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10

Maseches Derech Eretz Zuta Ch. 5 states: "One who is a Talmid Chacham (Torah scholar) should not eat while standing." From the context it is evident that this behavior is considered unrefined. Apparently there would not be anything halachically wrong for a non-scholar to eat while standing, though it's quite understandable why one would want to avoid it. ...


9

I don't know whether he personally did, but he does mention this custom in his siddur, and gives the Zohar as the source. (It states that the seated part of davening corresponds to the shel yad, and the standing part - primarily Shemoneh Esrei, I guess - to the shel rosh.) Dayan Raskin, in his notes to the siddur there, has an extensive discussion of this ...


9

It is said in name of Rav Chaim Soloveitchik that when we say Elokenu it makes the Zimun into a Davar Shebikedusha. That is the reason why some people stand when they say Elokenu, since according to some the Minhag is to stand during a Davar Shebikedusha. This Minhag is not universal. Sefardim do not stand by Kaddish in many cases.


9

You can eat in a sukkah standing up (as regards the lawa of sukkot). The word 'sitting' is used to imply a sort of permanence of dwelling, but if one eats in a sukkah while standing he certainly says a bracha and fulfils his mitzva. (See Aruch Hashulchan OC 643:3)


9

The Talmud (Megillah 21a) relates that from the days of Moshe through those of Rabban Gamliel the Torah was only studied while standing. After Rabban Gamliel's death, "sickness" descended to the world and people began to need to study while seated. It further relates (based on the verse Devarim 5:27) that a teacher should be on equal standing with his ...


8

The Chidah in Shu"t Chaim Sha'al 1:71:2 brings down that if one is sitting and holding a sefer Torah and a Rebbe passes by one should not get up. Also, I believe if one sits with a Torah during hakafos it is fine.


8

The Mishna Berura (2:11) quoted in the linked article brings from the Shaloh Hakadosh that while not required by the strict letter of the law it is considered "midas chassidus" (pious behavior) to cover one's head while sleeping.


7

When the sefer torah is lifted from the bimah the tzibbur has to stand Sources: Refer to Rashba 3:281, Radavz 6:shnei alofim 16:page 39, Elya Rabbah 149:1, Shach Y.D. 242:38, Shar Ha'tzyion 146:18, Sharei Ephraim 10:18, Sharei Chaim 10:19, Be'er Moshe 3:23:2, Yalkut Yosef 2:134:16, Yisroel B'mamadam 25:63, see Magen Avraham end of 141. One should ...


7

If one leans against something to the point that if it were removed he would fall it is considered as if he were sitting. Will give you source when I get a moment.


7

The sandak, if a bris takes place in the morning (as per the first custom cited in Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 559:7).


7

I don't have a source for the custom, but I think it's irrelevant. The onus is upon him to show a source that it isn't tznius. Standing for a woman in general certainly isn't a violation of tznius - in fact the Gemara says one is obligated to stand up for the wife of a talmid chacham (Shevuos 30b).


6

If I understand him correctly, Igros Moshe (OC4 22, IIRC) says that one may stand during the dibros so as to accord them honor and must do so if the rest of the congregation is doing so but that if he is concerned that that makes it seem like they're the only important part of the tora then he should stand also during the rest of the reading that day. As ...


6

My Rebbi once told me (if I remember correctly) that we do so because that is essentially what we are saying. "We don't know what to do" (vaanachnu lo neida ma na'aseh), so we try everything we can -- laying, sitting, standing.


6

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 15:6 states: Some say that one need not stand for Kaddish. However, any Kaddish which catches you standing, like after Hallel, one should [remain] standing until after [responding] Yehei Shmei Rabba. And some say that one should always stand for Kaddish and other Davar SheBiKedusha, since we should learn a Kal ...


6

It is a dispute in poskim, and there are different customs about which one to follow. Why is this psalm different than all other Psalms? Two reasons, one is that it has a reference to the sacrifice, and when a Kohen brought the sacrifices he was standing (that opinion would also hold to stand while saying the Korbanos that preceded Baruch Sheamar). The ...


5

In Ashkenazi Shul the person getting Hagbah.


