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29

Either what was posted on that forum is about half-correct, or your understanding of what was said was about half-correct. Traditional Judaism does believe that "[H]oly texts are the revealed word of the divine and thus cannot ever be contradicted by modern research, philosophy or belief systems." It is not true "[t]hat it is understood that the scripture ...


24

I agree with the answer Daniel gave, but I would clarify things slightly differently. 1) Orthodox Judaism believes that the Torah is the literal Word of G-d. This is one of the Thirteen Principles of Faith as brought down by Maimonides: "We do not know exactly how the Torah was transmitted to Moses. But when it was transmitted, Moses merely wrote it ...


12

Scrolls found in Ketef Hinnom contain the priestly blessing (of Numbers ch. 6) as preserved from the First Temple Era (700-650 BCE) The Isaiah scroll found in Qumran: "has been carbon-14 dated at least four times, giving calibrated date ranges between 335-324 BC and 202-107 BC; there have also been numerous paleographic and scribal dating studies placing ...


11

Does Vayikro (Leviticus) 19:34 suit? כְּאֶזְרָח מִכֶּם יִהְיֶה לָכֶם הַגֵּר | הַגָּר אִתְּכֶם וְאָהַבְתָּ לוֹ כָּמוֹךָ כִּי גֵרִים הֱיִיתֶם בְּאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם אֲנִי יְקוָֹק אֱלֹקיכֶם The stranger who sojourns with you shall be as a native from among you, and you shall love him as yourself; for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. I am ...


10

Judaism doesn't have a concept of defiling holy books in that sense. They have to be treated respectfully, but even if they weren't (and your case really isn't such an example) they don't lose their status.


9

The basic source is Deuteronomy 21:23, "You shall bury him on that day." (Whether it also applies to non-Jews is not so simple. The Ramban there mentions that Joshua took care to bury the bodies of the Canaanite kings (Joshua 10:27), though he says maybe that was more so as not to contaminate the land of Israel. Another relevant source is the long ...


8

Highly recommended is The Living Torah by the late Rabbi Arye Kaplan. It's translated into modern English - no thee, thy and thou. He brings numerous interpretations in the footnotes where available. He has broken each chapter into sub-chapters - each with its own heading. He brings lots of maps and charts and images. Apparently it's online here. ...


8

There are actually several places in the Pentateuch where this idea is mentioned, e.g.: Exodus 12:49 תּוֹרָה אַחַת יִהְיֶה לָאֶזְרָח וְלַגֵּר הַגָּר בְּתוֹכְכֶם - One law shall be to him that is native, and unto the sojourner that sojourneth among you. Leviticus 19:34 כְּאֶזְרָח מִכֶּם יִהְיֶה לָכֶם הַגֵּר הַגָּר אִתְּכֶם וְאָהַבְתָּ לוֹ ...


8

Just searching around in Torat Emet finds a few mentions of different months, in Tanach, besides for Adar: Nissan Esther 3:7 Nechemiah 2:1 Sivan Esther 8:9 Tammuz Yechezkel 8:14 (kidding) Elul Nechemiah 6:15 Kislev Nechemiah 1:1 Zechariah 7:1 Teves Esther 2:16 Shevat Zechariah 1:7 NB: This list may be incomplete.


8

The answer is there are few if any Biblical references. The afterlife is more emphasized in the oral tradition than in the actual Bible. Which is why you had the sadduccees (the priestly Jews who only believed in the first five books of the Bible with no oral tradition) who did not believe in an afterlife at all. To this day there are still many Jews who are ...


7

Three words in Tanach are tied for the longest word, at 11 letters each: וְהָאֲחַשְׁדַּרְפְּנִים in Esther 9:3, וּכְתוֹעֲבוֹתֵיהֶן in Yechezkel 16:47, and וְכַעֲלִילוֹתֵיכֶם in Yechezkel 20:44 (source).


7

For a Jewish translation of Nach (Tanach minus the Five Books of Moses) with a compendium of commentaries, I recommend the Judaica Press Prophets and Writings1. I have found that its English summary of commentaries on each verse reliably includes readable paraphrases or direct translations of the most interesting or useful comments of the classical ...


7

Chiram, the craftsman who designed much of the first Beis Hamikdash, was the son of a widow (1 Melachim 7:14). The woman from Tzorfas who hosted Eliyahu was a widow with a son (1 Melachim 17:9-24), and there's a Midrash (don't remember the location) that he grew up to be the prophet Yona Also the "wife of one of the disciples of the prophets" (2 Melachim ...


6

You might want to check out the ArtScroll Stone Chumash (no, it's not written on rocks). It contains all of the Torah in Hebrew with a translation, plus Rashi in Hebrew. But what really makes it good for you is the rest of the commentary. They anthologize a whole bunch of the classic Rabbinic commentaries, in English. They of course cite whoever they are ...


