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You can contact: The Catskills Institute c/o Phil Brown Department of Sociology Brown University, Box 1916 Providence, RI 02912 401-863-2367 They should be able to assist you. Regarding Tupper Lake. They are open in July & August. You can contact: Janet Chapman @ 518-359-9594.


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As someone who lived in San Diego for nearly 20 years and has been in the former synagogue you're talking about, the building is not a functioning synagogue and no yarmulke is required for entry, but out of respect, I would generally recommend it. I should add that I have attended simchas (weddings, etc.) in there (the building can be rented out), and when ...


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Let me respond as a convert and someone who has seen a few things that might be relevant to explaining the situation. First of all, most synagogues I've attended are fine with visitors who are not Jewish, but some synagogues have had unfortunate experiences that may have colored their view. For example, when I was in college, I went to services at the ...


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There is a very extensive discussion of this question (or at least a similar enough question) involving a consider amount of back and forth, in the teshuvos of the Nachalas Shiva (a student of the Taz). His conclusion is quoted by the Shaarei Teshuvah (288:3) עיין בשו"ת נחלת שבעה סי' ל"ט שעשה מעשה לברך החולה בשבת בבה"כ אע"פ שהחולה לא היה שם בעיר רק בישוב ...


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A synagogue is a Jewish house of prayer. The term refers to both the building and the institution. You'll also hear the Yiddish word shul, which is actually derived from "school" but has come to mean "synagogue". Some liberal Jews also use the word "temple" to refer to a synagogue. Usually it's used as a semi-proper noun, e.g. "are you going to temple ...


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yes you are of course aloud to pray in a synagogue, even an active one as long as if they ask you to be part of leading the communal prayers you turn down the offer. As far as to whether you should wear a yarmulke inside a historic building... that would depend on the rules given by the building owner or tour guide. if they don't ask you to wear one and ...


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I know how you're feeling. I visited my first synagogue with my church confirmation class in high school, then visited a reform synagogue where I went to college, and then went on to conservative and eventually orthodox synagogues where I finally converted. (I had a conservative conversion earlier, but I don't count that.) And although the synagogue your ...


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Refer to Kings I chap. 8 v 41-42. After completing the building of the First Temple in Jerusalem, King Solomon prays to God: "Also to the stranger who is not from the nation of Israel who comes (to visit the Temple) from a far-away land for the sake of your name. For they will hear of your name and your strong hand and outstretched arm and he will come and ...


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I have met people who have converted and who would go to shul while they were studying for conversion. However, they were careful to do so under the supervision of the rabbi who was teaching them and advising them on each step of the way. For example, how to "violate" the shabbat in some way, what to say, etc. Many nonJews put on a yarmulkeh when going to a ...


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Its from Masheches Brachos 28b which brings a braisah which discusses a story when Rabbi Eliezer became sick his talmidim asked him how does one merit olam haba ,He answered a few things and ends of off with the phrase when you pray know who you are standing before. Rashi explains: דעו לפני מי וכו' - כדי שתתפללו ביראה ובכוונה.


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The words apparently appear in a number of places. This site sources them, in the plural, to the talmud, Brachot 28b.


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A synagogue (Yiddish: shul, Hebrew: ''bet knesset'') is an Orthodox or Conservative house of prayer. A temple is a Reform house of prayer. To Orthodox Jews, the Temple refers to the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. Reform Jews believe that nowadays the synagogues have taken the place of the Temple, so that's why they call it that. A congregation usually refers to ...


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In the first letter in Community covenant and commitment, Rabbi Soloveitchik writes against using interfaith chapels. At the end of the piece he adds on an idea against the practice which seems to have significance to your question. He says that the actual building of different houses of worship convey different expressions of religiousness. The church with ...


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This is not a formal answer to my own question, but I figured this info would be more noticeable to readers if it were an answer rather than a comment. I located an on-line Mi Sheberach manager, http://www.misheberachlcholim.org/pages/view/About_CLM I just registered as Gabbai, and I included one of my friends. This looks very helpful! I will update my ...


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Assuming one would be allowed to pray in the synagogue if it weren't attached to the House of the One, I don't see why not. It shouldn't be any different than the chapel area at JFK where there are three separate rooms next to each other for Muslims, Christians, and Jews and the chaplains share an office.



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