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6

The Aleppo, Leningrad, and Damascus Codices all have it Rafeh. Even the original Bomberg Mikraot Gedolot has it Rafeh! Minchat Shai ad loc. comments that it should be Rafeh. I did find that the Codex Bodmer 21 does have it with a Dagesh but given the evidence this should clearly be disregarded. I note all the above sources (even Bodmer) have a Tarcha (a ...


4

The various spellings are trying to get at a vowel-less pronunciation of the final syllable: the syllabic n (for example, some English dialects pronounce "button" as "but'n", with a syllabic n at the end). From Uriel Weinreich's dictionary, in the section on non-YIVO-standard orthography: a superfluous ע is sometimes written before final ל or ן to mark ...


2

דוד is referring to King David. דויד is referring to Moshiach ben David specifically as Melech HaMoshiach. This is brought in Kol HaTor 2: 2. This is also brought in Be'er Yitzchok on Likkutei HaGra 63.


1

The reason is because of david's friendship with Jonathan. A yud was added to David's name and a 'hei' to Jonathan's. To show that their great friendship had hashem's blessing. Since these were 'additions' one doesnt use them in spelling their names. Although R Yehonasan Eibeshuts did add the 'hei'. I will have to look for the source.



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