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11

Yes, the Sadducees did believe they were Jewish. However, the confounding factor in the quotes you provide is probably this: That in many gemaras, because of medieval censors, "Christian" or rather "Min" (Christian sectarian) was replaced with "Sadducee". See for example the London manuscript of Yoma 56b that you cited above. I have drawn a red arrow to ...


11

I think the most complete indexing book of that kind is תורה הכתובה והמסורה by אהרן הימן. It's published by דביר in three volumes. It goes through the whole Bible verse by verse, giving for each verse a list of locations in Talmud and Midrash where the verse is mentioned in some way. It's available on HebrewBooks: vol 1 (torah) vol 2 (nevi'im) vol 3 ...


10

Mishne Berurah (238, Shaar HaTziyun 1) writes that the Midrash (Pirkei d'Rebbi Eliezer 46 and Tanchumah Parsha Ki Sisa 36) writes that Moshe Rabenu was taught the Written Torah during the day and the Oral Torah at night. From this Midrash the Ba'er Hetev (2) (and Arizal [ed]) concludes that one should not learn the written Torah at night. The Pri Megadim ...


10

Well, I'll just treat this as a programming assignment. If we use mechon-mamre's masoretic text without vowels; if we ignore punctuation and paragraph marks; if we use the ksiv and not kri (occasionally there's a note -- "the scroll will say this, but read that out-loud instead), I'm getting 135 such verses. A lot of them you'd expect to find repeated a lot, ...


9

Textual indicators abound for the eternal and immutable nature of the Torah. Besides examples provided in other answers, here are a couple more examples: Even all that the LORD hath commanded you by the hand of Moses, from the day that the LORD gave commandment, and onward throughout your generations (B'midbar 15:23). And thou shalt keep His ...


8

Concerning Og, see Numbers Raba Hukat 32: ... that no strong one in the world arose that that was more fierce than he, (קשה הימנו‏)... And he remained from the mighty ones who were killed by Amrafel and his friends, (Gen 14)... And he was a husk of them, like peels of olives in the olive waste. So from this saying, it would seem that Og was the ...


8

During the Second Temple Period, there were different sects with different interpretations of Judaism. The descendants of the Pharisees wrote the Talmud, which defined Orthodox Judaism as we know today. (What follows is from Rabbi Shneur Leiman's lecture on yutorah.org) The Dead Sea Scrolls belonged to a sect that was clearly not the Pharisees; it includes ...


8

The source is Gemara Nazir 23b: אמר ר"נ בר יצחק גדולה עבירה לשמה ממצוה שלא לשמה והאמר רב יהודה אמר רב לעולם יעסוק אדם בתורה ובמצות אפי' שלא לשמן שמתוך שלא לשמן בא לשמן אלא אימא כמצוה שלא לשמה דכתיב (שופטים ה, כד) תבורך מנשים יעל אשת חבר הקני מנשים באהל תבורך מאן נשים שבאהל שרה רבקה רחל ולאה א"ר יוחנן שבע בעילות בעל אותו רשע באותה שעה שנאמר (שופטים ה, כז) ...


7

Habakkuk The prophet Habakkuk is thought to be the boy in the incident of Elisha and the Shunamite woman. Episode here: http://www.chabad.org/library/bible_cdo/aid/15910 The second line of his very short book starts "How long..." - your characteristic of impatience. The third line asks god "Why he shown him [iniquity]", - your characteristic of ...


7

The reason is that Job was not dictated to Moses by Hashem for the purpose of being put into the Torah. The words of the Torah were specifically for the history, halachos, and hashkafa of Bnei Yisrael. Thus Moshe wrote it at the lower level of nevua set up for Kesuvim. The Chumash is like the Neviim in that they were given as a message by Hashem to the Navi ...


7

Bava Batra 13b: אמר רבי מעשה והביאו לפנינו תורה נביאים וכתובים מדובקים כאחד והכשרנום Rebbi said: one time they brought before us Torah, Neviim and Ketuvim stuck together like one and we declared it Kosher.


7

Your question is based on the assumption that what chazal did was reinterpret. In fact the "Torah" as we know it today that was given at mt. sinai included both the oral and written traditions. when chazzal tells us the meaning of a posuk they aren't redefining it but explaining its intention.


6

The most explicit place in the Torah is Deuteronomy 13:2-6: יג,ב כִּי-יָקוּם בְּקִרְבְּךָ נָבִיא, אוֹ חֹלֵם חֲלוֹם; וְנָתַן אֵלֶיךָ אוֹת, אוֹ מוֹפֵת. יג,ג וּבָא הָאוֹת וְהַמּוֹפֵת, אֲשֶׁר-דִּבֶּר אֵלֶיךָ לֵאמֹר: נֵלְכָה אַחֲרֵי אֱלֹהִים אֲחֵרִים, אֲשֶׁר לֹא-יְדַעְתָּם--וְנָעָבְדֵם. יג,ד לֹא תִשְׁמַע, אֶל-דִּבְרֵי הַנָּבִיא הַהוּא, אוֹ אֶל-חוֹלֵם ...


