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13

In every bowling alley I've been to, the operation of the lanes depends on electro-mechanical devices that reset the pins and return the ball. As these actions are triggered by the bowler's bowling and are helpful to the bowler, they'd constitute a "pesik reisha denicha leih" - an expected consequence that's desirable - and would therefore be forbidden as ...


10

As far as I understand it, the three major Judaic objections would be: A.) Putting yourself at risk of injury. B.) Putting others at risk of injury. C.) Developing wrong character traits within yourself by practicing shooting at your buddies. (Or similarly, trying to emulate the wrong types of people.) (Any other objections that anyone can think of?) As ...


8

First off: if you exercise at night it's a moot issue, as the mitzva of tzitzis is only in the daytime. "Need" is a strong word. The strict obligation is to put fringes on any four-cornered garment I may happen to wear. No four-cornered garment, no obligation. We tend to think of tzitzis as a special ritual garment (like tefilin), when in fact for ...


8

Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 421:5 says (in my own translation): Two who wrestled together, and one knocked the other to the ground so that he fell and got blinded, he's not liable. The S'ma explains: The reason for this is: Since they both wrestled willingly, each intending to knock down his fellow, and each knowing that it's impossible to be ...


7

There are a number of opinions that state that catch and release is forbidden halachically on account of צער בעלי חיים - causing the animal pain. For example, according to the Rav Menashe Klein, Zt"l - Mishneh Halachot - Choshen Mishpat - Chelek 12, Siman 432, it is asur (forbidden) to fish for sport if the fish will not be used for food, and even if the ...


7

The Rabbis forbade taking medicine on Shabbos (barring the person being sick), because they were worried one might come to grind medicine on Shabbos (think mortar and pestle), and grinding on Shabbos is a Biblical Prohibition (Tochen). In the time of the Gemara (and perhaps now, although I'm not aware of it) people would take medicine, in order to sweat for ...


6

HaRav Binyomin Zilber zt"l wrote a responsum on this question to a rosh yeshiva in the US a few decades ago (see Az Nidberu 2, 55). He brings various Rishonim and for the most part says they should keep their tzitzis on, but doesn't discuss the issue of sweat. The question was posed in terms of discomfort on the basketball court. Although elsewhere HaRav ...


6

Generally a Dojo has a soft mat on which you kneel, and the bowing is done as a form of greeting to a person. As long as you are not kneeling on a stone floor, it's not strictly a problem. (Halacha commentary 14) As for fears of Avodah Zarah in regards to Kung Fu, you should in general not be exposed to anything. If you are exposed to concepts and ...


6

From what I recall, doing something for medicinal or aerobic reasons generally falls under the category of refuah, which is a rabbinic prohibition which itself falls under the category of tochein. However, there is an important distinction to be made. There are two types of these activities: Things that are clearly only for the medicinal, dietary, or ...


6

The Mishnah Brurah (549:1) explains that the main point of a fast is to do teshuvah, and not the fast itself: By Ninveh, concerning G-d undoing the decree to destroy them, it says "And G-d saw their actions," not "And G-d saw their fast." The fast is merely a preparation for the teshuvah. He continues, quoting the Chayei Adam, that those people who spend the ...


6

I think the question is the phrase "crying for chinam". My suspicion is it's not "you cried about something unimportant", rather it's "you cried when there was every reason not to." G-d had promised them they'd enter the land, and here they were crying "oh boo hoo we won't enter the land", there was no reason for them to be sad. Whereas if my favorite team ...


5

Rav Moshe Feinstein has a great responsa in which he says that if it gives you pleasure you may hunt. Fish are generally considered to be lower life forms in that we grant fish fewer halakhic protections (for example eiver min ha'hai does not apply to fish). Though Rav Moshe does say in his responsa that it is not something that he thins is great to do it ...


