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11

Yes, the Sadducees did believe they were Jewish. However, the confounding factor in the quotes you provide is probably this: That in many gemaras, because of medieval censors, "Christian" or rather "Min" (Christian sectarian) was replaced with "Sadducee". See for example the London manuscript of Yoma 56b that you cited above. I have drawn a red arrow to ...


10

Well, I'll just treat this as a programming assignment. If we use mechon-mamre's masoretic text without vowels; if we ignore punctuation and paragraph marks; if we use the ksiv and not kri (occasionally there's a note -- "the scroll will say this, but read that out-loud instead), I'm getting 135 such verses. A lot of them you'd expect to find repeated a lot, ...


9

First, I would suggest you read a bit about the history of the biblical text, its redaction, etc. It's important to understand the role played by the Masoretes in the making of the Masoretic texts which are used today, such as the Aleppo Codex. What is the source (talmudic or otherwise) for this concept? Traditionally, there were a number of different ...


9

The Midrash (Bereishis Rabba 37:7) explains why in the times of Tanach, people would come up with "new" names based on events surrounding the birth, whereas nowadays we name people after the previous generations: רבי יוסי אומר: הראשונים על ידי שהיו מכירים את ייחוסיהם היו מוציאין שמן לשם המאורע, אבל אנו שאין אנו מכירים את ייחוסינו, אנו מוציאין לשם ...


8

Concerning Og, see Numbers Raba Hukat 32: ... that no strong one in the world arose that that was more fierce than he, (קשה הימנו‏)... And he remained from the mighty ones who were killed by Amrafel and his friends, (Gen 14)... And he was a husk of them, like peels of olives in the olive waste. So from this saying, it would seem that Og was the ...


8

Usually if English-speaking Jews want a translation of the Jewish Bible they'll use a Jewish translation. As for exposure to the other part of "the Bible", i.e. the New Testament, my guess is some Jews who believe in extra exposure will have read bits of it in a survey course or the like. There's a huge range of degrees to which Jews are exposed to general ...


6

The traditional view: The Jewish Scripture, i.e. Tanakh, is made of 3 parts. The first part is the "Chumash", the five books of Moses. They were dictated word-by-word from G-d, and Moses wrote them down. (Now most of Deuteronomy is a big speech of Moses, but even so, after the fact that's what he was ordered to transcribe.) The last few verses describe ...


6

Habakkuk The prophet Habakkuk is thought to be the boy in the incident of Elisha and the Shunamite woman. Episode here: http://www.chabad.org/library/bible_cdo/aid/15910 The second line of his very short book starts "How long..." - your characteristic of impatience. The third line asks god "Why he shown him [iniquity]", - your characteristic of ...


5

Do English-speaking Jews read the Bible in English, or is that too Christian for them? First, English is not a Christian language. If anything, it's a pagan language, but really it's just a language. There are many translations of the Bible into English. Most are explicitly Christian. A handful are scholarly works (e.g., Everett Fox's translation). ...


5

I would offer three answers, which I believe may be true simultaneously. 1 While scribes were extremely careful for pesukim in Tanach, so as not to invalidate the kosher status of the sefer, they were not so careful when quoting pesukim when they occurred within the Gemara. Add to that that sometimes earlier manuscripts will shorten words or phrases with ...


5

R' Tzvi Hirsch Chayos in Mavo HaTalmud writes about various midrashic methodologies employed by Chazal in the Gemara and Midrash. In the twenty-first chapter, he discusses this tendency to identify a person mentioned in Tanach with someone else in Tanach, or to equate two names as belonging to the same person (e.g. "הוא מלאכי הוא עזרא"). Chayos treats this ...


5

Indeed, in a number of places here in Israel, Tehillim are read publicly on a daily basis from Tehillim scrolls written on parchment. According to many authorities, there is also a special bracha that is to be recited prior to reading material from Ketuvim out of a parchment scroll: ברוך אתה ה' א-להינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וציונו לקרוא בכתבי הקודש ...


4

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 14 discusses Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers). He says that the source for having Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers) is the Gemara Brachos 61a which discusses how Hashem was the Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers) for Adam Harishon. Then he mentions that the Minhag is that the parents are the Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers). He brings this in the name of Shaalos ...


4

In Biblical times a father could actually agree to marry off his daughter under the age of twelve-and-a-half. (Deuteronomy 22:16). By the times of the Talmud the recommendation had become "she must be grown-up enough to agree to marry the fellow." Yes, a previously-married woman is considered more "on her own" than the first time around. See for instance ...


4

"Is it the general belief that Nach is unchanged since it was written? " No. Nach is not as strictly recorded as the Torah is. The DeadSea scrolls for example show many variants on Nach. And you will notice in Nach many "corrections" marked in the mikrot gdolot. The differences between various versions of Nach are not extreme though. I.e. there is no ...


