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9

The Babylonian Talmud (M'gila, page 3 column 1) relates in the name of Ravina: One who is afraid [for no apparent reason] — although he doesn't see [anything], his mazal sees [something]. The commentary of Rashi explains that "mazal" here refers to the person's angel. And the commentary Ben Y'hoyada explains that what his mazal sees (and he's afraid ...


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I'd call it reasonable. Maybe not quite to the degree that a church would be, but reasonable. While people can and do hold prayer services in their living rooms or basements, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein wrote that it's far better to pray in a building designated as a synagogue. (The Amish and Mennonites, in contrast, acknowledge no "sanctity of space" per se ...


0

While it seems that @SabbaHillel seemed to cover the basic points., I'll add in what I've seen regarding this issue. There will likely be plenty of overlap, but hopefully I'll be able to add certain points as well. To start off with, Artscroll's Mourning in Halachah (39:21) seems to unequivocally say that a woman should not say Kaddish. In one of the ...


4

Regarding יישר כוח, i will be basing information off of the Hebrew Wikipedia article on the phrase. What is the origin of these expressions? יישר כוח comes from a line in Shabbos 87a: שנאמר (שמות לד, א) אשר שברת ואמר ר"ל יישר כחך ששיברת חזק וברוך (some also say חזק ואמץ) seems to be based on the Gemara in Brachos 32b that says that four people ...


0

This article, 1st paragraph says: Tashmishei kedushah are objects which serve a holy object (such as a Sefer Torah), They contain a holy object or cover it and are in immediate contact with it. The law of tashmishei kedushah applies even to objects which are used more to protect than to show respect for a holy object (e.g. the ark in which a ...


4

The Aruch Hashulchan (154:5) (as cited here) writes that technically a yad would not have been considered a tashmish kedusha if that had been its sole function. However, the custom is (and was) to also hang it from the Torah as a decoration. Therefore, it is considered a tashmish kedusha with all the attendant restrictions, such as requiring "sheimos geniza" ...


1

Aruch Hashulchan Orach Chaim 90:15 says that it is better to Daven in a small Minyan where there is no talking over a large Minyan (Losing out on B'rov Am) where there is talking. Granted that he does not say here that the Minyan should be closed down, however he does clearly say that the non talking small Shul is superior.


1

The answer to this question would depend on whether the person purchased the seat 24/7/365 or whether the person just purchased the right to this seat when he is there. After discussing this with my Rabbi, he said that no Shul is selling you the seat for 24/7/365, and he felt that if the Halacha is by Talis or Tefilin where there it is personally owned that ...


1

In addition to this excellent advice, make it easy for people who've heard about it to join in the middle. Divide a year-long class into shorter segments, maybe 4-6 weeks each, to provide some good entry points. For example, we ran a beginner class on the prayer service and made it clear that if you missed the classes on kri'at sh'ma you could still come ...


3

If we are talking about talking during davening, you can't. As to talking business in schul not during davening, it would tend to be forbidden. However, the Ben ish chai writes that if one is a sefarim seller, he may do business in the schul as the schul is the natural gathering place of people who study torah. A shatnez checker is in a similar situation.


4

The basic discussion as shown below is not a matter of Kol Isha. It is actually a matter of the customs of the community. Thus the answer to your question would be that Kol Isha is not applicable to a woman saying kaddish. The articles linked below show the actual reasons for the discussion. Since Kol Isha is not applicable, there would be no discussion ...



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