5

Are you somehow comparing volleyball to the partition between the men's and women's seating in a synagogue? Outside the synagogue, the only rules on contact between genders are: Touching. You shouldn't touch someone of the opposite gender, other than your spouse or close relative. Many rabbis opine this is only with regards to "affectionate" touching (or ...


4

For an extensive discussion see here: http://torahmusings.com/2011/02/violent-sports/


4

Check out this link: Playing Ball On Shabbat And Yom Tov, Rabbi Saul J. Berman


4

As per the Shulchan Aruch O.C. 21:1, a man is not permitted to be playful with women whose relationship with him is forbidden by punishment of Kareth. This includes married women, (some) relatives and women who have the status of Nidah. Though I can't quote a source, I think we can safely assume this does not apply to relatives for whom we are not concerned ...


4

The rolling ball is the "koach" of the original person, analogous to a thrown rock. When the ball then hits the pins/sensors/etc that action is "koach kocho" of the original person, meaning it is twice removed from the person himself (for the definition see the Rambam Hilchos Rotzeach 6:15). Now see the Avnei Nezer OH 230:2 who argues that "koach kocho" is ...


4

Aside from the fact that most prize fights are on Friday or Saturday night (often before Shabbos is out), I'm not sure there is a problem. Chabad apparently doesn't think so as they have heavily promoted one of their own, welterweight fighter Dmitriy Salita (35-1-1), since he became frum and turned pro 12 years ago. (He's fighting former champion Hector ...


3

According to the tana kama in the baraisa on Avodah Zarah 18b, you can't go to stadiums, because of idolatry and because of frivolity. Rabbi Nasan permits it because he might be able to save a Jew if he's offered to the gladiators, or at least he can testify that he died so that his wife could remarry. There's nothing marked in the Ein Mishpat there, so it ...


3

Offhand, the only issues I can think of are (a) if there's excrement or something else smelly nearby, or (b) if there are immodestly dressed women in your field of vision. So if you're jogging in an area where the dog owners are careful to clean up after their pets, and there aren't any women also out jogging in shorts or sports bras, then I would think it ...


3

As far as I know, the reason for women not wearing pants doesn't have to do with their being male garments. Especially today, nobody thinks twice upon seeing a woman wearing pants. I believe that the main reason for wearing skirts over pants is due to tzniut (modesty); however, a large number of modern poskim rule that there is no problem at all with women ...


3

Rosh Hashana is a two-day holiday. If Wednesday night begins the first day, as noted by Ari Brodsky in a comment on the question, then playing on Thursday, either before or after sundown, doesn't help -- it's still Rosh Hashana, moving into the second day. If Wednesday night began the second day of Rosh Hashana (which isn't actually possible according to ...


2

Paintballing has less chance of injury then bowling and fishing. As for the manners, when your playing a game, just say to eachother that at this and this range, dont shoot at all. And if a mistake happens, its just once per a group which isint so bad, and definitly not life changing. I dont see how one mistake can change your midos, even IF it happened.


2

I asked about this issue years back. My posek was OK with the idea of laser tag ("it's just a game"), but felt that paintballing was a midos problem (even if the other person is mochel, it is bad midos to put a bruise in another person").


2

I remember hearing Rabbi Bertram Left (former O-U Synagogues director and before that a shul rav) answer this question raised by his teenage daughter (now a Judaic studies teacher at Stern College). He instructed her to wear a loose skirt over her ski pants.


2

Many who play attach their Yarmulkas via a bobby pin or Kippon. This assures that it will remain on their head and not fall off while playing sports.


1

The pashut answer is that seemingly being a "fan" would include speaking of the praise of this non-Jewish sports figure (specifically to admire his strength and abilities) then it would fall into what it says in SA YD Siman 151 Sif 14 and therefore ossur. Of course says over there if he's doing it with the kavana to be m'sheba'ach HaShem and give thanks for ...


1

It's not forbidden because anything that is not explicitly forbidden is permitted. What source holds that this is forbidden?



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