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I am able to make out the first and the last words, and my best judgment is that this is a verse from Psalms 118:26: בָּר֣וּךְ הַ֭בָּא בְּשֵׁ֣ם יְהוָ֑ה בֵּ֝רַֽכְנוּכֶ֗ם מִבֵּ֥ית יְהוָֽה׃ Blessed be he that cometh in the name of the LORD; We bless you out of the house of the LORD. As mentioned, above, it is an ornament with no specific ...


0

Assuming that your question asks in general, if one who has already made a blessing earlier in the day on either the tallit katan or the tallit gadol, the answer is in Shulchan Aruch OC 8. He states that whenever there is a hefsek (interruption), one must make a new bracha on the tallit. I think Magen Avraham does mention a possible exception regarding the ...


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When Moshe Feinstein zl moved, he said to a visitor "Baruch Hashem I moved to a new apartment". The visitor asked if the new apartment was so much better than the old one and R Moshe answered Oh no! A dwelling is a dwelling - the advantages of one over the other are insignificant for me. I am happy, though, that I now live further from the yeshivah ...


0

Rav Hutner asks why there is no concept of increasing schar pesios with other mitzvos, e.g. I am not obliged to walk to the most distant mocher arba minim in town. He says because the inyan of tefillah is hiskarvus, therefore being niskarev to the shul is part of the avodah. Therefore it is not a whimsical schar (zigzagging would increase the schar) but a ...


2

In the Shulchan Aruch's formulation of this halacha (O.C. 90:18), he speaks of a בית מדרש קבוע, a fixed beis medrash. Nothing about your learning there or any personal connection to it. However, the Rema (ibid) adds in the one word לו, to him, in his formulation - a beis medrash that is fixed to him. This implies that it is your set beis medrash that you ...


1

When reciting prayers, beyond saying the words clearly, one should maintain focus on the words he is saying. Different people have different preferences about this. For some, it is hard to maintain concentration for a long period of time so they prefer to say the words somewhat faster. For others, it is easier to concentrate if they slow down and take a lot ...


1

Read about it more here. Since the main idea is to make a greater effort, it would seem to me (based on the information in the link) that the answer to your first two questions is yes, while the answer to the last is no, as mentioned explicitly in the Tzitz Eliezer in the above source: וענין זה של שכר פסיעות מסתברא דבודאי לא מקיימים ע"י נסיעה ברכב, דהגם ...


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The Shami nusach is accepting concepts brought from the Ari z"l. The Baladi nusach follows the older Yemenite tradition. For many Jews from Yemen, they do not want any innovations from their older tradition. Their tradition is that their community originated from soldiers sent to Yemen by Shlomo HaMelech. When Rambam moved to Egypt from Spain he had contact ...


2

The main difference is that the Shami use the almost the same "nusach" like the sepharadic Jews. While Baladi have a very different Nusach mainly they have a shorter "nusach". In any case both are pretty different from all the rest especially due to the accent and the special ways to read the Torah. Sorry is the answer is not elaborated due to the hour. ...


1

In the Paradesi Synagogue in Kochi, India, everyone is required to remove their shoes upon entering. Source: My wife and her family's personal experiences and Wikipedia.


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Many Karaite communities pray barefoot in deference to Exodus 3:5. It was the standard practice of Rabbinic Synagogues of the Middle east to take off their shoes. But as the modern European culture became the norm in the Middle East, people started wearing nice leather shoes and keeping them on. This same development occurred with prostration. Originally ...


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The point of having the woman's section on a balcony is that it is less easy to view them while davening when they are above you. However, a lattice is also sufficient.


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I wholly agree with Monica's excellent answer, but I would like to point out another phenomenon. Many non-Orthodox Jews go through a portion of their adult lives without giving much thought to religious practice. A traumatic event like the death of a parent can cause them to re-evaluate their lives. They may see the end of the long chain of familial ...


3

What Monica said in her answer is completely true. I would like to suggest another possible reason for this phenomenon. The reason is practicality. Orthodox Jews tend to live in clusters. Due to the diversity of "streams" of Orthodox Judaism (each one wanting to have their own shtieble), there are often clusters of many Orthodox synagogues within a small ...


15

It's something like that, based on my observations of my local Reform and Conservative communities. What I notice in particular with the Conservative daily minyan is that there are some regulars, some people who just come to say kaddish, and some people who initially came to say kaddish (for a month or for a year; I don't mean one day) and then stuck around. ...



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