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14

The walls of the sukkah can be constructed anytime you want; you can even leave them up all year, if you're so inclined. (There are even people who have retractable roofs on their houses, so that their sukkah is their dining room or bedrooms or whatever.) The sechach (plant material used for the roof of the sukkah) is a different story. You can put it up ...


13

There is no lav in the Torah against eating outside the Sukkah, so it would just be a bitul aseh. It says "Basukkos teshvu", but does not say anythink like "lo tochal chutz me'suka".


12

Most will tell you that reading the other 4 Megillahs is custom, not Rabbinic decree. That's the general practice. The Vilna Gaon, however, is of the opinion that all 5 Megillahs must be read from a handwritten parchment klaf, and (if done so) have the blessing "who commanded us regarding Megillah reading." You will see this opinion out there too. (Mind ...


12

I don't have an explicit answer, but since women are not obligated to sit in the sukkah, and we know that women are obligated to fulfill negative commandments, it would stand to reason that eating out of the Sukkah would be a Bittul Asseh.


11

keep them in the fridge. this also helps to prevent mold growing on the lulav holder, and doesn't take hardly any effort, like many complicated wet paper towel/Al foil things


11

Yes. The gemara in the beginning of Sukkah discusses different factors that would invalidate a sukkah, but transparency isn't an issue. You can also make the walls with 4 horizontal strings, each within 3 tefachim from the other one. Though if it was completely transparent, i.e. invisible, perhaps there would be an issue that no one could tell they're in a ...


11

http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49716&st=&pgnum=30 Per the Machtzis HaShekel Siman 640:9 it is preferable to eat in a Sukkah with a Schlack, over eating in the house when it is raining since there are Poskim that consider it a Kosher Succah. The Bikurrei Yaakov Siman 626:12 says also that it is preferable to eat in a ...


10

Like any time-bound, yes-do mitzva; women aren't obligated, but they receive merit if they choose to do it.


9

Even if there's a decoration that completely covers the schach, if it's placed there merely for decoration, than it isn't a problem, provided that the decorations are within 4 tefachim of the schach (Gemara Sukka 10a, Shulchan Aruch O.C. 627:4) However, this is assuming that they have been placed there for the purpose of decorations, otherwise, even a small ...


9

As long as they are within 4 tefachim of the sechach, they are batel to the sechach- even a lot of decorations. (S.A. O.C. 627:4)


9

Don't take my word on the translation, but Shulchan Aruch 634:2 says: If it's round, it must contain within it a square of seven by seven t'fachim. And MB adds that any other shape has the same rule and that one need not sit in the contained square. You ask about wall length, though. For a circle, a contained square of 7×7 means, Baer Hetev and others ...


9

You can eat in a sukkah standing up (as regards the lawa of sukkot). The word 'sitting' is used to imply a sort of permanence of dwelling, but if one eats in a sukkah while standing he certainly says a bracha and fulfils his mitzva. (See Aruch Hashulchan OC 643:3)


8

Because in theory you could have said Shehecheyanu when you prepared (bound) your lulav before Sukkos. So even supposing that the second day of Sukkos was the real Yom Tov (and the previous day was actually erev Sukkos), your Shehecheyanu then would still count as the real thing. (By contrast, with kiddush, you're saying the berachah because of the holiday ...


7

Buy an extra set or two. the cost is trivial compared to the hiddur of a $50 etrog.


7

The opinion of Beis Shamai that we should lit candles in a decreasing way (from 8 to 1) has something common with the fact that Korbanos of the Succos are also decreasing (from 13 to 7).


7

Yes. While R'Yehuda holds "lulav tzorech egged" (they need to be tied), and therefore one must use part of the 4 minim to tie it, the halacha is not like R'Yehuda. Thus you can use anything to tie the 4 minim, or nothing at all. In fact, the Gemara says the anshei Yerushalayim would use gold to tie their lulavim. Even though its not required, we have a ...


