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The author of בכור שור is Rabbi Alexander Sender Schor (1673-1737), author of Simlah Chadasha. He wrote בכור שור on many masechtos of Shas, including Kiddushin. All of בכור שור may be found in this sefer; the commentary to Kiddushin starts on page 444. I checked the first comment on דף ב, and it seems to match the commentary quoted in the ילקוט מפרשים.


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I ran Google translate on ברר which means "find out" and ברור which means "clear". Your description of the activity falls between these two explanations, as it appears that you're doing both. You're exploring the halacha as well as attempting to clarify how halacha clarifies the decisions made. Tough call on this - perhaps "Halachic investigation", ...


5

The Kaf HaChaim writes in Yoreh Deah siman 116 number 149 "a woman that begins to nurse her son should begin nursing from the left breast first". He writes that his source is the Tzava'as Rebbe Yehudah HaChasid #69 and the sefer Shmiras HaNefesh #17. The sefer Mishnas Yehoshua footnote #18 (on the linked page) mentions that according to the sefer Shmiras ...


1

See Pri Tzadik Chelek Aleph on the first chapter on Chanukah (page 136 in the more common edition: http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=21327&st=%D7%97%D7%A0%D7%95%D7%9B%D7%94&pgnum=235&hilite=27a5da15-dd79-4acf-bae5-d529fa949c80) He asks the question why are the laws of Chanukah discussed in the Talmud in Shabbos and rather one would ...


3

The word "peley" is probably פלא, which means it is a "wonder" or something amazing or incredible. It often refers to something being very surprising in its novelty. I assume Daniel is correct about "navamina"


6

I'm not sure what you mean by "peley", but I imagine that the phrase you are hearing as "navamina" is actually "hava amina," which means "what one would have thought". For example, the Gemara might state a fact that seems obvious, and the person leading the shiur might ask, "What's the hava amina?" In other words, why did the gemara have to say that? What ...


6

Cholek comes from the same word as machloket. "He is cholek" means "he argues". Chozer means to retract, so "he is chozer" means "he retracts [his opinion]". Modeh means, in this context, to agree. "He is modeh": he agrees. Gozer is similar to gezera. A gezera is a decree meant to prevent people from coming close to a sin. So, "he is gozer" means "he ...


4

In Tanya Chapter 5, this question is discussed. There it's explained that Torah is Chochmas Hashem - Hashem's Wisdom, and therefor learning any Torah is an intense union/connection with Hashem. Understanding His Wisdom is valuable in its own right, regardless of whether it's relevant or not. (See the quote below for more elaboration). דרך משל: כשאדם מבין ...


5

The Talmud asks a very similar question, on Sanhedrin 71a: אלא לא היה ולא עתיד להיות ולמה נכתב דרוש וקבל שכר [...] תניא, עיר הנדחת לא היתה ולא עתידה להיות ולמה נכתבה דרוש וקבל שכר [...]תניא בית המנוגע לא היה ולא עתיד להיות ולמה נכתב דרוש וקבל שכר However, this [the Ben Sorrer Umoreh, the rebellious son of Deut. 21:18] never happened, and never ...


5

In some Yeshivos, they deliberately choose Masechtas that are the least practical, as they understand this to be the best manifestation of Torah Lishma - learning Torah just for the sake of learning Torah, and not for any other purpose. I believe this is one of the reasons that Brisker Yeshivos learn Kodshim.


5

In every tractate, there are parts that are "practical" either directly or indirectly. I'll explain by examples: The first two tractate I learned was Bava Metzi'ah . It talks about two people holding a tallit and arguing about who gets what. OK, How often do 2 people argue about who gets a tallit, unless it's in shul (and then, the SHUL owns the tallit - ...


1

I'm not sure where i heard this, but part of it is in expectation and hope of when it will once again be relevant to us, bimheira b'yameinu. Also, the Gemara deals with much more than the specific topic it's about, including tangential laws, sayings, stories (agadah), etc.


5

דָּחוּק = dachuk. This is a Hebrew past participle meaning "strained" or "forced". It can also be used to mean "implausible". Examples in Yeshivish: I. That explanation is so dachuk ! is equivalent to That explanation is so forced! II. He tried to be metaretz Rabbi Akiva Eiger's kasha on the Taz, but his s'vara was dachuk. is equivalent ...


7

The word "dochak" means forced (duchka d'sakina, for example, means the pressure (force) applied by a knife). It usually means that an opinion does not fit so smoothly, either in the reading of the words or in logical follow-through, into the discussion at hand.


7

The words you're actually hearing are "man de'amar", or מאן דאמר in Aramaic. "Man" here actually has the same meaning in Aramaic as in English - man. "D'amar" is like the Hebrew שאמר. Translated, it means "who says". The whole phrase together means "the [first/second] one who says". It's often used as a noun when talking about different opinions - "this ...


2

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains this here as follows: The playing represents the Supernal enjoyment from souls that connect the world with G-dliness (לויתן related to הפעם ילוה את אישתי - meaning connection), pleasure here meaning to emphasize the novelty of the matter, like the enjoyment one gets from seeing a parrot talking, even though it isn't able to ...


6

IIRC, the Maharal, in Beer Hagoleh ch. 4, explains that the Leviathan is a symbol for the world's great materialism (as it's an enormous mass of flesh-life), and 'playing' is something that may be a source of enjoyment without fulfilling a need. Thus, God is described as playing with earthly materialism, because He doesn't need anything from His creations. ...


6

The Talmud gets it from Tehillim 104:26: שָׁם, אֳנִיּוֹת יְהַלֵּכוּן; לִוְיָתָן, זֶה-יָצַרְתָּ לְשַׂחֶק-בּוֹ. "There go the ships; there is leviathan, whom Thou hast formed to sport therein." In Canaanite myth, the Leviathan (Lotan) is a dangerous creature whom Baal must slay. Thus: he name of a mythological sea serpent or dragon, personifying the ...


5

I think the real answer is that he meant 15b. ויהי בימי שפוט השופטים. דור ששופט את שופטיו. אמר לו טול קיסם מבין עיניך. אומר לו טול קורה מבין עיניך. אמר לו כספך היה לסיגים. אמר לו סבאך מהול במים. And it was in the days of the judges judging. The generation was judging the judges. The judge would say remove a twig from between your eyes, the person would ...


3

אין אדם רואה חוב אצל עצמו. כתובות קה ע׳ב. This is in a few other places in ש׳ס too.


2

Mishna Negaim 2:5 כל הנגעים אדם רואה חוץ מנגעי עצמו also in Ran Nedarim 8b seventh wide line



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