5

הרב יוסף דוב סולוביציק was נוהג to do ליפול על פניו for Tachnun even in a place that has no Sefer Torah. So accordingly (according to the "Rav") you would follow the normal procedure for sitting/leaning and covering your face. [ועיי"ש בב"י בשם הרא"ש,ובט"ז סק"ה, ובכף החיים ס"ק מ בזה]


5

Sit, but do not fall/lean/cover your face on or with your arm. (S.A., O.C., 131, 2) i.e. Say it the way Sefardim say it even when in a Beis Hakneses, even with a Sefer Torah there.


5

See Halachically Speaking (Volume 4, Issue 12, Page 8) where the author brings that many poskim [see footnote 108 for names] actually say to stand the entire Chuppah. (One reason given is because the Chosson is doing a Mitzvah, so we stand in his honor). Common custom however, is not like that. He then goes on to say: It is customary to stand when the ...


5

The Shulchan Aruch (103:2) states: בקש לצאת ממנו רוח מלמטה ונצטער הרבה ואינו יכול להעמיד עצמו הולך אחוריו ארבע אמות ומוציא הרוח וממתין עד שיכלה הריח...וחוזר למקומו וחוזר למקום שפסק If a person has to pass gas and he is unable to hold it in, he should walk backward four amot, release the gas and wait until the smell subsides...and he should then ...


5

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 56:11 writes (my translation): מנהג האשכנזים כדעת הרמ''א, לעמוד בשעה שעונים קדיש וברכו, וספרדי שמתפלל עם אשכנזים, נכון שיעמוד גם הוא עמהם בעת אמירת קדיש וברכו, כדי שלא יהיה בכלל יושב בין העומדים. The Ashkenazi custom, per the ReM"A, is to stand when responding to Qaddish and Barekhu. And, as for a ...


4

It's generally considered respectful for the congregation to stand whenever the Torah is out but not "at rest." When it's sitting on the bima; when it's being held by someone seated (e.g. during the haftorah reading); and when it's in the Aron are all situations where it's "at rest." When it's being picked up it's not "at rest", so it's appropriate to ...


4

It's the same definition of "leaning" used regarding leaning on an animal intended for sacrifice. You'll probably find the definition fleshed out better (pun intended) over there; the Rambam describes it in Maaseh HaKorbanot 3:12, probably track down commentaries from there, possibly down to the Aruch HaShulchan Ha'Atid, (or back into the Rishonim on that ...


4

See here: http://www.mesora.org/StandingDibros.html The Rambam was opposed to it. yet this is near universal custom. R' Soloveitchik and R' Moshe explain why it is not a problem.


4

The reason we do Hagbah is to show the congregation what parsha we are reading. For this reason, the Sephardi minhag of doing Hagbah BEFORE reading makes far more sense. Sephardim also point to exactly where we are going to read. (Note - I am Ashkenaz)


4

Having prayed in many different Synagogues that are from all the spectrum's of Orthodoxy, I have never come across a chair that is left vacant for Mashiach. Perhaps this is being confused with the Kisai Shel Eliyahu which many Synagogues have, and is used by a Bris. However as per Sefer HaZichronos many times others do sit on the Kisai Shel Eliyahu.


4

For Pesukei dezimroh OU Torah tidbits says, that the Ashrei is similar to the meditation of the pious men of earlier generations (B’rachot 32b) would spend an hour before prayer, and the source for this practice is the verse ASHREI YOSH’VEI VEITECHA… Praiseworthy are those who dwell in Your house, they will continue to praise you, Selah. Rashi expounds that ...


4

Rav Joseph B. Soloveitchik (quoted in Nefesh Harav page 151-2) was careful to sit during Ashrei of Mincha based on the language of the Rambam Tefilla 9:8. He felt this was not just a permission to sit but a requirement in order to establish (לקבוע) a Tzibbur. The footnote there references an article in Beis Yitzchak (5749 volume 21 page 18) where Rav ...


4

Siach Tefila question 137 & 138 indicates as follows. If one is in the midst of the actual Tachanun (the part where you place your head on your arm) then he should finish the Tachanun, however if one is in any other part then he should stop and say Vayehi Bin'soa.


4

Yalkut Yosef 25:69 says that it is done that way Al Pi Kabala. מנהגינו על פי הקבלה להניח תפילין של יד מיושב, ותפילין של ראש מעומד. ומנהג האשכנזים להניח בין תפילין של יד בין תפילין של ראש מעומד. [ילקו''י על תפילין מהדורת תשס''ד, סימן כה הערה סח, שאר''י חלק א' עמ' שנב].



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