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6

The Torah commands to attach tassels (or "fringes") to the edges of any four-cornered garments we must wear; however this only applies during the day, not night. This makes it a "yes-do" command that's limited in time. The rule of thumb for this category of commandments (which also includes shofar, lulav, and the like) is that women aren't obligated in them; ...


6

There is much discussion in Jewish literature about this subject, and there is also a difference between a woman wearing a tallit and tefillin. It is easy to show what the Gemara and the Rema say, but leaving out all of the rishonim and acharonim on the topic would prevent learning where the halakha stands. But here is a start. Regarding tefillin Mishna ...


5

Don't worry about it. The practice of not bringing a Tallit into a bathroom is a strong custom (because the Tallit is a garment designated for prayer times, as opposed to the undergarment tallit katan which we do bring into the bathroom), but not technically a law. This is why you can make the blessing on it, then have in mind to remove it, use the restroom, ...


5

The Mishna Brurah 8:4 brings the Bach who holds one should cover the heads with the tallis which brings yiras shamayim.The Mishna Brurah in hilchos hikon tefillah(I think siman 91,or 90,he brings that one should cover his face with the tallis during shemoneh esri.There are numerous sources which say to cover the head with a tallis.The Ben Ish Chai in Hilchos ...


4

Excellent question. Greetings and welcome to J.SE! German and Sephardic Jewish men begin wearing a Tallis many years before marriage; the question if anything is why those of Eastern European ancestry wait until marriage. I'm told that once a man gets married and starts wearing a Tallis, the practice (I wouldn't say "must", but certainly "normative ...


4

I've shared your reaction in the past. Interestingly enough, it seems that Posekim in the last century (who disapproved of women wearing one at all) preferred that if a woman were to wear one, she wear one that is distinctively feminine in its design. I cannot pull all the necessary sources at the moment, but the basics are as follows: The Shulhan 'Aruch ...


3

This is an interesting question because there is the Shalom Bayis reason(from the Tamei Minhagim) and also the Magen Avraham who brings the Mahril who folded his talis motzei shabbas. However, the Ben Ish Chai parshas Noach 16 writes that one should be careful not to leave his talis unfolded overnight(which seems one can fold his fellows talis) but he then ...


3

Yes. You can fold his tallis. Folding your neighbors tallis will protect it from damage. Forget about segulah. You have an obligation to protect your neighbors property, particularly when it costs you nothing to do so! Here is a source for the obligation to protect others' property Aruch Hashulchan, Choshen Mishpat 259:17 – One must try to prevent any type ...


2

I recommend that you discuss your own situation and best course of action with your rabbi. I posed this question, regarding my own entry into the techeilet world, to Rabbi Jack Bieler in Silver Spring. If I recall correctly, he told me that if I only felt I could afford one set of strings, I should go ahead and put them on one garment, and that whether that ...


2

Since you are not halachically Jewish, you have no commandment in tzitzit. (The tallit is just the vehicle for tzitzit, which you probably already know.) To you, therefore, your grandfather's tallit is just a garment. It isn't restricted to him or to Jews; if you were to don it privately you wouldn't be doing damage. (I don't have a source for this; it's ...


2

See לוח עזרת תורה in the name of Horav Henken OBM where he permits the early Minyanim to put on Talis & Tefillin after Alois. My assumption is that it is derived from the Halacha that one who walking (not riding) may put on Tefillin before Mesheyakir (see SA Siman 30:3) and as far as Talis see Siman 18:3 in Ramah that if one puts on Talis after Alois the ...


1

A chupa is not always a talis: other cloths are used also. But we do find that something used for one mitzva should be used for another (e.g. Nit'e Gavriel, Arbaas Haminim, chapter 61, paragraph 2), which may explain why people use a talis for a chupa. Another reason may be that it's a readily accessible large square cloth that doesn't look inappropriate.


1

the stripes are not "needed" they are a Minhag. accordingly, talisim were not origionally striped. I take the liberty to guess that manufactures of todays talisim with techeileit that have stripes as well, are simply producing it according to peoples perceptions of what a talis should look like. In regard to the color, i'ts interesting to note the the ...


1

The Taz in hilchos tzitzis says that we wear a yarmulke even when the tallis is covering the head in case the tallis slips off. It would seem that if not for that concern, one would take off their yarmulke when wearing a tallis, and there is no need for a double head covering. There are poskim who require atifas harosh (surrounding the head, not just ...


1

The custom was once that the talis was the main garment a man wore. While that is obviously not the case anymore, we do wear a talis katan (small talis) to keep the mitzva of tzitzis with us the whole day. (It is a shmira - reminder or spiritual protection against forbidden relations.) However, it is highly questionable if a regular talis katan1 fulfils the ...


1

He should not make a b'racha on the borrowed talis-gadol. If he will later that day get his own talis-gadol, he should then put his own on with b'racha, as if it had been tisha b'av. Regarding the talis-katan, it depends on several disagreements among authorities, and therefore goes accordig to the person-in-questions's accepted shitos: If he holds that ...


1

The custom of the Teimanin (Yemenites) is to wear a tallis for Friday night prayers. (And I was told by my Teimani neighbor that also when they visit a friend on Shabbos they wear a tallis). But despite this being an old, established custom, many Teimanim who came to Eretz Yisrael have abandoned it, apparently so as not to be different from other Jewish ...


1

Actually there are others who were concerned over the issue, which, as SethJ notes above, is referred to as notef al hakanaf, meaning it should hang down along the side, not from the bottom. The Chazon Ish held that you should tie the first knot really snug so that it bunches up the fabric, and that way the tzitzit won't budge. You see a lot of avreichim ...



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