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10

First of all, welcome. The top of your tallit has the blessing. With nikkud (the vowelization), it reads: בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה ה׳ אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם אֲשֶר קִדְּשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו, וְצִוָּנוּ לְהִתְעַטֵּף בַּצִּיצִת Translation: Blessed are you, Eternal, our G-d, King of the Universe, Who has sanctified us with your Commandments and commanded ...


5

Yes, you can wear a Tallis/Tzitzis since the Tallis itself has no holyness, it is just an instrument of a Mitzva (תשמישי מצווה) furthermore, the fear for companionship with a Jew (שמא יתלווה לישראל בדרך) is also not relevant since we are talking about a proselyte who intends to join Kehal Hashem. See further info in details in Mishnat Hager (Ch. 1, 32). ...


3

If someone is wearing a four cornered garment without Kosher Tzitzit (and missing one corner invalidates the whole thing (OC 13:1)), they must either tie on Kosher Tzitzit or take it off. (On Shabbat, of course, the former action is impossible.) If taking it off right there would cause serious embarrassment, the Rama (OC 13:3) allows one to remain with it ...


3

If the Talis would be a very thick material which does not flop over when held up, it would be Ohel. This is the way the Taz (and similarly the Magen Avraham) explain the opinion of the rishonim brought in siman 301 siff 40. They are subsequently brought in later achronim like Mishna Berurah 151. The Taz 27 specifically mentions Atifa, and the Magen ...


2

Stripes on Tallis states that the Pri Megadim stated that the custom was to use blue in his tim (mid to late 1700's). Apparently both customs were extant long before. I saw an article that Yigal Yadin found stripes on taleisim (like today) at Matzada but I lost the reference and do not recall if he mentioned the colors. Peri Megadim (Eshel Avraham 9:6) ...


2

The main difference between the two is size. The Rashab Tallis is significantly wider. Ben's Tallit shop says it is the widest that he sells ("even wider than a size 90 Yemenite Tallit"). It is therefore significantly more expensive because it has the extra material. It is a recent thing to have such variations marketed at all. There are slight variations ...


2

The concept is to fulfill all opinions concerning the concept of being completely wrapped (עטיפה גמורה) by the talit. This is being wrapped at least at the time of the blessing completely around the head and the majority of the body, after the custom of the children of Yishmael. This subject can be found, for example, in Shulchan Aruch HaRav, Orach Chaim, ...


2

The Mishna Brurah 8:4 writes at the end: משמע בגמרא שבחור לא היה מכסה ראשו בטלית אפילו הוא ת"ח Loose translation : it seems from the gemara that an unmarried person shouldn't cover their head with a tallis even if they are a great Torah Scholar. This seems to be the overwhelming custom of Ashkenazim. For Sefardim it seems that it is encouraged to do so ...


2

Bottom line it depends what you're putting it on for. From Dose of Halacha: ..The Mishna Berura (14:11) writes that when one borrows a friend’s Tallis to Daven for the Amud, one should make a Bracha. The Aruch Hashulchan (OC 91:2) and Kaf Hachaim (OC 147:4) write that one who receives an Aliya (or any other Kibbud) should wear a Tallis out of respect for ...


1

The Mechaber writes that clothing whose corners are leather (a material not Mechuyav in Tzitzis) while the rest is from cloth, is Mechuyav in Tzitzis, and the opposite is Patur. The Maggen Avraham writes that this is because we look at the majority of the cloth's makeup. This Halachah is based on the Mishnah in Kla'im, which says that regarding Shatnez ...


1

Assuming that your question asks in general, if one who has already made a blessing earlier in the day on either the tallit katan or the tallit gadol, the answer is in Shulchan Aruch OC 8. He states that whenever there is a hefsek (interruption), one must make a new bracha on the tallit. I think Magen Avraham does mention a possible exception regarding the ...


1

Perhaps the main function of the tallith gadol is as a beged meyuchad l'tefilla (a garment designated for prayer), as a sign of respect when we stand before the King (see e.g. Orach Chaim 91:2; see also Taz Orach Chaim 21:3 cited by the Aruch HaShulchan OC 21:6 who for this reason disallowed its wearing into an outhouse; See also Taz OC Yoreh Deah 283:3 who ...


1

The Minhag of my family going back more than 100 years is indeed to use a Tallit. I don't know the source, but we come back from Shklov in Lita.


1

i asked Rav Avraham Osdoba he told me he does not see why not, so yes it is permitted


1

Here is a link that shows you the Munkaczer pattern.


1

As the other answers indicate, the scarf way to wear it happened in certain other communities as other times. I haven't seen any point of connection between the modern practice and these isolated instances. The most likely origin of the Ashkenazi Reform/Conservative way of wearing it as a scarf is the imitation of the Christian Stole. The Reform synagogue, ...


1

my inkling is to say you should not stop wearing it based on the idea of maalin bakodesh v'ein yaridin (one goes up in holiness but no down) The idea being that once you accept upon yourself wearing a tallis you wouldn't stop. Not the same but related is a divorced man or a widow would not stop wearing his tallis.



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