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11

Regarding #1: If it is likely to melt, I assume it would be a problem using this to begin with, as the walls are not steady. Not sure what you mean here. If the walls don't sway in the wind, then they are halachically steady. (And see #3) Regarding #2: What if there is a high likelihood of heavy snow on a nearly daily basis. Enough snow to cover ...


6

I have never actually used it as my sukka is built on cement, but you can get Campsite flooring (For example, maybe in a different color or a different option). Many of these camp mats dry quickly, allow water to drain properly, can be staked down, and shouldn't kill your grass (hopefully). Edit: Here is a link where you can actually buy the stuff. Edit ...


5

The way I understood the Tur is that its not about the weather. The weather in Tishrai and Nissan are around the same. The issue is the BUILDING of the Sukka. People generally do not buy patio furniture to sit outside in the fall. You generally build your outdoor huts in the spring because the spring is the start of good weather. The fall is the end of it ...


4

Art Scroll 6b2 goes into more detail. All agree that the pronounced form has primacy so that of the 6 (3*2) we are left with four (2*2) allusions. The rabbanan then say that one of the four allusions is required for schach leaving three allusions. (note 23). The reason is that as once the two of the actual references are available for learning an allusion, ...


3

I am a Lubavitcher Chassisd myself that learns in a Lithuanian yeshiva. Before Sukkos one year, during a Halacha class, my rebbe was speaking about this topic of sleeping in the sukkah, and I mentioned that in Chabad they don't sleep in the Sukkah because its too holy. He got really angry at that and said "Well we follow like the Shulchan Aruch" and then ...


3

It would seem from the last Remo in סימן תרלח - סכה ונויה אסורין כל שבעה that it's not a problem. Preferably you should make a condition - verbally, before that Chag begins - that the hanger is not part of the Sukka. But even if you didn't it's OK to use it. אֲבָל בְּנוֹיִין שֶׁנּוֹתְנִים בַּדְּפָנוֹת, כְּגוֹן סְדִינִים הַמְצֻיָּרִים, נוֹהֲגִין ...


2

You could try laying pavers or other flat stones / slate over the grass or dirt, if your area is somewhat even. If it is isn't even, you may have to put gravel or a layer of soil to cover the area and smooth it down before laying the pavers. My driveway is dirt and gravel, but the majority of it is even, fortunately. I do a get a bit of ponding after a ...


2

There are two problems that come to mind. There is a general law about building a sukkah, discussed in the Talmud (Sukkah 24b) and throughout rabbinic literature, that the walls of a sukkah should not sway in the wind. Modern responsa on canvas walls discuss this issue at great length (see, for example, Yaabia Omer O"H, vol. 9, 59:1) and the means to ...


2

The Mechaber in סימן תרלא - סכה שחמתה מרבה מצלתה ויתר דיני הסכך says that if there's no roof then it's invalid, unless there's a square-Tefach of [horizontal] roof, or that there's a Tefach of vertical walls between the ground and the slanted wall-roof: The Remo however, permits such a Sukka, on condition that there's the minimal 7x7 Tefachim area at a ...


2

Note that since one can build a succa on a boat, the pier should also be allowable. (logic only) Maseches Sukka Perek 2 Mishna 3 If one builds his sukkah on the top of a wagon or on the deck of a ship, it is valid, and they may go up into it on a festival day. Of course the gemoro on daf 23a of masechet succah points out that this is the subject of ...


2

Judaica Press commentary on 8:14 says And the found written ... It seems very strange that the Jews did not know anything about the mitzvah of sukkah ... The commentary states that it was not that they did not know about the mitzvah of sukkos. Judaica Press cites Malbim and others that this refers to Yerushalayim as specified in Shulchan Aruch ...


2

In the mishnah it says that if you have a sukkah on top of a sukkah, if you can't use the upper one, the lower one is kosher. I would assume in that case the walls extend above the schach.


1

The most basic explanation of the issue is that the day becomes a tarti disasri, a self contradiction. How can it be both the last day of Succos and Shmini Atzeres? I've heard many drashos trying to explain in depth what the issue is to actually enjoin it as a multiplicity of days, but I will offer one that seems simple. The wording used in the Tur ...


1

The footprint of a suka need not be convex. In other words, there can be two points inside a suka, equally high off the ground, such that the straight line segment joining those two points includes some points outside the suka. Proof: Mishna B'rura 634:1 forbids such a case where the local convex area is less than seven handbreadths by seven handbreadths ...


1

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן קלה - דיני ישיבת סכה at the end of סעיף ט says: וְכֵן כְֹּשֶהָעֵת קַר וְהַמַּאֲכָלִים נִקְרָשִׁים בְּתוֹךְ הַסֻּכָּה, פָּטוּר מִן הַסֻּכָּה וְאוֹכֵל בַּבָּיִת That if it is so cold in the Sukka that the food congeals, one is exempted from sitting in the Sukka and one eats inside. As he continues in סעיף יא: ...


1

I asked my LOR this exact question as we were going away for Shemini Atzeret/Simchat Torah, and rain was expected, and I wanted to protect the schach. He answered that it was not permissible to take down the Sukkah. It had to be left up until after Simchat Torah. It was permissible to take down sukkah decorations, tables, chairs, lights, etc., but the ...


1

There are many details found in the Shulchan Aruch siman 626. If the branch only provides a minority of the shade etc. In one situation having the branch mixed in with the kosher schach is actually beneficial. But according to one opinion in the Shulchan Aruch, one should never under any circumstances have any branch above the schach. If you rule with ...


1

The walls may be higher than the schahch. It is kosher. It would seem that such a thing violates none of the laws of building a kosher Sukkah. Another proof to this (besides what Shmuly wrote about a Sukkah above a Sukkah) is that all walls which are at least 10 handbreadths tall (this is the halachic definition of a wall from a halachah l'Moshe mi'Sinai) ...


1

Piskei Tshuvos in siman 638 #3, brings some sources that discuss this. It is a machlokes. The שואל ומשיב is stringent. His opinion is brought in פסקי תשובה. In עיקרי הד׳ט is an opinion to be lenient, he compares this to removing tzitzis from one beged to place on another. He also quotes להורות נתן who deals with this issue at length and ends up allowing it ...


1

The Gemara in Sukkah (I believe in the daf is in the high-teens) discusses a halachic principle of dofen akuma (a bent wall). The case is slightly different from your scenario, but I think still applies. The Gemara's case is when there is a bit of roofing that is not kosher for skhakh separating the walls and the kosher skhakh. Normally the maximum distance ...


1

I built a Shlock this year for a Succah on a deck measuring 8x18 feet that worked perfectly. It was corrugated plastic roofing on a 2x2 frame on wheels that slid on a track made of aluminum studs (cost about $3.00 each at Home Depot. It can be opened and closed by one person inside the Succah. Please contact me if you would like more details. ...


1

A relative of mine uses plywood boards laid out on some 2x4 beams. You only have to level the beams and the floor is as good as indoors.



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