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1

There are minor pieces subject to tearing (like the techeles strands of the tzitz and the ephod), but those are easily replaced and aren't intrinsic to the remainder of the beged. Most of the other begadim of the Kohen Gadol contain metal strands or are actually made of metal, making them difficult to "tear" - you would have to cut them. The other begadim ...


0

Ibn Ezra writes: כי הוא דרך בזיון על כן אמר כי תועבת ה For it is an embarrassment, therefore it is written "for it is an abomination of God." Kli Yakar writes: לפי שגם הכלבים עזי נפש מזנים בפרהסיא...והרי שניהם שוים בזנות ובעזות Because dogs also are brazen, in that they are promiscuous in public...therefore, the two of them (the ...


1

To make the question stronger, the Rambam writes (Hilchos Akum 2:1) that the primary belief of idolaters was/is that G-d is in charge and the idolatry gets its power from Him. So, if we still believe that G-d is the Boss, what's the problem? I once heard an explanation that the problem is that if you have an intermediary, all you will care about is what ...


0

I do not yet have sources for this; but, having considered some implications of idolatrous belief, I will pose an answer. Idolatry ("'Avodah Zarah" in Hebrew) stems from the belief that HaShem (the Jewish concept of G-d) is limited and shares power/dominion over Creation with other entities. If this were true, H"V, it would result in neither deity having ...


0

It may be possible that in the light of new scientific research, perhaps involving genetic engineering, pork eating will be allowed. In particular, a company called Modern Meadow is a working on producing synthetic meat. Tests with engineered comestible ground beef have been successful; in case pork is produced through a similar process, there is no animal ...


3

No, pigs will not be kosher food, not even when pigs learn to fly -- well, at least not until the Messiah comes or science finds a way to change the pig from a pig into something else a bit different. The Torah prohibits animals that can be eaten based on physical characteristics. Leviticus 11:1-32. A kosher animal among mammals must have a cloven hoof ...


1

There is a Midrash (Shocher Tov 146 I think) referenced by Ri ibn Shu'aib (14th cent.) in his drashos to Torah (Matos-Masei) that pig will become permitted in the future. the Or Hachaim to Leviticus (11:7) explains that pig will change biologically acquiring the sign of a kosher animal (chewing cud in a addition to split hooves). While some commentators ...


5

Judaism believed that God commanded us not to eat pork, and that this will not change. (It is one of Maimonides' 13 Fundamentals of Belief that the Torah will not be exchanged for another.) It's true that some of the classical commentaries observed that avoiding pork may have certain health benefits, but that was icing on the cake. Irrespective of the ...


11

No. Pigs are singled out by the Torah (Leviticus 11:7) as one of the unkosher animals that have a single kosher sign (they have split hooves but don't chew their cud), and as such, are Biblically prohibited. A Biblical prohibition cannot be overturned (Rambam's Laws of Foundations of the Torah 9:1). (According to some,) the kashrut laws were not instated ...


10

There is an Agadic opinion brought in Or Hachaim in parshas Shmini 11:7 that after the arrival of Moshiach, the pig will begin to chew its cud, and will at that point be Kosher.* Until that day, the Torah clearly gave two signs which we base our dietary laws upon which cannot be ignored. Whether or not Rabbis throughout the ages have tried to make keeping ...


0

Menachos 35b records that the tefillin strap of the shel yad must be long enough to reach the finger. Rambam specifies in a responsum (159) that the mitzvah is affixing it to the bicep, while further wrapping is just to "complete the knot" but doesnt sound mandatory. קשירת הרצועה על הברכה היא אחרי הברכה ובו תהיה קשירה תמה ואין הקשירה על האצבע מוכרח The ...


-3

a yad is used because they do not want to damage the torah e.g. smudge the ink or rip the parchment. this is because it usually takes 5 years to write the torah because if you make one mistake it cannot be used.


1

Not to negate the halachic-mechanics answer (which I like), but I think there's psychology at play here as well. At a simpler level, all rights in Judaism are tied to obligations, and it's just not fair to leave people hanging. Here's this widow, trying to figure out what to do with her life now. It's either going to be "the brother will step up and do the ...


4

I'm basing this off of some things that I learned from R' Tzvi Berkowitz. I don't recall his sources, so he'll just be my source. The mitzvah of Yibbum is building off of the relationship that existed between the deceased brother and his wife. This is why the yavam can "marry" the yevama even בעל כרחה (against her will) and even שלא מדעת (without ...


2

I'm going to build an idea off of the Netziv on that passuk, so I'll mention his point first. He mentions the idea that yibbum has to do with neshamos like the Ramban says in Vayeishev, but then goes on to say a different pshat. That taking off ones shoe is symbolic of removing the teva of the body and natural order in order to single oneself out for ...



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