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The Baal HaTanya in Torah Or describes Lot as: קודם הבירור הי' לוט כלול באברהם בקדושה כמו סיגים אשר קודם הצירוף ובירור מעורבים הם עם זהב. ולו"ט בגי' מ"ה אחורי' דשם מ"ה. אך הוא מקור חו"ב דקליפה לכן נק' לוט לשון קללה ולכן הלך לוט את אברהם קודם הבירור Before the purification, Lot was included in Avraham in holiness, like the impurities prior to the ...


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Mil, You may need to gain some sense on what items are considered "holy objects". I don't recall the full list, but among them are Torah scrolls, mezuzah, tefillin, etc. (I'll see if I can link something later). The point is that a printed Tanac"h is not within this category of what is called tashmishei kedusha ("holy objetcs"). That doesn't mean that you ...


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There is not a single source with every name. As mentioned above, Sefer Shaarei Orah by Rabbi Yosef Gikatilla is one of the classics and very comprehensive. But once you start dealing with the infinitely diverse permutations of the names it is quite literally, בלי גבול!


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Koren Tanakhs print both the Christian-derived chapters and the ancient Jewish system of sedarim. It's interesting to see where the sedarim break up differently than the chapters (once a teacher told me that the number is such that if you read one a day, exempting Shabbat, Yom Tov [I think counting one day for Yom Tov as it's an Eretz Yisraeli system] and ...


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The two main texts you probably want to see, in terms of the Masoretic texts, are the Leningrad and Aleppo Codicies, available online here and here respectively. See here for many more old scanned manuscripts.


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Sure. Not veils, but other face coverings: David, after Avshalom's death: והמלך לאט את פניו (II Shmuel 19:5) Eliyahu at Har Chorev: וילט פניו באדרתו (I Melachim 19:13) Michayhu for his "playact" to Achav: ויתחפש באפר על עיניו (I Melachim 20:38) Yechezkel during his "playacting" of Tzidkiyahu's flight: פניך תכסה (Yechezkel 12:6), and Tzidkiyahu himself: ...


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this book p. 93 mentions something about the orthography and phonology of "Yerushalayim". Summarizing some points: He seems to indicate that a full spelling with the 2nd yod would inidicate a tripthong making the pronunciation ayim. However, because the full spelling is rarely seen in Tanac"h, and the missing yod is the more common format, the author ...


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The 1917 JPS Translation is the best Bible for finding out what the Bible says in English, but not necessarily for finding out what it means. There are many ambiguous phrases in the Bible, and in the Torah, and the 1917 JPS leaves the ambiguity without interpreting it for you. If you want an interpretive Bible there are many, some people recommend Artscroll, ...


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Chabad.org has great translation with Rashi commentaries. It's the best you can find online.


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It was taught in Beraisa: Rav Yehudah is saying: Anyone who translates verse literally is a liar. והתניא ר' יהודה אומר המתרגם פסוק כצורתו הרי זה בדאי קידושין מט. בסוף העמוד http://beta.hebrewbooks.org/shas.aspx?mesechta=20&daf=49&format=pdf


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When it comes to Tanakh... Well, we have Oral Torah to guide us back to how the text was understood when we first got it. When it comes to Medrash... This has been asked and answered before; @mevaqesh pointed me to Belief in midrashim yesterday. RSR Hirsch's non-literalist position, as described by R' Breuer: ...


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Generally speaking, whether or not a biblical passage can/should be taken literally depends on the context as well as reliable traditions, both of which depend on an acquired level of discernment. An important distinction in this regard is the difference between narrative passages and legal ones (i.e. mitzvoth-commandments). Many symbolic mitzvoth, such as ...


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The Palestinian Talmud (Taanis 21a) states that there is only verse in which the Jewish people are referred to as Zion. The verse is in Isaiah 51, 16: וָאָשִׂים דְּבָרַי בְּפִיךָ וּבְצֵל יָדִי כִּסִּיתִיךָ לִנְטֹעַ שָׁמַיִם וְלִיסֹד אָרֶץ וְלֵאמֹר לְצִיּוֹן עַמִּי אָתָּה Here is the quote from the Talmud: א"ר חיננא בר פפא חוזרני על כל המקרא ולא מצאנו ...


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By saying 'our God' it seems to imply that there are other gods. There are. See e.g. Deuteronomy 8:19 "וְהָלַכְתָּ אַחֲרֵי אֱלֹהִים אֲחֵרִים", "and you go after other gods". Not that they're real gods, of course, by which I mean that they don't have whatever powers and characteristics we ascribe to God, but they are called "gods" in the Torah, so it ...


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They were both tall people (giants), but they are a different group of people and they lived in different areas. One of the key verses is Deuteronomy 2:10-11 (texts from Sefaria): הָאֵמִ֥ים לְפָנִ֖ים יָ֣שְׁבוּ בָ֑הּ עַ֣ם גָּד֥וֹל וְרַ֛ב וָרָ֖ם כָּעֲנָקִֽים׃ רְפָאִ֛ים יֵחָשְׁב֥וּ אַף־הֵ֖ם כָּעֲנָקִ֑ים וְהַמֹּ֣אָבִ֔ים יִקְרְא֥וּ לָהֶ֖ם אֵמִֽים׃ ...


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Rashi points out that these were different groups of of "giants". The Art Scroll commentary on Devarim 10-11 refers to Rashi and explained that the nation of Eimim were colloquially considered like Refaim "which was a different family of giants (Anakim)". However, they were not the Refaim whose territory Bnai Yisrael were going to conquer. The Eimim had been ...



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