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2

Who says it's all that life-threatening in most cases? See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_swimming#Health_risks: Winter swimming isn't dangerous for healthy persons, but should be avoided by individuals with heart or respiratory diseases, obesity, high blood pressure and arrhythmia, as well as children and the elderly. Before modern medicine, ...


5

It seems that if danger is involved, then one may not dip in frozen water, as you can see in the answer here: בארץ קרה מאוד בטרק נידח, לבד, טבילה בקרח היא לא על גבול סכנת הנפשות?!‏ אם זה כך, אין לטבול ואין לחיות חיי אישות עד שמגיעים למקום שניתן לטבול בבטחה. אך אמותנו הקדושות נהגו לטבול במים קרים מאד בגלות, ולא כל כך בטוח שזו סכנה כמו אי ...


13

Excrement and urine of a live animal (and in fact anything except an entire limb from a live animal) are not ritually impure, and thus don't affect your hat. (Rambam Avot HaTumah 2:3) As an aside, excrement and urine of a deceased animal (as opposed to its flesh) also are not ritually impure. (ibid. 1:15)


0

When taharah was a priority stone kelim were used. So for example in the preparation of the ashes of the red heifer, Mishna Poroh 3(2) ומביאין שוורים, ועל גביהן דלתות, ותינוקות יושבין על גביהן, וכוסות של אבן בידם And oxen were brought, and on their backs [were laid] doors on top of which sat children with cups of stone in their hands. But for ...


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Non-kohanim couldn't use pottery that had terumah cooked in it, whether it was tamei or not. Kohanim ate terumah, which had to be kept tahor, so they used either stone which couldn't become tamei, or pottery which was harder to become tamei (only from the inside). But once the pottery became tamei, it had to be thrown out because then it couldn't be used for ...


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Many implements that we've excavated in the homes of Kohanim were stone. But you're correct -- they absolutely could and did use brand-new clay pots, and then discard them if they became tamei. This was especially prevalent for cooking sacrificial meat; see for instance Leviticus 6:21.


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It's not really that the law has changed; it's just that it's become rather moot. The problem was that people would store their holy scrolls (Torah or other parts of Nach) with the "holy food" in the house, i.e. the tithes that had to be given to a Kohen. The problem is that pests eating the food would damage the scrolls. The rabbis therefore decreed that ...


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I asked this question to a rabbi last week. He said that people used to store their torahs in the safest, most water resistant part of their dwelling- the pantry. Apparently scrolls were being damaged by rats in the pantry so they made this decree so people would find the mixture of food and scrolls repugnant. Apparently tosafos says this.


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In actuality the halacha still applies today. This law can be found in the Shulchan Aruch Chapter 147, section 1 and is derived from the Talmud, tractate Megilla 32a. We can see the discussion in Megillah 7a - Kisvei HaKodesh Making Your Hands Tamei Where does this halacha of kisvei hakodesh being metamei come from and why? Rashi references the sugya ...


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This is a machloket in Chulin 31a. נדה שנאנסה וטבלה אמר רב יהודה אמר רב טהורה לביתה ואסורה לאכול בתרומה ור' יוחנן אמר אף לביתה לא טהרה A nidah who did not intend to tovel (will be explained later): Rav Yehudah said in the name of Rav that she is pure for "her house" (i.e. to be with her husband), but still isn't able to eat trumah. Rabi Yochanan ...



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