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32

In short the answer is Yes. Maimonides (also know as the Rambam) codifies 13 principles which are basic to Judaism. These principles are pretty much universally accepted as binding in all Orthodox forms of Judaism. Principle number 8 is, "The belief in the divine origin of the Torah." Principle number 9 is, "The belief in the immutability of the Torah." ...


28

The Jewish scriptures are called the "Tanach", which is traditionally divided into 24 separate books. It is hard to say exactly how it measures up to the Christian Old Testament, since there are different versions as to what is included in the Old Testament depending on what sect of Christianity one belongs to. Here is an excellent chart which shows the ...


21

1) Didnt Moshe Rabbeinu get divorced from Zipporah? See Rashi Bamidar 12:1, על אודות האשה: על אדות גירושיה. Sounds like he divorced her. I dont think this shittah is universal though. Still looking for more sources. Tosafos in Yevomos 62:a dichsiv says that possibly he wrote her a Get. 2) Pirkei d’Rabbi Eliezer (chapter 30) brings down the following story ...


17

In the Haftorah of Parshas Ki Sisa (Malachim Aleph 18:20-39) when Eliyahu is on Har HaCarmel and he is waiting for the priests of Baal, he watches them as they pray to their god to rain fire upon their sacrifice. When none is forthcoming, Eliyahu tells them (verse 27) to "Call with a loud voice, for he is a god. [Perhaps] he is talking or he is pursuing ...


15

The Hebrew Bible is most commonly referred to as "Tanach", which is a transliteration of a 3-letter Hebrew acronym for the 3 parts it contains: (ת) T orah, (נ) N'vi'im, (כ) K'suvim.


15

See this summary on Wikipedia. The first five books of the Bible -- Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Deuteronomy -- form the "Torah" (like would be in a Torah scroll). The text of these is, as far as I know, identical between Jewish and Christian Bibles (though there will certainly be differences in translation; studying the original Hebrew is extremely ...


15

According to Radak (Yehoshua 1:1), this is grammatically proper for "ben" to become "bin" when it and the following word are small and connected together in speech. Other examples where "ben" becomes "bin": דִּבְרֵי אָגוּר בִּן יָקֶה הַמַּשָּׂא (Mishlei 30:1) וְהָיָה אִם בִּן הַכּוֹת הָרָשָׁע (Devarim 25:2) שֶׁבִּן לַיְלָה הָיָה וּבִן לַיְלָה אָבָד (Yonah ...


15

עתניאל בן קנז ועכסה בת כלב — see Judges 1:13 EDIT: I found some more: יואש מלך יהודה ויהועדן - See Kings II 14:2 אחז מלך יהודה ואבי בת-זכריה - See Kings II 18:2 חזקיהו מלך יהודה וחפצי-בה - See Kings II 21:1 מנשה מלך יהודה ומשלמת בת חרוץ - See Kings II 21:19


14

Abarbanel offers two possible approaches: 1) "לא יסור שבט" does not mean the monarchy, but rather that Yehuda will always be inherently greater and more deserving of respect and leadership than the other tribes. 2) "לא יסור שבט" means that the tribe of Yehuda will be punished continuously throughout their exile (שבט as in "שבט אפי"), referring to the galus ...


14

There is a commandment in the Torah for each person to write for themselves a sefer torah, though most people nowadays rely on their contribution to the writing of a communal Torah at their synagogues. Besides for this, there is a Rabbinically enacted obligation for the community to have a weekly Torah reading, and each person is individually obligated to ...


14

The JPS 1917 translation is public domain. It can be found at http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0.htm among other places.


14

There are the following others: אביהיל and אבישור (I Chron. 2:29) מעכה and מכיר (ibid. 7:16) שלחו אותם and שחרים (ibid. 8:8, according to Radak, Metzudos and Malbim) יהושבעת and יהוידע (II Chron. 22:11)


13

When you speak of the Neviim and Kesuvim of being factually accurate, you are likely referring to the historical accounts of what is written in those sections of the Tanach, most of which take place in the historical books of the Neviim. The classical commentators (of course, I cannot speak for all of them) understand the books of the Neviim to have been ...


12

Minchas Shai (to Gen. 30:18, the first place where the name appears) cites Radak, who says that it this is an example of elision: the sound of the second letter is combined into that of the first. As another example, he gives מחצצרים (I Chron. 15:24 and in a few other places in Chronicles), where the second צ is silent. That said, as Yahu noted, there are ...


12

In his commentary to I Kings 6:7: ומקבות" - דלוט"א בלשון רוסיא" Although it seems quite likely that this is a later interpolation; it doesn't appear in early prints of Rashi. In several places, though, Rashi refers to לשון כנען, which was a popular term at the time for the Slavic languages (based on the equation of "Slav" with "slave" and the ...