7

I don't know that "Why did the paytan choose this formulation" can be answered. I don't think that the Paytan himself ever explained his choice of formulation( I haven't seen any evidence of such, and I'm under the impression Paytanim rarely did), and everything else is speculation. As to a question of "Why would the Paytan choose this formulation", I found ...


7

The Tur (O.C. 625) indicates that you are correct in your question, as he explains why Sukkos isn't in the spring, since we got the huts after we left Egypt in the spring, and it should be then that we celebrate. But it was moved to make it more obvious that we are doing it for the Mitzvah, and not to appreciate the nice weather. This seems to imply that ...


7

This is a Machloket in the Talmud (Sukkah 27b, see OC 637) and the Halacha follows the Sages that one can start building a Sukkah on Chol HaMoed. Even R Eliezer who argued there agreed that if one's Sukkah fell down on Chol HaMoed that one can rebuild it.


6

In theory it should work with the following qualifications: 1- Your car roof width from the far inner door to the schach area is 4 amos or less (for dofen akuma) 2- Your car doors are less than 3 tefachim off the ground (for mechitza- gediim bok'im) Like you mentioned, you need the second door for the third wall, just resting it on the roof won't help. ...


6

Both are celebrated for eight days Both have full hallel on all the days Both are celebrated outside the house (sukkah is outside, and menorah should be outside) Both are Possul if they are more than 20 amos high (i.e. above the ground) Both call for hiddur mitzvah (lulav we try to get the best, and menorah by adding more each night) all taken from here.


6

The source is in the Talmud, Megillah 31a (link). It is a statement of Rav Huna, in the name of Rav: אמר רב הונא אמר רב שבת שחל להיות בחולו של מועד בין בפסח בין בסוכות מקרא קרינן ראה אתה Rashi explains: מקרא קרינן ראה אתה - שיש שם מצות שבת ורגלים וחולו של מועד דכתיב את חג המצות תשמור ומכאן למדנו איסור מלאכת חולו של מועד במסכת חגיגה (דף ...


6

According to Halacha (Orthodox Jewish Law) you may build the Sukkah from 30 days prior to the Yom Tov. If it was made more than 30 days before the holiday, and you do not have in mind that it is being made for Succos, all you got to do is remove some Sechach and replace it and have in mind that it is for Succos and then it is Kosher. If it was put up anytime ...


6

I don't have time to consult the sources right now, but if memory serves correctly, there is no problem disassembling a sukkah during Chol HaMoed. (There are actually portable sukkahs on the market, which are designed to be taken apart and reassembled during the holiday.) You would only run into problems if you wanted to use the materials for some other ...


6

In Maseches Suka daf dalet amud beis (copied below), Rava rejects Abaye's proposal for an platform without walls because there is a requirement that they be "ניכר". Therefore there may be a basis for transparent walls being invalid. היתה גבוהה מעשרים אמה ובנה בה עמוד שהוא גבוה עשרה טפחים ויש בו הכשר סוכה סבר אביי למימר גוד אסיק מחיצתא א"ל רבא בעינן מחיצות ...


6

Nope. If the s'chach isn't valid, it's not a sukkah. The practical advantage is, you can have all sorts of nice stuff in the sukkah; if it starts to rain, just put up the tarp; as soon as it stops raining you can pull off the tarp and get right back to your mitzva. Whereas if you didn't have the tarp, you have to rush everything out of your sukkah when it ...


6

When it is read from a Klaf then you make a Bracha, however most Shuls do not read the Megilos from a Klaf only on Purim and therefore they do not make the Bracha Al Mikrah Megilah only on Purim.


6

I found a German source in the Tur, Orach Chayyim 625: "...in the seventh month, when it's rainy, and people generally leave their summer shade huts and go into their houses, we leave our houses and sit in our huts so that everyone will see that it's because of the commandment of The King to do so." And a friend pointed me to a Mediterranean source in ...


6

"She waits passively. All the while until the end of shabbos." (Meaning -- she doesn't do stuff on shabbos to prepare for non-shabbos.)



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