6

The Ibn Ezra (cited by the Malbim as being in Parshas Bo, but I assume he means to refer to his comments to Shemos 3:15) explains that ה' צבא-ות refers to Hashem being the upholder of the צבא השמים. The Radak to Yeshaya 6:3 says that it refers to the armies on High and below. The Malbim to Yeshaya 6:3 (you can see it here), in explaining the line ק' ק' ק' ...


6

It may be worth investigating Tzipora, the wife of Moshe Rabbeinu. She raised their sons without him between the time that he returned to Egypt at God's command and when Yitro brought her and the boys to join the Israelites in the desert (Exodus 18:1-4), which was either after the Exodus or after the Assembly at Sinai when the Torah was given. So, she ...


6

Our tradition believes in an Oral Torah which accompanies the Written Torah. Our Oral tradition describes that there are two parts of Jewish wisdom, described as Ma'aseh Bereishis and Ma'aseh Merkava - the account of creation and the account of G-d's divine chariot - which are not meant to be publicly expounded. The Mishna in Chagiga 2:1 states: אין ...


6

I think you are confusing theology with one of its sub components: doctrine/dogma. A systematised description of theology is only one approach to theology. In fact your comment (below the question) that the Christian New Testament does contain theology in the letters shows that your understanding of theology isn't broad enough: for Christians the Gospels are ...


6

In Melachim (Kings) Chapters 22-23, King Joshiahu discovers a Torah scroll during renovations of the Temple.


5

As noted in this answer, the Stone Chumash is a good starting point. It brings classical Jewish commentaries, verse by verse. This is one example of a category. A chumash is an edition of the five books of torah with (Jewish) commentaries. Lots of editors have published them; the commentaries included vary. (A book that included all the commentaries ...


5

Chida in Shem Hagedolim (page 7 of the file) quotes Seder Hadoros, who says that the commentary on Iyov isn't from Rashi. On that same page he also quotes someone who claims that none of the commentary on Neviim is from Rashi, although he disagrees with that.


5

There are four ways of writing a paragraph break in the Torah text: 1) xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 2) xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 3) ...


5

The Palestinian Talmud (Taanis 21a) states that there is only verse in which the Jewish people are referred to as Zion. The verse is in Isaiah 51, 16: וָאָשִׂים דְּבָרַי בְּפִיךָ וּבְצֵל יָדִי כִּסִּיתִיךָ לִנְטֹעַ שָׁמַיִם וְלִיסֹד אָרֶץ וְלֵאמֹר לְצִיּוֹן עַמִּי אָתָּה Here is the quote from the Talmud: א"ר חיננא בר פפא חוזרני על כל המקרא ולא מצאנו ...


5

A bit vague, but we'll give this a go: The "Torah" in the narrowest sense -- the Five Books of Moses -- we believe were dictated by God to Moses. The remainder of the Jewish Bible or Tanakh -- which roughly corresponds with what the Christians call the Old Testament -- signify works of religious value that had some Divine help. (E.g. Judges, Jeremiah, ...


5

Deut. 7:11 states: "You shall observe the commandment, and the decrees, and the ordinances, that I command you, today, to perform them." The Torah writes about Earthly rewards, and not a lot about the world to come (afterlife) or the resurrection (see further in Deut. Ch.7:12-etc.) One reason for this is the word "today" in Deut.7:11. The Torah is meant ...


4

It's a רש"י in שבת on Daf :י"ג that says: והספר. כל כתבי הקודש תורה נביאים וכתובים פוסלין תרומה במגען


4

The fifth chapter of Avos says one hallmark of a chacham, wise person, is that mode al haemes, he acknowledges the truth. Rashi says this refers to someone who has erred and acknowledges a correction.


4

Rambam, Laws of Mezuzah, Tefilin, and Sefer Torah, 7:16. ז,טו מותר לדבק תורה נביאים וכתובים בכרך אחד, ומניח בין כל חומש וחומש ארבע שיטין, ובין כל נביא ונביא שלוש שיטין, ובין כל נביא ונביא משנים עשר שלוש שיטין--שאם בא לחתוך, חותך. וסידורן של נביאים, כך הוא--יהושוע, ושופטים, שמואל, ומלכים, ירמיה, ויחזקאל, ישעיה, ותרי עשר; וסדר הכתובים--רות, ותילים, ...


4

Sure. Not veils, but other face coverings: David, after Avshalom's death: והמלך לאט את פניו (II Shmuel 19:5) Eliyahu at Har Chorev: וילט פניו באדרתו (I Melachim 19:13) Michayhu for his "playact" to Achav: ויתחפש באפר על עיניו (I Melachim 20:38) Yechezkel during his "playacting" of Tzidkiyahu's flight: פניך תכסה (Yechezkel 12:6), and Tzidkiyahu himself: ...


4

Nessa is certainly listed as a Jewish name here. But I cannot find it used in the Bible neither in my concordance (Even Shoshan) nor in an online concordance. Nes is a more masculine form and does exist in the Bible – Numbers 26 (10) and Isaiah 11 (10). My concordance lists its meaning as a “sign” (with miraculous associations) – see the translations. ...



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