outset", meaning that before one did action 'x' the halacha was that it was forbidden. However, if one was not familiar with that halacha and did action 'x' without knowing that there was a problem, then "b'di'eved" ("after the fact") the halacha might be different, meaning the consequences of what was done would change. In ...


15

In British English, "corn" can mean any grain, not just maize (the plant native to America). See Merriam-Webster; Wiktionary.


14

The JPS 1917 translation is public domain. It can be found at http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0.htm among other places.


12

The Torah commands us regarding emotions all the time, e.g.: "Don't bear a grudge", "don't hate your fellow in your heart", "don't harbor resentment when you give [charity] to him", "because you didn't serve Hashem your Lord with happiness and a glad heart", "don't despise the Edomite, for he is your brother; don't despise the Egyptian, for you were a ...


11

It is prescribed in שער הכוונות (Sha'ar Hakavanos, published in the sixteenth century) in the 7th paragraph here) to announce it loudly upon arriving home on Friday night for the reasons mentioned by msh210.


11

Actually, the earliest rabbinic sources present the Greek translation (the Septuagint) in glowing terms. In the Mishna, Megillah 1:8, Rabban Shimon ben Gamliel is quoted as having said that Greek is the only language, other than Hebrew, in which it is permissible to write sifrei Torah. Commenting on this, the Jerusalem Talmud (Megillah 71c) says that the ...


11

Hebrew is the language of the Torah. The holy language. Translation inevitably creates a certain perspective on the text, as a Hebrew word can have multiple meanings or interpretations. A word for word translation would not make sense. The meaning often gets simplified, if not lost, in translation.


10

Rashi, Radak, ibn Ezra and the M'tzudos all seem to say it means "you have caused me to hear" your command, i.e. informed me of it, though literally, yes, it means "you have dug me ears".


10

The standard understanding is that it means "memory of" either way, just a question of how it's vowelized. (You'll find both vowelizations in different texts of Psalm 145, known to most of us as the daily "Ashrei", on the line "zecher rav tuvcha..."). But just for fun, the Gemara, (b. bathra 21a), records a discussion wherein Joab thought the commandment ...


9

There is at least one possible usage of קרח in Tanach in the sense of "ice" - Ezek. 1:22 (כעין הקרח הנורא), which Targum Yonasan translates as גליד חסין, "strong ice." [Metzudos also renders some other instances of קרח as גליד, the Talmudic word for ice (from the root גלד, as you noted), as in Mikvaos 7:1 and Bava Basra 20a.] To follow up on msh210's point, ...


9

There are two equally-valid ways of reading the verses (both found in classical commentaries): Abraham was sitting in the Elonei of Mamre, outside his tent at the heat of the day; when G-d appeared to him. Abraham then looked up and saw three men; [recognizing it was more important to do kindness to strangers right now than to sit and continue having his ...


9

I think you are mixing up 3 different phrases. 1 ברוך אתה ה Baruch Attah Adonai. This phrase is commonly translated as "Blessed are you Lord," meaning "you, the Lord, are blessed" a statement of fact. It is used to begin most ritual blessings. 2 ברכו את ה המבורך Barechu et Adonai HaMevorach. This phrase means "Bless the Lord-who-is-Blessed." "Bless" here ...


9

In Beraishis 41 (45) Osnat is mentioned as the daughter of Potifera. Rashi comments there on the change of name. He says: Poti-phera: He is Potiphar, but he was called Poti-phera because he became emasculated since he desired Joseph for homosexual relations. — [from Sotah 13b]. So we see that he was not emasculated until he desired Joseph.


8

Well, Ibn Ezra (to Songs 5:10) says that paz actually means "precious stones." Rashi seems to agree, because he explains זהב מופז (I Kings 10:18) as meaning that "it gleams like a pearl", and in Daniel 10:5 he also says that כתם אופז means "an arrangement of pearls." Radak on the verse in Kings brings three possible translations for מופז: refined (i.e. ...


8

I doubt it would matter whether the verse contains Hashem's name, because when you say an entire verse (in the original Hebrew, or in the Targum), there is no concern about saying His name in vain - no matter how many times you repeat the verse. In any case, there is an opinion that you can substitute Rashi's commentary for the Targum (Shulchan Aruch, Orach ...


8

וַתְּדַבֵּ֨ר מִרְיָ֤ם וְאַהֲרֹן֙ בְּמֹשֶׁ֔ה Separating Miriam as the subject of one clause from Aharon as the subject of another clause is not syntactically plausible for a couple reasons: They are joined by the cantillation marks, which delimit "Miryam v'Aharon" as a noun phrase. The second clause "Aharon was against" is missing a verb in the ...


8

The Hebrew is משתין בקיר, mashtin b'kir. Mashtin is used frequently in the Talmud for "urinate", and kir is wall. So David is saying "there won't be left alive even one thing-that-urinates-against-the-wall." The classical commentaries say that means either a male human being, or a dog. Either way, it was intended as a disparaging reference. Many English ...


8

Barchu is a plural imperative verb meaning "bless" (so, because of the plural, you can read that as "y'all bless"). Baruch is a passive participle conveying state; "baruch (noun)" means "blessed is (noun)", or in the case of "baruch atah...", "blessed are you".


8

The Shulchan Aruch OC 145:3 says that: האידנא לא נהגו לתרגם, משום דמה תועלת בתרגום כיון שאין מבינים אותו: And nowadays the custom is not to translate [to Aramaic] because what benefit is there to do so since we do not understand it. Additionally, the Tur there quotes a Yerushalmi that says that the meturgeman is not me'ackeiv (prevents the ...


8

The commentary M'tzudas Tziyon says it means a clear, smokeless fire. The commentary Mahari [=R. Yosef] Kara says it means a tongue of fire.


8

My sister made this chart. It is kind of a condensed version of the hebrew one: And here's a version with the titles transliterated, instead of translated:


7

the translation of the tatoo is the word "sun"


7

it's not in plural form, see how the verb is. another example in hebrew is the word maim (water), which has no singular or plural. this may seem plural to you but it actually isn't, simply because god is one. your question is basically on the quality of the translation. one can see (at least as an reflection) the importance each culture (or language) gives ...


7

"Anticipate" is exactly the word I would use. "Preempt" takes second place. (These might not be exact translations -- but hey, did you ever try to translate the word mechutan?)


7

I don't know of any site that provides multiple translations on the same page, but here are all the English Tanach websites that I know of. (Italics means the site only contains the first five books (Pentateuch), and an asterisk means it also contains select portions from Prophets (Haftorah). Regular font means the full Tanakh\Jewish Bible is available): ...


7

Kadesh is the masculine singular imperative: make kidush! (or: sanctify!) It's also a bare infinitive. Urchatz or r'chatz is the masculine singular imperative: (and) wash! Karpas is a matter of much discussion, but it's some sort of vegetable. Yachatz is the masculine singular third-person future tense transitive: He will divide. Magid is the masculine ...


7

If I'm not mistaken, Dayan Gukovitzky's Targum HaLaaz has a transliteration guide. It seems that Rashi did have a specific set of rules for doing this.



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