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I have recorded a brief Hebrew-English translation with all the Rashis succinctly woven into the translation. In addition, anything which is difficult to understand I add additional comments from other commentaries. One of my goals is that unlike many nach shiurim I aim to translate accurately every word. All previous Shiurim are available in a google drive ...


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אֲנִי is the basic word "I". It is just about always followed by an adjective or noun. It is used the vast majority of times both in Tanakh and later writings. אָנֹכִי is a more nuanced version of אֲנִי. It also means "I", but it's a more robust, stronger version. It's main use is for emphasis, a bold I as it were. Let me give an example. "Ani Hashem" is ...


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After lots of searching, I finally found a paper on this topic: "The Two Forms of First Person Singular Pronoun in Biblical Hebrew: Redundancy or Expressive Contrast?" by E. J. Revell, Journal of Semitic Studies 40 (1995), pp. 199–207. The crux of Revell's argument is that "אני is typically used by status-marked human speakers, אנכי by others." He notes ...


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If irony counts as humor, the Parshios of Yetzias Mitzrayim are full of irony. I have 2 verses corroborate what I'm saying: The first verse is talking directly about the Exodus experience: אֲשֶׁר הִתְעַלַּלְתִּי בְּמִצְרַיִם That I made a mockery of Egypt Exodus 10:2 The 2nd verse is talking about Hashem's response to the nations that attack the Jews in ...


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כזוַיִּבְרָא אֱלֹהִים | אֶת הָאָדָם בְּצַלְמוֹ בְּצֶלֶם אֱלֹהִים בָּרָא אֹתוֹ זָכָר וּנְקֵבָה בָּרָא אֹתָם 27 And God created man in His image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. God must have a sense of humor. =)


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This Sefaria website might be helpful. R. Yechiel Michel Stern has a sefer called התורה התמימה which is essentially a Torah Temimah on Nach. Five volumes are available on hebrewbooks.org: Yehoshua, Shoftim, Shmuel, Tehillim, Chamesh Megillot.


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From here, it seems there may only (?!) be that verse from Psalms (7:3): פן יטרף כאריה נפשי פרק ואין מציל If you're okay with the last word beginning with a ל (rather than ending with one), you could also use from אשת חיל (cited here): פיה פתחה בחכמה ותורת חסד על לשונה Or, if you're also okay with it being a quote from the Shabbat prayer service ...


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According to the appendix of Karaite Judaism and Historical Understanding by Fred Astren, they echo the idea of a train of tradition from Moses through to the rabbis. This is their chain Moses received the Torah from Sinai, and transmitted it to Joshua, and Joshua to the elders, and the elders to the prophets. The prophets transmitted it to the men of ...



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