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25

Either what was posted on that forum is about half-correct, or your understanding of what was said was about half-correct. Traditional Judaism does believe that "[H]oly texts are the revealed word of the divine and thus cannot ever be contradicted by modern research, philosophy or belief systems." It is not true "[t]hat it is understood that the scripture ...


21

I agree with the answer Daniel gave, but I would clarify things slightly differently. 1) Orthodox Judaism believes that the Torah is the literal Word of G-d. This is one of the Thirteen Principles of Faith as brought down by Maimonides: "We do not know exactly how the Torah was transmitted to Moses. But when it was transmitted, Moses merely wrote it ...


13

I did some calculations and came up with the top 5 for each sefer in Tanach, along with the top twenty overall. I also provided my list of top 10 for Torah and Tehillim for comparison with AvnerMil's. For the Tanach source, i used Mechon Mamre's niqqudless Tanach. The code is available here on GitHub Gists. Comes with a README explaining how to run it. ...


9

During the Second Temple Period, there were different sects with different interpretations of Judaism. The descendants of the Pharisees wrote the Talmud, which defined Orthodox Judaism as we know today. (What follows is from Rabbi Shneur Leiman's lecture on yutorah.org) The Dead Sea Scrolls belonged to a sect that was clearly not the Pharisees; it includes ...


9

The question as currently phrased is asked by, among others, R. Yosef Albo in Sefer HaIkarim 3:23 (which is why I'm unsure as to why it still has a negative score). Since I don't have a better way of doing this, I'm going to just paste here what I wrote to this similar question, with a couple of variations. 1. Idiomatic Expressions Some differences between ...


8

The source is Gemara Nazir 23b: אמר ר"נ בר יצחק גדולה עבירה לשמה ממצוה שלא לשמה והאמר רב יהודה אמר רב לעולם יעסוק אדם בתורה ובמצות אפי' שלא לשמן שמתוך שלא לשמן בא לשמן אלא אימא כמצוה שלא לשמה דכתיב (שופטים ה, כד) תבורך מנשים יעל אשת חבר הקני מנשים באהל תבורך מאן נשים שבאהל שרה רבקה רחל ולאה א"ר יוחנן שבע בעילות בעל אותו רשע באותה שעה שנאמר (שופטים ה, כז) ...


8

I don't know if it counts as a study, but how about a relevant textbook? The book Biblical Hebrew for Students of Modern Israeli Hebrew looks like it will help you. It's used in the rabbinic program at Hebrew Union College and probably other places (though I only have first-hand knowledge of HUC). Several non-yeshiva programs I'm aware of start by ...


7

The perspective of Orthodox Jews vis-a-vis the Dead sea scrolls varies from non recognition, ambivalence, to outright excitement. For those who do not view it as a life altering find see them as 1. Either a validation of what was already known to them ie. Small variance in textual differences due to a very solid mesorah. 2. the other non canonical scrolls ...


6

I've always thought that Yosef was making a joke when interpreting the baker's dream. He tells the butler ישא פרעה את ראשך - Pharaoh will "lift up your head", meaning, restore him to his position. He then tells the baker ישא פרעה את ראשך מעליך - Pharaoh will "lift up your head" from on you, an unusual way of saying he'll be hanged. Because of the similarity ...


6

One way to know that it is substantially the same is by comparing it to the Samaritan Pentateuch which is considered to date sometime between the end of the first temple period up until as late as the Hasmonean period. While technically, there are some 6000 variations between the two versions, most are basically minor spelling or grammatical variations and ...


6

From the Ohr Somayach "Ask the Rabbi" site: We see evidence that Adam spoke Hebrew because he gave Eve two names, each of which makes sense only in Hebrew. He called her isha (woman) because "she was taken from ish (man)," and he called her Chava (Eve) because "she was to be Mother of all chai (life)." The very name Adam is from the Hebrew word ...


6

This answer is a summary of Rabbi Jachter's writeup on this subject. He provides four (and a half) justifications for why putting pesukim to music is permissible. The first is that the prohibition was only for Shir Hashirim, because if it is put to music, it is more prone to being misinterpreted as a simple love song. (suggested but not accepted by Igrot ...


6

The Ibn Ezra (cited by the Malbim as being in Parshas Bo, but I assume he means to refer to his comments to Shemos 3:15) explains that ה' צבא-ות refers to Hashem being the upholder of the צבא השמים. The Radak to Yeshaya 6:3 says that it refers to the armies on High and below. The Malbim to Yeshaya 6:3 (you can see it here), in explaining the line ק' ק' ק' ...


5

Short answer from Rabbi Shlomo Aviner: Naming a Daughter after a Male Relative Q: I saw that Ha-Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach said that there is absolutely no reason to name a daughter after a male relative (Ve-Alehu Lo Yibul Volume 2, p. 142). And it is written in Shut Tzitz Eliezer (7:49 #13) that a strict person will refrain from doing so. ...


5

Yes. It is possible to view digital copies of some of the scrolls on this website, which is maintained by the Israel Antiquities Authority. I don't know if they have all the scrolls yet, but I believe that they intend to have all of them up there, eventually.


5

It's not only this imperative verb that has an "extra" suffixed ה. See also הִשָּׁבְעָה in B'reshis 21:23, מִכְרָה‎ in 25:31, שִׁכְבָה in 39:7, and many other imperatives. See Gesenius, ¶48i. In ¶48e he writes that this form expresses the direction of the will to an action and thus denotes especially self-encouragement (in the 1st plur. an exhortation to ...


