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To summarize (and perhaps embellish) Prof. Yaakov Elman's The Rebirth of Omnisignificant Biblical Exegesis in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, which addresses all this at length, Chazal seemed to assume that every word in the Torah was deliberate, meaningful, and not mere stylistic flourish. However, in response to Karaism, Rav Saadya Gaon greatly ...


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Let's first clarify that the literary device "Read not..." is an attempt to discover the layers of meaning in the word; it is not intended to invalidate in any way the accepted pronunciation. (Artscroll Siddur) The Torah is written without vowels; vowels are actually a fairly recent innovation. So why was the Torah given without vowels? Doesn't that leave ...


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Rashi, a central commentator explains the biblical verse from Zecharyah 8:10 which he understands to refer to someone who leaves Torah study to study anything else. The Talmud then discusses others who have no peace. This section mentions someone who chooses to leave one source of learning and jump to another (and it seems, does so still expecting the same ...


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This seems to be dependent on the text of the Talmudic passage in Chagiga 10a. In conformance with the printed text of Rashi's commentary, the printed Talmud (Vilna edition) states: כיון שיוצא אדם מדבר הלכה לדבר מקרא - שוב אין לו שלום. ושמואל אמר: זה הפורש מתלמוד למשנה, ורבי יוחנן אמר: אפילו מתלמוד לתלמוד. "Rav said once a person leaves matters of ...


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Genesis 6 Rashi the sons of the nobles: Heb. בְּנֵי הָאֱלֹהִים, the sons of the princes (Targumim) and the judges (Gen. Rabbah 26:5). Another explanation: בְּנֵי הָאֱלֹהִים are the princes who go as messengers of the Omnipresent. They too mingled with them (Pirkei d’Rabbi Eliezer, ch. 22). Every אֱלֹהִים in Scripture is an expression of authority, and the ...


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The Tanakh Simanim is based for the most part on the Aleppo Codex, and where this version is lacking, on the Leningrad Codex. (see footnote 9 here). As such it is an authoritative version that you can rely on. In addition Feldheim is a well-known Orthodox publishing house with an excellent reputation. Be aware though that the Feldheim edition is ...


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This is a great book that is easy to read with family. It gives a summary of every chapter in every book of nach... https://seforimdeals.com/store15/index.php/all-books-seforim/yeshiva-seforim/nach/journey-through-nach-2-vol-set.html


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I want to learn Nach on a "Pashat Pashut" format. I don't want to read the Hebrew-English Nach, neither the "fancy" Meforshim that delve through all of the Devrei Torah on each Passuk. Sounds like the M'tzudos would be a perfect fit. This is a pair of commentaries written in the 1700s by R. David Altschuler. M'tzudas Tziyon explains difficult words and ...



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