6

Actually, there's no source for this story at all, save a desire to believe that the ordering of books within Tanakh was deliberate, rather than simply retroactive. The gemara (Bava Batra 15a-b) speaks of the order in which the books appear and of their composition, while the mishna (Yadayim 3:6) possibly alludes to a debate that concerned the scriptural ...


6

The perspective of Orthodox Jews vis-a-vis the Dead sea scrolls varies from non recognition, ambivalence, to outright excitement. For those who do not view it as a life altering find see them as 1. Either a validation of what was already known to them ie. Small variance in textual differences due to a very solid mesorah. 2. the other non canonical scrolls ...


6

From the Ohr Somayach "Ask the Rabbi" site: We see evidence that Adam spoke Hebrew because he gave Eve two names, each of which makes sense only in Hebrew. He called her isha (woman) because "she was taken from ish (man)," and he called her Chava (Eve) because "she was to be Mother of all chai (life)." The very name Adam is from the Hebrew word ...


5

R' Tzvi Hirsch Chayos in Mavo HaTalmud writes about various midrashic methodologies employed by Chazal in the Gemara and Midrash. In the twenty-first chapter, he discusses this tendency to identify a person mentioned in Tanach with someone else in Tanach, or to equate two names as belonging to the same person (e.g. "הוא מלאכי הוא עזרא"). Chayos treats this ...


5

I would offer three answers, which I believe may be true simultaneously. 1 While scribes were extremely careful for pesukim in Tanach, so as not to invalidate the kosher status of the sefer, they were not so careful when quoting pesukim when they occurred within the Gemara. Add to that that sometimes earlier manuscripts will shorten words or phrases with ...


5

Rav S.R. Hirsch in the Collected Writings Vol.1 in an article entitled "The Uniqueness of the Torah" writes that the connection between Shavuos and Matan Torah is only stated in the Torah Shebaal Peh in order to teach us that someone who does not accept the Torah Shebaal Peh never has had a Kabolas Hatorah


5

Indeed, in a number of places here in Israel, Tehillim are read publicly on a daily basis from Tehillim scrolls written on parchment. According to many authorities, there is also a special bracha that is to be recited prior to reading material from Ketuvim out of a parchment scroll: ברוך אתה ה' א-להינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וציונו לקרוא בכתבי הקודש ...


5

TheTrugmans and click on text.


5

Mechon Mamre has a google custom search for tanach, both Masoretic, and with chaserot spelled out.


5

We have a tradition that Psalms, for example, has multiple authors — as one might surmise from its incipits. Yet it has the imprimatur of holy men, who had divine inspiration in compiling it. Likewise for some other books of the Bible. There is no contradiction in that.


5

Many people believe that the Tanach is completely inerrant. Orthodox Jews (generally) believe that the Torah (Pentateuch), as the literal "Word of God," dictated directly from God to Moses, is inerrant. (I'm assuming "inerrant" means that everything is factually accurate. $) The Prophets and Writings are the works of people - composed, edited, and ...


5

You are correct that they are twisting what Jeremiah said in order to support their missionary efforts. Radak points out that the "newness" will be that the Bnai Yisrael will have grown to to the extent that they will no longer fall prey to the evil inclination (as occurred with the golden calf) and break it on their end. Malachi 3:22 points out that there ...


5

Although all agree that the Torah, as a practical matter, will not change, there is a disagreement between the Rambam and others (e.g. Sefer HaIkkarim 3:16) if this is an inherent quality, and thus a fundamental aspect of belief, or just something that G-d decided. In addition, within G-d's commandments, there is a concept of ניתנה תורה, ונתחדשה הלכה - when ...


5

Other answers have offered modern, more complete resources. I'll stick to basics: many, many traditional prints of Chumash and of Nach include something called Tol'dos Aharon, which lists, for each phrase, every citation of that phrase in Bavli and a few other sources. Or almost every. (And if I'm not mistaken, it doesn't count duplicates: if the same ...


4

Moshe rabbeinu made a couple, according to Rashi: Shmos 32:18 וַיֹּאמֶר, אֵין קוֹל עֲנוֹת גְּבוּרָה, וְאֵין קוֹל, עֲנוֹת חֲלוּשָׁה; קוֹל עַנּוֹת, אָנֹכִי שֹׁמֵעַ. (The dagesh on עַנּוֹת drives the point home.) Bamidbar 21:9 וַיַּעַשׂ מֹשֶׁה נְחַשׁ נְחֹשֶׁת Which, according to Rashi, was a bit of a pun. Yeshaya 5:7 וַיְקַו לְמִשְׁפָּט וְהִנֵּה מִשְׂפָּח, ...


4

Short answer from Rabbi Shlomo Aviner: Naming a Daughter after a Male Relative Q: I saw that Ha-Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach said that there is absolutely no reason to name a daughter after a male relative (Ve-Alehu Lo Yibul Volume 2, p. 142). And it is written in Shut Tzitz Eliezer (7:49 #13) that a strict person will refrain from doing so. ...


4

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 14 discusses Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers). He says that the source for having Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers) is the Gemara Brachos 61a which discusses how Hashem was the Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers) for Adam Harishon. Then he mentions that the Minhag is that the parents are the Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers). He brings this in the name of Shaalos ...



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