12

In Tanach there are only four: Aviv = first month = Nissan (Ex. 13:4, et al) Ziv = second month = Iyar (I Kings 6:1) Eisanim = seventh month = Tishrei (ibid. 8:2) Bul = eighth month = (Mar)cheshvan (ibid. 6:38) In a letter from the era of the first Beis Hamikdash found in Arad, there is mention (according to some reconstructions) of ירח צח, "the month ...


12

You mentioned this verse in passing, but as far as I can tell, it provides complete and convincing proof that G-d is known by multiple names. Exodus 6:2-3, from Mechon Mamre: וַיְדַבֵּר אֱלֹהִים, אֶל-מֹשֶׁה; וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלָיו, אֲנִי יְהוָה. וָאֵרָא, אֶל-אַבְרָהָם אֶל-יִצְחָק וְאֶל-יַעֲקֹב--בְּאֵל שַׁדָּי; וּשְׁמִי יְהוָה, לֹא נוֹדַעְתִּי לָהֶם ...


12

The only divorce I can find in Tanach al pi peshat is Avraham's divorcing Hagar. The verse (Genesis 21:10) says: גָּרֵשׁ הָאָמָה הַזֹּאת, וְאֶת-בְּנָהּ Cast out this bondwoman and her son. The word used is גרש which is the word used for divorce generally in Tanach (eg. Leviticus 22:13) and it seems to be the peshat here because we never hear of Hagar ...


12

I suggest Ishei Hatanach / Encyclopedia Of Biblical Personalities Anthologized from the Talmud, Midrash, and Rabbinic writings by Yishai Chasidah. It's an Artscroll product.


11

There are no restrictions on having your own copy of the bible and it is common in almost all Jewish homes. The term "bible" in English, in a Jewish context, refers either to The Torah, a.k.a. the Pentateuch, also known as the Five Books of Moses. The Tanakh, which adds the books of the prophets and additional "Writings", known to Christians collectively ...


11

The dictionary defines inerrancy as "freedom from error", in which case, yes, the Torah has inerrancy. One of the cardinal beliefs of Judaism, according to the Rambam, is that God composed the Pentateuch; the others sorta imply he has inerrancy; combined, then, we get that according to the Rambam the Pentateuch has inerrancy. I have no source at the moment ...


11

Aruch Hashulchan (Orach Chaim 285:2) suggests that it is in commemoration of the three times that the generalities and the specifics (כללות ופרטות) of the Torah were repeated (Sotah 37b): once at Sinai, once by Hashem speaking to Moshe from the Tent of Meeting, and a third time by Moshe in the plains of Moav. The reason for doing the Targum one time, he ...


11

A core belief of Judaism is that there is only one God. This is a bad translation. The Hebrew is: אֲנִי-אָמַרְתִּי, אֱלֹהִים אַתֶּם; וּבְנֵי עֶלְיוֹן כֻּלְּכֶם.‏ The word אֱלֹהִים can mean "God". It can also mean Judge, Idolatrous god/power (note the distinction between God and gods), Important Person. In this context, others translate it as ...


11

All three books (Iyov Mishlei and Tehillim) are written in a complex poetic style. The separate trop represents the shift from prose to poetry and may have been sung in a more songful manner than the regular prose trop. A proof to this distinction lies in Iyov, whose first, second and final chapters are written in prose and have regular trop. EDIT: The ...


11

Very conveniently, the answer lies plainly in one verse. VaYikra (Leviticus) 19:17 states, "Do not hate your brother in your heart; you surely must rebuke your neighbor, but you must not bear sin because of him." (My own translation) Rashi there states: "but You shall not bear a sin on his account: I.e., [in the course of your rebuking your fellow,] do not ...


11

I found this website online: http://www.tanakhprofiles.org/showentries.php.


11

Yes, the Sadducees did believe they were Jewish. However, the confounding factor in the quotes you provide is probably this: That in many gemaras, because of medieval censors, "Christian" or rather "Min" (Christian sectarian) was replaced with "Sadducee". See for example the London manuscript of Yoma 56b that you cited above. I have drawn a red arrow to ...


11

I think the most complete indexing book of that kind is תורה הכתובה והמסורה by אהרן הימן. It's published by דביר in three volumes. It goes through the whole Bible verse by verse, giving for each verse a list of locations in Talmud and Midrash where the verse is mentioned in some way. It's available on HebrewBooks: vol 1 (torah) vol 2 (nevi'im) vol 3 ...


10

Well you have to remember that in those days houses were not quite like they are today. The floors were earthen and they (the houses) were generally only 1 story high. So the simplest way to get into a house is to dig under the wall. Going through the front door is problematic: a) it's in a location where it's super-easy for the owner to notice (squeak) b) ...



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