5

As msh210 already pointed out, the form שִׁלְחָה is not the feminine construct, it is actually the masculine emphatic imperative. As to why Tanach uses the emphatic imperative rather than the normal one, there is an excellent article by Fassberg which discusses this. It appears that the emphatic imperative שִׁלְחָה is used when the action of the verb is ...


5

The prohibition against adding and subtracting applies only to the mitzvot (commandments). The Torah itself informs us that prophecy would continue after Moses and gives us commandments on how to recognize a true prophet (Deut. 18:15-22). Inclusion in the canon (the only books we would consider Biblical) is a recognition that the work was written under ...


5

Chida in Shem Hagedolim (page 7 of the file) quotes Seder Hadoros, who says that the commentary on Iyov isn't from Rashi. On that same page he also quotes someone who claims that none of the commentary on Neviim is from Rashi, although he disagrees with that.


4

Moshe rabbeinu made a couple, according to Rashi: Shmos 32:18 וַיֹּאמֶר, אֵין קוֹל עֲנוֹת גְּבוּרָה, וְאֵין קוֹל, עֲנוֹת חֲלוּשָׁה; קוֹל עַנּוֹת, אָנֹכִי שֹׁמֵעַ. (The dagesh on עַנּוֹת drives the point home.) Bamidbar 21:9 וַיַּעַשׂ מֹשֶׁה נְחַשׁ נְחֹשֶׁת Which, according to Rashi, was a bit of a pun. Yeshaya 5:7 וַיְקַו לְמִשְׁפָּט וְהִנֵּה מִשְׂפָּח, ...


4

I do not have the entire Tanach calculated, but as per the Torah and Tehillim, you are right :) Here are the top ten for in the Torah תִשְׂתָּרֵר=1500 שַׁרְשְׁרֹת=1400 וְעַשְׁתְּרֹת=1376 בְּעַשְׁתְּרֹת=1372 שְׁקַעֲרוּרֹת=1276 תִתְחַתֵּן=1258 וְהִתְקַדִּשְׁתֶּם=1255 תְּשׁוּקָתֵךְ=1226 בְּתַחְתִּית=1220 תַּחְתִּית=1218 Top ten in the Tehillim: ...


4

The source you are looking for is the Rambam's responsa (§149), where the Rambam writes: השאלה הל"א שאלה מאמר ר' יוחנן גוי שעסק בתורה חייב מיתה, האם זה הלכה והחייב כל בר ישראל להמנע (מללמדו) דבר מן המצות חוץ משבע מצות או להעמידו עליהן, אם לאו? התשובה היא הלכה בלא ספק. וכאשר יד ישראל תקיפה עליהם, מונעים אותו מתלמוד תורה עד שיתגייר. אבל לא יהרג, אם ...


4

There are 304,805 letters in the Torah. There are 79,976 words in the Torah. There are 5,888 or 5,845 verses in the Torah. Bereishit (Genesis) 12 Sidrot 50 Chapters 1,534 Verses Shmot (Exodus) 11 Sidrot 40 Chapter 1,209 Verses Vayikra (Leviticus) 10 Sidrot 27 Chapters 859 Verses Bamidbar (Numbers) 10 Sidrot 36 Chapters 1,288 ...


4

Sanhedrin 101a תנו רבנן הקורא פסוק של שיר השירים ועושה אותו כמין זמר והקורא פסוק בבית משתאות בלא זמנו מביא רעה לעולם מפני שהתורה חוגרת שק ועומדת לפני הקב"ה ואומרת לפניו רבונו של עולם עשאוני בניך ככנור שמנגנין בו לצים ה"ג הקורא שיר השירים ועושה אותו כמין זמר. שקורא בנגינה אחרת שאינו נקוד בה ועושה אותה כמין שיר אע"פ שמשיר השירים הוא ועיקרו שיר אסור ...


4

I don't think there is any single "most common way", as i've personally seen several. Some chumashim will print the ktiv without vowels, and the kri next to it. Others will do the same, but in small print, write קרי and כתיב. Still others will only include the ktiv (without vowels) in the text, and have a note in the margin with the kri. Others use the ...


4

The fifth chapter of Avos says one hallmark of a chacham, wise person, is that mode al haemes, he acknowledges the truth. Rashi says this refers to someone who has erred and acknowledges a correction.


4

At least two words in Tanach are tied for the longest word, at 11 letters each: וְהָאֲחַשְׁדַּרְפְּנִים in Esther 9:3, and וּכְתוֹעֲבוֹתֵיהֶן in Yechezkel 16:47 (source).


4

No, Modern Hebrew, the contemporary spoken and written language, is not identical with Biblical Hebrew, the version[s] of the language in which Tanach was written. Hebrew, like all natural languages, has evolved over time from the times of Tanach until today, and on top of that, Modern Hebrew is the result of an intentional revival and modernization of the ...


3

The idea that Moses' wife (Tzipporah) was Hamitic comes from a comment Miriam made about him. Moses was spending a lot of time with God and since one had to be in a state of purity to talk to God, Moses was rarely intimate with his wife. Miriam refers to Moses' wife as a Cushite (Ethiopian) This is explained as either being idomatic or as being to a ...



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