4

The ArtScroll edition of Chronicles (I and II), by Rabbi Moshe Eisenman, focuses on the idea that Kings is about what actually happened, while Chronicles is about the deeper meaning. That's why Chronicles often uses many names for one person, referring to his essence, not his real name. Also, Chronicles ends by explicitly stating that the exile was because ...


4

The Vilna Gaon on his commentary to the first blessing of Shemoneh Esrei (pg. 168 in Ishei Yisrael) says that the name א-ל refers to Hashem's existence as beyond and outside the world, a level to which we cannot relate: אל נאמר על אין סוף שמתפשט בלא צמצום אלו-הים, on the other hand, the Nefesh HaChaim (Shaar 3 Ch. 11) writes, refers to Hashem as the ...


4

Absolutely nothing! The reason the three pesukim are added at the beginning is so that we don't have to add at the end. To explain, consider Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 284: מפטירין בנביא מענינה של פרשה ואין פוחתין מכ"א פסוקים אלא אם כן סליק ענינא בבציר מהכי כגון עולותיכם ספו על זבחיכם. "We read the Haftarah from the Navi from the subject matter of ...


3

Chazal in many places say something like "the real name of x is y", followed by the question "so why was he called x?" - "to teach you something important about him that cannot be learned from his given name". The explanation of all this is that a person's given name is supposed to reflect his essential being, but some people do not 'live up to their name' ...


3

One aspect of the answer has nothing to do with the text of the tanach. It is a matter of the era of prophecy having been completed well before these 2 were born according to Judaism. See Talmud Bavli, Masechet Yoma, 9b 6 lines up from the bottom “After the later prophets, Haggai, Zecharia, and Malachi, had died, the prophetic spirit disappeared from the ...


3

There actually is a schedule, though nowadays it is not very well known. A full listing of the where each section in Nakh (the Prophets and Writings) begins can be found here. These sections, known as סדרים sedarim, are marked in old manuscripts of Tanakh with the letter ס. There are 295 such sections in the link above, leading many to beleive that this ...


3

As noted in the question, the torah is divided up into portions and read in its entirety over time (either one year or three years, depending on local practice). This is not true for the rest of the Tanakh; while parts are read on a regular basis, other parts are never read in synagogue (though they of course are studied in other contexts). Each weekly ...


3

I'll try to answer this question by quoting from Tov, E. (2001). Textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible. (2nd ed.). Minneapolis: Augsberg Fortress. In Tov's words: The Septuagint is a Jewish translation which was made mainly in Alexandria. Its Hebrew source differed greatly from the other textual witnesses (the Masoretic text, the Targumim, the Peshitta, ...


3

I have never heard of a restriction. Most (if not all) copies of Tanach I've seen are justified. In fact, copies of the Pentateuch that are written in the traditional style (handwritten on parchment, etc.) should be justified[1] (except that some sections should end mid-line) — but that rule doesn't apply to print, paper copies. Note, though, that, ...


3

Kings was edited by Jeremiah, the prophet serving during the time of the destruction of the first Temple, to frame things in a way that the people could see how they'd made the downward slide over the past few centuries, and how recently they'd just been circling the drain. The people had thought the Temple would always be around -- and then they needed to ...


3

The first Tanach person who comes to my mind when you say "curiosity" is none other than Moses. The famous "burning bush" scene turns on his turning from his course to investigate a strange phenomenon: וַיֵּרָא מַלְאַךְ יְהֹוָה אֵלָיו בְּלַבַּת אֵשׁ מִתּוֹךְ הַסְּנֶה וַיַּרְא וְהִנֵּה הַסְּנֶה בֹּעֵר בָּאֵשׁ וְהַסְּנֶה אֵינֶנּוּ אֻכָּל An angel of ...


2

if your question is can the torah be wrong then the orthodox will tell you no and conservative and reform may vary from rabbi to rabbi if your asking can the torah be taken not as face value in regard to historical events even in orthodoxy its a mater of gr8 controversy with many strong-worded tshuvos and strongly-held opinions my personal belief is that ...


2

Two answers that were given here: (a) The Gemara later (55a) says that if one refrains from reading the Torah when he is called upon to read, this "shortens one's days and years." If he prepares the Parshah two times, he becomes sufficiently familiar with the words and is able to read from the Torah in the event that he is called upon. He thereby avoids ...


2

To kind of restate @Gershon Gold's answer in the spirit of the question, the biblical source for the idea of escorting the Bride was G-d's escorting Eve to Adam. Genesis 2:22 states: וַיְבִאֶהָ אֶל הָאָדָם -- and He brought her to the man.


2

The term "literal" and its Hebrew or English counter-parts are not terms with hard and fast meanings so any discussion must necessarily be careful to clarify how the terms are being used in the immediate context. Generally "literal" meaning refers to the apparent meaning that the reader would reasonably be expected to take away from it. This can also be ...



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