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Once the Roman government issued a decree forbidding Torah study. Papus ben Yehudah saw Rabbi Akiva conducting Torah classes and asked him, “Do you not fear punishment by law?” Rabbi Akiva answered with a parable: A fox was strolling along the riverbank and noticed fish swimming swiftly from place to place. He asked, “Why are you running?” They ...


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In the society of those days, rape or seduction would usually happen only if the woman was somewhere outside of her house. Rashi in Devarim 22:23 says, "A man finds her in the city - if she had stayed at home, this wouldn't have happened." And in the city we assume it's seduction unless she cries out (Rambam, Hilchos Naara Besula 1:2), and it would be even ...


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One should perform a mitzva solely because G-d has commanded him to perform it, even if one does not understand why. Thus, Ramba"m Mishnah Torah, Torah study ch. 1 cites sources for the mitzvah. He also explains that one of the main reasons is to be able to teach your children what to do. Perhaps this sounds "circular", but, it's not. Related to Emilio's ...


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"I have created the yetzer hara (evil inclination), and I created the Torah as its antidote" (Kidushin 30b)


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The sages say that גדול תלמוד שמביא לידי מעשה (kiddushin 40b) this can be understood in the technical way, which makes perfect sense, you cannot fulfil the mitzvoth if you don't know what to do, and you never end, there's always more to it. But I understand that statment also in the 'emotional' way. let me explain. Once a person asked the Chazon Ish if he ...


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most likely the verse has nothing to do with a literal dog, but rather a male temple prostitute that was called a dog priest - they actually practiced sodomy in the temple as a male prostitute (they also had females doing the same) - the profits for thier services was given to the temple until they began claiming they could forgive sins through thier sexual ...


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Tevilat keilim is a separate mitzva (neither directly related to kashrut nor to tumah) that is most plausibly compared to the ritual immersion of a person who commits himself to the service of G-d by joining the Jewish people. In a similar vein, a utensil that originally had been owned by a non-Jew, when it now is "consecrated" for use by the "mamlechet ...


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The Tur (orach chaim 291) quotes an opinion that 2 loaves are unnecessary for the third meal. The explanation offered is that from the double portion of Friday, four loaves were made. One was consumed on Friday itself, one was consumed on Friday night, and one was consumed at the first daytime meal. This means that only one loaf remained for the third meal. ...


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[excuse my English, I am not native to it] It is only reasonable that we will remember the Manna's extra portion on every meal that is being had thanks to it. BTW, according to some, such as Ha'ARI Hakadosh, you should make the blessing on 12 loafs (instead of the common 2). And another BTW, according to some, as portrayed in the Mekhilta de-Rabbi ...


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See the Aruch Hashulchan או"ח רעד-ג: who quotes the Maharshal who had the practice to use one loaf at night and two loafs by day, for the honor of the day is greater than the honor of the night. However, the practice had become in accordance with the opinion of the Vilna Gaon that we use two loafs at every meal. והמהרש''ל נהג בלילה לבצוע אחד וביום שני ...



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